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I am currently playing/performing in a 6 piece electric band that rehearses in a small room and my volume level even when I seem to be blending bothers the drummer during the practice so I want something I can use to lower the volume levels for practice besides a nerf ball.

Suggestions?

B
 

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Unless you purchase like an E-sax mute then there isn't much you can do other than play quietly.
 

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my volume level even when I seem to be blending bothers the drummer
I never thought I'd live to see the day!

We may not have won the war, but at least a small battle . Congratulations! :)

The problem with an e mute for band rehearsals would be that with normal headphones, nobody would hear you. Except you. Or you could wire the headphone socket to a small amp, but terribly complicated compared with just suggesting the drummer plays a little louder to blend as well.
 

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You can roll a rag into a ring and put it in the bell, like a doughnut. But it isn't particularly effective through the whole range of the instrument. I've seen an advertisement for some inserts, though — one for the neck, one further down the tube, and one in the bell. They looked to be made of bristles, like a bottle brush. I don't know how well they work but you might want to experiment with something like that. Evidently the bristles are sparse enough to allow the air column to move through the horn and not affect pitch. And I'll state again, I've never seen these other than in an ad.
 

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Tell the drummer the STFU. Seriously, in a small room things are going to sound crappy.

Get some plexiglass and mount it on a Mic stand and play into that. I don't think in a larger venue that there would be a problem with the volume of a sax that is NOT using a microphone. In fact, you probably are going to have to use a Mic in a larger venue so........

Drummers.......
 

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I never thought I'd live to see the day!

We may not have won the war, but at least a small battle . Congratulations! :)

The problem with an e mute for band rehearsals would be that with normal headphones, nobody would hear you. Except you. Or you could wire the headphone socket to a small amp, but terribly complicated compared with just suggesting the drummer plays a little louder to blend as well.
Maybe give the drummer earplugs? I didn't think about what Pete said, the esax mute might be too effective haha. Maybe buy one and take a drill and make some modifications?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Seriously an E-Mute? A duvet over myself/horn? I will have to buy what I see on-line an find out myself then. I just want to keep the peace while I integrate myself in this working band until the drummer gets used to working with a horn player. I use my most closed HR GW slant link and am playing as quietly as possible but as I said the rehearsal room is small, and I am not using a microphone.

Thanks for the comedy though!

B
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Tell the drummer the STFU. Seriously, in a small room things are going to sound crappy.

Get some plexiglass and mount it on a Mic stand and play into that. I don't think in a larger venue that there would be a problem with the volume of a sax that is NOT using a microphone. In fact, you probably are going to have to use a Mic in a larger venue so........

Drummers.......
I find talking band mates like that only inflames the matter and is highly unprofessional. I am not really sure how old or experienced you are but that attitude towards other human beings is not effective in any realm. B
 

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To go along with Pete's idea... If you were to use a sweatshirt kind of like an e-mute, it might work. To clarify, I mean that you'd put your arms through the sleeve backwards, and have the horn inside the sweatshirt. I'd recommend inserts, but I see a difference in resistance as an issue, as you'll get used to playing that way, not on an uninhibited horn. I think the sweatshirt idea might be a good, cheap, quick fix for you, but I don't know to what extent it'll actually dampen the sound. Best of Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
To go along with Pete's idea... If you were to use a sweatshirt kind of like an e-mute, it might work. To clarify, I mean that you'd put your arms through the sleeve backwards, and have the horn inside the sweatshirt. I'd recommend inserts, but I see a difference in resistance as an issue, as you'll get used to playing that way, not on an uninhibited horn. I think the sweatshirt idea might be a good, cheap, quick fix for you, but I don't know to what extent it'll actually dampen the sound. Best of Luck!
This idea may work in theory but there is absolutely no way I would practice with professionals in this manner. This is some funny S&^T!

B
 

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Well, if nothing else will work, stand farther away from the drummer!
 

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I have the "saxmute" that goes inside the mouthpiece and neck. It's about 30 bucks, which seems like a lot for some oddly shaped loofah pieces, but it does cut your volume in half, and you can still blow normally.
 

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The proper reply to a drummer talking to you during a rehearsal is "What? I can't hear you. The cymbals are too loud."
 

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Like most of the comedians here I've never had a drummer tell me I'm playing too loud. To start with I'd suggest standing in front of and facing away from your drummer. Instead of using a mute I would work on playing with more focus, projection, and control while at the same time playing more softly. It takes a higher level of musicianship to play this way and it is good practice. You could also try adding some sound absorbing material to your rehearsal space to keep the sound from reflecting around as much. Invite someone with an objective viewpoint to one of your rehearsals and ask them if you sound unusually loud compared to the rest of the group. Buy the drummer heavier sticks :)
 

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Get yourself some of these http://www.clearsonic.com/ Either the SORBER panels or the clearsonic panels to cut down on direct sound transmission to the other musicians and cut reflections.
 

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Get yourself some of these http://www.clearsonic.com/ Either the SORBER panels or the clearsonic panels to cut down on direct sound transmission to the other musicians and cut reflections.
+1 on the Clearsonic Sorbers. They are super-portable, folding up, w/ handles - Nice!

http://www.clearsonic.com/sorber.htm

I own a Clearsonic Isopac H Iso Booth for practicing in my apartment and it works quite well, reducing my volume around 50%.

Best of Luck w/ this strange and rather unlikely situation! :dontknow: :)
 

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Hey, wait a minute. It's everyone's job to play in such a way as to blend. don't let the drummer lay it all off on you. And if he's a good friend, all the more reason to tell him to STFU.
 
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