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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just got a new bari and the neck receiver acts like a tuning slide that hasn't been oiled in a decade. should i use slide oil or cork grease or something on the neck end or inside the bari?
 

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Generally a neck won't be as slick to insert and rotate/remove as a tuning slide on a brass instrument would be. BUT, it shouldn't give an unusual amount of resistance either.

Worst case scenario, a $25 tech job to perhaps tweak the tenon a bit (maybe sand it down a tad or put lapping compound on it to acclimate tenon to receiver) and/or check the receiver for roundness and make any necessary correction there.
 

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The neck joint should be clean of chemicals. Certainly don’t apply oil or anything. if it’s not fitting we’ll once cleaned, this is a very simple job for a tech to fix.
 

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Both parts should be squeaky clean and free of oils or grease. Denatured alcohol, naptha (lighter fluid), or Windex with ammonia all do a good job. Loosen the tightening screw and insert the neck slowly turning back and forth slightly as you push it in. It is ok if there is a bit of resistance, but you should not need to force it. If it is still difficult to put together follow Jaye's advice and take it to a tech to be re-fit.
 

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Guto and saxoclese just beat me to it while I was typing, but I'll concur with them that it's not a good idea to put cork grease, oil, or any other substance on the neck tenon or receiver. That will only result in attracting dirt & dust making the situation worse in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Guto and saxoclese just beat me to it while I was typing, but I'll concur with them that it's not a good idea to put cork grease, oil, or any other substance on the neck tenon or receiver. That will only result in attracting dirt & dust making the situation worse in the long run.
got it, thanks
 

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I had an extremely reputable guy 20 years ago tell me that you can clean the neck receiver surface real good, then "color" on it with a regular pencil....the graphite lubricates it but does not attract dust/etc. This guy has been on recordings with Elton John, Matchbox 20, Ohio Players etc.....so I tended to trust him....and yes it does work.
 
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Guto and saxoclese just beat me to it while I was typing, but I'll concur with them that it's not a good idea to put cork grease, oil, or any other substance on the neck tenon or receiver. That will only result in attracting dirt & dust making the situation worse in the long run.
Completely true.

The ONLY situation where I'd say this was "OK to do" would be in a troubleshoot context ...IOW...everything had been going just fine - then you pull out the horn for a lesson, practice, or performance, and all of a sudden (after taking the neck tightening screw into account)....it WON'T slide in nicely.

Yes, somethin' happened in between the time you played it last and now...but if you gotta get than neck on that horn NOW - key oil, cork grease, vaseline....use whatever to make it work.
Afterward wipe off all residue from both as best you can, then get to a tech so you don't have to repeat the procedure next time you play.

But given this isn't the situation, if the above suggestions posted by others don't help, go to a tech now.
 

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I had an extremely reputable guy 20 years ago tell me that you can clean the neck receiver surface real good, then "color" on it with a regular pencil....the graphite lubricates it but does not attract dust/etc. This guy has been on recordings with Elton John, Matchbox 20, Ohio Players etc.....so I tended to trust him....and yes it does work.
Lubricating that joint tends to require more force on the neck screw to secure the neck from rotating - leading to damage of the receiver. I would not look to recording credits when evaluating repair tech abilities.
 
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