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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

I have an old HR mouthpiece that's gone brown and has that nasty, sour taste that old rubber tends to acquire. Just wondering if there are any documented health effects associated with whatever causes this taste (sulphur, I would assume)? Any info would be most appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

MF
 

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There are at least another 2 threads about this taste smell AND heath implications (about taste and smell there are many more), there is no conclusive evidence that it may harm you only vague guesses.

I would strongly advise to look things up in the archives, most questions have been already put, there is no shame in continuing and old thread , helps keep people up to date (they will get an alert that a new post has been published on an item of interest ) and keeps information searchable and in one place. Even simply looking up on google the words ebonite sulphur and cancer returns threads in this forum.

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?119805-Stinky-Selmer-Soloist

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?99947-Mouthpiece-Safety

Evidence connected to ebonite used in smoking pipes is also dubious because of course, people SMOKE with pipes and that causes cancer.
 

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Ah, the old hard rubber tasting like rubber syndrome. Mostly everything you put in your mouth tastes like something. Why would rubber be any different? The first time I tried a Wanne Gaia I immediately smelled and tasted the rubber. I said to myself, self, this thing is made from real rubber! Then I bought the mouthpiece. Rubber tastes like rubber, get over it.
 

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Send it to me. A shot of shot of bourbon before, and during, playing it gets rid of that smell. Or else you don’t care about the smell. I’m not really sure exactly which comes first.
 

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Wash the mouthpiece with 'Lime-Away', available at grocery stores and home centers, using a toothbrush on the insides. After drying, spray it down with 'PAM' olive oil cooking spray, inside and out. After a few minutes, just wipe it dry with a piece of terry cloth. The mouthpiece will be clean and will look like new.
I use 'Ballistol', an organic lubricant that emulsifies with water. I wash the mouthpiece with a emulsion of Ballistol/water and wipe dry. It also restores the black appearance so its a one-step product.
You could go either way but I mentioned the first method because many people will already have these things in the home. You would have to get on Amazon or go to a sporting goods store to find Ballistol.
Either method will leave the mouthpiece looking more like new, usually with a little brown still showing in sunlight. This slight browning actually gives the mouthpiece a wonderful vintage patina that should be welcomed.
 

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I’ve had the pleasure of owning 2 very old mouth pieces. One was a very browned Remli which was the same vintage as the SBA it came with. The other is a not so brown Gregory from the 50s. First thing I did with the Remli was to get out a scrub brush. I think 1saxman has the best advice.....but make sure that if you use Lime-Away, you soak the piece in water for at least 10 minutes after you thoroughly rinse it off. Lime-away residues are not something you want to ingest
 

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I use 'Ballistol', an organic lubricant that emulsifies with water. I wash the mouthpiece with a emulsion of Ballistol/water and wipe dry. It also restores the black appearance so its a one-step product.
You could go either way but I mentioned the first method because many people will already have these things in the home. You would have to get on Amazon or go to a sporting goods store to find Ballistol.
Either method will leave the mouthpiece looking more like new, usually with a little brown still showing in sunlight. This slight browning actually gives the mouthpiece a wonderful vintage patina that should be welcomed.
I never thought to use Ballistol on a sax let alone a mouthpiece. Ballistol is revered by some in shooting sports as a gun cleaner. You learn something new every day here.

Lime-away residues are not something you want to ingest
This one I already knew - lol
 

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I use toothpaste, then olive oil, to clean an old mouthpiece.
 

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Clean it and then either olive oil or food grade mineral oil.

veggie oils tend to go rancid. Olive works well. The best is mineral oil but you will have to buy a good sized bottle and have it for life since it has limited uses.

Apply, let it sit a while and wipe off...you can even soak it for a good while.

...dry it off and see what happens...if its not good enough give more than one treatment.

the oli will help to seal it in.
 

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Rubber tastes like rubber, get over it.
Get over it, seriously? That's pretty dismissive & rude...no need for attitude in response to an honest question.

I play rubber on all my horns, have done so for almost 40 years now. Meyers, Selmers, Links, Vandorens, Ponzols, Zinners, Morgans; some old pieces, some new. They all smell & taste like rubber to one degree or another...I'm well acquainted with the beast. I wouldn't have asked the question if this particular recent acquisition wasn't noticeably (and disgustingly) different from all of the others. FYI the piece dates at least back to the early 70s, possibly further back than that.

Your TW piece is way too recent to have that taste or smell, so I'm assuming you probably aren't familiar with the exact taste I'm talking about.
 

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+ 1 on the olive oil. It is non invasive and non offensive to the mouthpiece. Beyond that, if you play it a lot you’ll get used to it


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Olive oil ( especially if exposed to a combination of air and sulphur vapors) can easily become rancid and develop an whiff of its own.

https://www.oliveoiltimes.com/olive-oil-basics/good-olive-oils-gone-bad/8900

“...How long it takes an olive oil to go from one end of this freshness continuum to the other depends on many factors: storage temperature, exposure to air and light, and the amount of natural antioxidants in the olive oil in the first place. All olive oils, even the finest ones, will get rancid eventually..."
 

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Olive oil ( especially if exposed to a combination of air and sulphur vapors) can easily become rancid and develop an whiff of its own.

https://www.oliveoiltimes.com/olive-oil-basics/good-olive-oils-gone-bad/8900

“...How long it takes an olive oil to go from one end of this freshness continuum to the other depends on many factors: storage temperature, exposure to air and light, and the amount of natural antioxidants in the olive oil in the first place. All olive oils, even the finest ones, will get rancid eventually..."
I don’t think anyone is planning on using olive oil for consumption after cleaning a mouthpiece with it..... just a tablespoon or so will do the trick.


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Ah, the old hard rubber tasting like rubber syndrome. Mostly everything you put in your mouth tastes like something. Why would rubber be any different? The first time I tried a Wanne Gaia I immediately smelled and tasted the rubber. I said to myself, self, this thing is made from real rubber! Then I bought the mouthpiece. Rubber tastes like rubber, get over it.
Guess what, tho ? MOST rubber mouthpieces....do not taste like anything. Even old ones. Some do, but most do not.

So if a guy has a rubber mouthpiece and it has a strong enough taste to be particularly unpleasant...I fail to see an issue with inquiring as to whether a) this is dangerous or b) whether that taste can be diminished or done away with altogether.
 

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I like the toothpaste recommendation. I just read a thread about excessive calcium build on a mouthpiece and now this thread. The human mouth is generally nasty as hell. I mean nasty.
I will never forget the first time that I tasted the Queen of Egypt's mouth. Her teeth, tongue, and gums were absolutely divine. She had the cleanest and most delicious mouth that I've ever experienced. Thank you for sparking an amazing old memory.
 
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