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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
My bari is in need of a total overhaul. It is playable but it needs work. I am in need of a project and aside from the haynes manual are there any more things i can do to be successful with this project? I have done various repairs at shops ive worked at over the years, but ive never done a total rebuild.

Also anyone got suggestions for parts? I know about allied but i dont have an account or anything.

Thanks guys!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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In addition to the Haynes manual, this would be a good place to get some useful tips.

http://opensourcesaxophoneproject.com/saxophone-repair-page/

Music Medic would also be a good place to go for parts.

http://musicmedic.com

By "full overhaul" are you stating that the horn needs new pads, felts, corks, and a basic servicing, or does the horn require extensive dent or mechanical work? And the most important thing you can do in order to succeed is to ask for help. Just be sure to post pictures and describe any areas in which you get stumped. There are a lot of good techs on the board who will be able to give pointers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There were some serious dents a few years ago but they have been fixed. I also dont trust myself with that haha. But it needs pads felts and corks. Also its from the 50s and i dont think its been fully cleaned.

I was told keys off and some lukewarm water would work is that true?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here she is in the bath...


I was putting the keys back on (as im trying to keep this thing playable while overhauling it) and bent the top stack rod! Arghhhhh!!!!!! Going tomorrow to my friends shop to spin it back to playing condition.
 

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If the horn hadn't been cleaned in a very long time, and the keys are still off, I might suggest you take the body to the tech as well for a chem or sonic cleaning. Guess it depends upon what you see through the toneholes after the soap bath was done.

It's just that I always feel, once you have a body with all keys off...it's the perfect opportunity for as thorough a cleaning as possible.....

Is it a Beuscher ? King ? Early Conn ?
 

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Ask whatever you need, people will jump in with any info needed, best process get in and do it, which is what seems to be happening any way

Reading the post has motivated me to get of my *** and do one for myself, I have 3 bari's of which none play, have always been meaning to rebuild one, (just lack of time) and I am not a bari player, more of a tenor player than an alto player as well

Either way rambling..


Some goodies, now which one ???

Steve
 

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Fix them all, sell them and get a Yamaha.
You know, I have test played quite a few bari's after repair, and whilst I like yamaha custom tenors, mmm, the yamaha baris, just do not seem to do it for me,
 

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Here she is in the bath...


I was putting the keys back on (as im trying to keep this thing playable while overhauling it) and bent the top stack rod! Arghhhhh!!!!!! Going tomorrow to my friends shop to spin it back to playing condition.
Sometimes, its easier to simply make a replacement rod, see if your friend has some drill stock and just make one up, its an opportunity if the keys are loose on the rod to go up a size and ream the keys for smooth tight fit.

Steve
 

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I find rods straight very easily and quickly, using a bench motor, and a stick of hardwood with a hole through near one end.
 

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I find rods straight very easily and quickly, using a bench motor, and a stick of hardwood with a hole through near one end.
Agreed, but its a hard skill to learn. I had apprentices who after yrs, still could not do it.
 

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Agreed, but its a hard skill to learn. I had apprentices who after yrs, still could not do it.
I guess I have never had an apprentice do this, so I am not aware of how hard it might be.

When we can do something easily and well ourselves, then it is easy to call it "not rocket science", until we have a full picture of how many ways there are of failing at it.

You have just made me far more aware of the intricacies of applying forces just right in order to straighten a spinning rod.
 

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You know Gordon, when I first started out, I was so adamant about how easy things were, (but I had a mechanical apprenticeship background)it was not until you have to learn to train others that do not have a mechanical background, that you become aware how difficult some tasks actually can be.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Wow this thead blew up! I Took a day off or so.
I just fixed the rod with my drill and an old hammer handle. I could see how that would be difficult thankfully i have done a lot of stuff like that before. But I saw a good video on YouTube.

It is a 54ish King Zephyr. Ive had it for a year or so and have been meaning to have it overhauled but i have the time now so figured I would give it a try.

I am really enjoying the work so far, gives me a great sense of accomplishment. I think as I do more work ill post more pictures.

Anyone have any good suggestions for key oil? I just use some generic stuff.

Thanks again everyone! !
 
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