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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2008
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Discussion Starter #1
This is what my previous teacher (before I left for college) had me doing for years.

(qtr=80,100,120,140,160)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 (1 and 8 quarter notes, all others 1/8 notes, 2X)
1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 (1/16 notes, 4X)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 (1/16 notes, 2X)
1 3 5 3 1 (1/8 note triplet, 4X)
1 3 5 7 5 3 1 (1/4 note triplet, 4X)
1 3 5 7 9 7 5 3 1 (1/8 notes, 4X)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 5 3 1 (1/8 notes, 2X)
1 3 5 7 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 (1/8 notes, 2X)
1 7 5 3 2 8 6 4 3 9 7 5 4 10 8 6 5 11 9 7 6 12 10 8 7 13 11 9 8 1 (1/8 notes, 1X)
1 3 2 4 3 5 4 6 5 7 6 8 7 9 8 6 7 5 6 4 5 3 4 2 3 1 (1/8 notes, 1X)


This was done for every scale major and minor scale. My fingers are certainly more accustomed to runs now! (these were also done on clarinet)

Of course, these were introduced gradually, along with an explanation as to what I was doing, and where it might come in useful.

Anybody ever do anything similar?
 

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all 2 octave

Major scale 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Major triad (tonic) 1 3 5 1 3 5 8 5 3 8 5 3 1
Major triad (IV second inversion) 1 4 6 1 4 6 8 6 4 8 6 4 1
Fully diminished 1 b3 b5 6 1 b3 b5 6 8 6 b5 b3 8 6 b5 b3 1
Tonic 7 chord with Flatted 7 (V7 of next key) 1 3 5 b7 1 3 5 b7 8 b7 5 3 8 b7 5 3 1

A good warm up for any instrument. Take it to 3 octaves when you're comfortable.
and repeat.
 

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Try doing full range melodic minor, major and harmonic minor scales back to back in one breath. It is killer.
 

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Then take out the EWI and run these for eight octaves. :)
 

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Aebersold...
Up the scale down the chord
1 2 3 4 | 5 6 7 8 | 9 7 5 3 | 1

and...
up the chord, down the scale
1 3 5 7 | 9 8 7 6 | 5 4 3 2 | 1

{edit : I see Ianhart has included this sequence already}

Martinman said:
Try doing full range melodic minor, major and harmonic minor scales back to back in one breath. It is killer.
I thought it was meant to be enjoyable :? :D
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2008
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Discussion Starter #6
Woohoo! More things to practice!

My current teacher at UOP (David Henderson) has me doing my scales in one breath, sixteenth notes, different articulations (slurred, then slur two staccato two, then staccato), full range, ending on a whole note with full vibrato.

Which I realize is VERY similar to what Martinman has suggested!

Also, thanks Carl! I should definitely be doing more than just major and inor versions of my scales. Whole tone scales, diminished, etc. are all just as important and prevalent in modern music, right?
 

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I've finally come to the realization (it only took me about 25 years or so) that I have to practice scales every which way I can think of. So I will usually run one octave, than two, than full range of the horn, then I'll invent scale patterns to work on. Here's a few I find especially useful:

I do this one throughout the range, and then reverse it. It's also great chromatically:
1 2 3 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 (etc.)

Work on this one in reverse, too--it's a great way to tell how well you actually know a scale:
1 4 3 2 5 4 3 6 5 4 7 6 5 8 7 6 9 8 7 8

Right now I'm trying to get diminished whole tone scales nailed down... they're turning out to be a bit of a challenge.

-Leanne
 

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Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
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ianhart said:
I should definitely be doing more than just major and minor versions of my scales. Whole tone scales, diminished, etc. are all just as important and prevalent in modern music, right?
Others will have different views on this, of course. But i still think getting major/minor (various version)/chromatic sorted is the most important thing. There are literally thousands of patterns within each scale. To have all that totally down in 12 keys is pretty unusual even (maybe?) for college players.

Having said that, whole tone/diminished would be a superb addition to your repertoire and there's some great sounds in there. I suppose what i'm saying is don't neglect the "basics" because they can go off and there's always room for improvement.

IMHO.
 
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