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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, today I'd like to share some warmup exercises that works great for me. Hopefully you will find it usefull as well. I'm also curious what do you think about warmup.
Is it important to you or would you rather just grab the horn and play?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V37L8Bx3FEk

Have a nice weekend!
 

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Warm-up certainly is beneficial, there is no debate on that, but if you're talking about a practice session, part of it is the warm-up. It is very difficult to go out on a gig and play 'cold' but those of us in the real world have had to do it thousands of times.
 

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Yeah totally on the warm up wagon, both technical and embouchure etc. Nice exercise - classical guys love this sorta stuff. Eddie Harris has all sorts of weird exercises in his book The Intervallistic concept! If you ever get a chance to, check it out.


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Some nice ideas, thanks.

IMHO, as a B&i learner, I've found it very useful to include in the warm-up, whatever tones, patterns etc. to focus on: being relaxed, good posture, keeping the fingers a comfortable distance (not flying away etc). Sure these things are said by teachers and teaching materials, but rarely mentioned in the context of warmup exercises, I guess because they aren't a problem for better players. Still, including them, for those of us who need to, on the warm-up helps the rest of the session go better...
 

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I make it a point to warm up as little as possible on a job. Blow three notes on the mouthpiece to make sure the reed is right, and then three more with the mouthpiece on the horn; maybe low Bb, middle Bb and high Bb. Then check to make sure no keys are stuck. It drives me nuts how some players think they've got to basically play a whole song to warm up, or even worse, when they noodle along to the house music.
 

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I like the chromatic finger exercise you put in. My Warm up depends on what needs work. When Students of mine have a new (hard) scale like a C# or F# I'll have them use that as a warm up, doing long tones on the notes. Very slow intervals with it, etc. I was doing a time warm up for awhile where I'd play synchopated 16th off beats for 5 minutes just to hyper focus on time. I hate do do long tones but when I do do them everyday, my control gets better, Same with overtones, when I do them I get better Altisimo register. Hate scales but when I do them daily my speed and sense of time gets better. I warm up to my current needs I guess is what Im saying. Your warm up covers alot. K
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Warm-up certainly is beneficial, there is no debate on that, but if you're talking about a practice session, part of it is the warm-up. It is very difficult to go out on a gig and play 'cold' but those of us in the real world have had to do it thousands of times.
Yeah sometimes there is no time to warmup properly but I feel much more comfortable even if I do these exercises before leaving home, not necessarilly just before the show.
 

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Yeah totally on the warm up wagon, both technical and embouchure etc. Nice exercise - classical guys love this sorta stuff. Eddie Harris has all sorts of weird exercises in his book The Intervallistic concept! If you ever get a chance to, check it out.


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Cool, never heard about this book. I'll check it out. Thanks
 

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two things I am against are long tones, and For jazz playing in particular, the concept of “warm-up” for saxophone.

Certain things that are done as warm-ups should not be seen as warm ups, they should be seen as just a part of ”playing.” These are playing scales with a metronome, which is very very important for everybody. Brass players need to do warm-ups for their chops, but saxophonists don’t have to warm up their chops. Totally unnecessary and a waste of time.

Saxophonist in general warm up simply by playing. Jazz musicians should get straight into the meat of their creative process And not waste time on silly warm-up. What ever you happen to be working on, melodic material, improvisational concepts and ideas, stylistic things from the blues to all styles of jazz, transcribing music and solos, and generally doing intellectually engaging and interesting stuff. Life is too short to do silly saxophone warm-ups.

From what I’ve heard, in academic settings professors are always telling your students to do warm-ups, I think this is a big delusion.
 

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two things I am against are long tones, and For jazz playing in particular, the concept of “warm-up” for saxophone.

Certain things that are done as warm-ups should not be seen as warm ups, they should be seen as just a part of ”playing.” These are playing scales with a metronome, which is very very important for everybody. Brass players need to do warm-ups for their chops, but saxophonists don’t have to warm up their chops. Totally unnecessary and a waste of time.

Saxophonist in general warm up simply by playing. Jazz musicians should get straight into the meat of their creative process And not waste time on silly warm-up. What ever you happen to be working on, melodic material, improvisational concepts and ideas, stylistic things from the blues to all styles of jazz, transcribing music and solos, and generally doing intellectually engaging and interesting stuff. Life is too short to do silly saxophone warm-ups.

From what I’ve heard, in academic settings professors are always telling your students to do warm-ups, I think this is a big delusion.
Doing long tones/overtones has been a very important part of my practice routine. I believe playing them everyday is very important. Often time when we are practicing other things we aren't paying attention to our sound as much as we do when practicing long tones. For me, best way to do this is has been to play each tone slowly/as long as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Doing long tones/overtones has been a very important part of my practice routine. I believe playing them everyday is very important. Often time when we are practicing other things we aren't paying attention to our sound as much as we do when practicing long tones. For me, best way to do this is has been to play each tone slowly/as long as possible.
I also think that long tones and overtones are the best exercises for achieving a beautiful saxophone sound. Hearing it from such a great player means I'm not mistaken.
 

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Doing long tones/overtones has been a very important part of my practice routine. I believe playing them everyday is very important. Often time when we are practicing other things we aren't paying attention to our sound as much as we do when practicing long tones. For me, best way to do this is has been to play each tone slowly/as long as possible.
Hi Jaleel,
I am a big fan of yours. Have enjoyed seeing and hearing you lies several times around NY. I simply don’t have the discipline or patience for Long tones, it feels like I’m giving myself a lobotomy. That being said I am very much into paying attention to sculpting my sound and refining The expressiveness and beauty of my tone. I preferred to do it in what for me is the meaning for context, so I can combine skills and enjoy myself.

So here’s what I do, I take a ballad or slow pop tune and play it in a difficult key with metronome, iRealPro or similar backing track. Today I was going through “You Don’t Know a What Love is” in some more difficulties playing slowly and come binding lose with long tone-like sustained notes...It works for me.
 
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Are we talking about warmup or practice? I think of warmup as what you do when you arrive at a gig and get ready to play. I usually don't have the luxury of half an hour of long tones, nor should I be making a lot of noise backstage. That would also wear out my chops before I even started to play what could be a 3 hour show.

I agree that long tones are an essential step in developing a good sound. But that step usually happens very early in the learning process. So I did long tones when I was 11 years old for a while until my sound was well developed. Once I reached that milestone, there was no need to do them anymore. Actual practice and performance reinforces the muscle memory required to maintain my tone without the need to practice long tones separately.

As others have said, brass players absolutely need to warm up, but sax players don't. I do try to warm up on flute because my embouchure needs it.
 

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Pre-gig warmup for me means making sure the reeds are wet, secure and lined up properly. I make sure G# and low C# aren't sticking and I blow a few notes, maybe a couple of scales and arpeggios off stage. Done............and absolutely no practicing on stage before the gig. That's a pet peeve of mine. Warmup not required at home for practicing. Just practice.
 

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Pre-gig warmup for me means making sure the reeds are wet, secure and lined up properly. I make sure G# and low C# aren't sticking and I blow a few notes, maybe a couple of scales and arpeggios off stage. Done............and absolutely no practicing on stage before the gig. That's a pet peeve of mine. Warmup not required at home for practicing. Just practice.
That's basically my take on it also. Warm up at the gig is mostly to make sure the reed is working properly. I generally play a few lines very softly which will tell me all I need to know.

As to practicing, the beginning of the practice is the warm up, regardless of what I'm practicing, which might include long tones, scales, arpeggios, ii-V licks, tunes, or just noodling around...

Having said all that I like those diminished lines the OP provided in the video clip; I'd practice them more as a technical exercise than a warm up, but they obviously could function either way. I rarely play just the mpc alone; I realize it might be of some value but it grates on my nerves, so that's not part of my warm up or practice routine. Everyone has to find their own path.
 

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Hi Jaleel,
I am a big fan of yours. Have enjoyed seeing and hearing you lies several times around NY. I simply don’t have the discipline or patience for Long tones, it feels like I’m giving myself a lobotomy. That being said I am very much into paying attention to sculpting my sound and refining The expressiveness and beauty of my tone. I preferred to do it in what for me is the meaning for context, so I can combine skills and enjoy myself.

So here’s what I do, I take a ballad or slow pop tune and play it in a difficult key with metronome, iRealPro or similar backing track. Today I was going through “You Don’t Know a What Love is” in some more difficulties playing slowly and come binding lose with long tone-like sustained notes...It works for me.
Hi Nate.

Sorry for the late response. If you do for your sound works, that's all that matters. I never knock anything until I've tried it. Maybe I'll give this exercise a try one day..
 
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