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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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Yes, vid page says "you need permission"

My B and B flat key are opening up the G sharp pad. Im not sure what caused this but im going back to school soon and i need help quick. Here's a video of the damage:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1AFc9PpokLleUdrAM4eLvirnnU1nZTwg0/view?usp=drivesdk
Yes, so what is happening is your G# touch is linked to your B, Bb and probably C# touches, meaning you can play a G# using the G# touch or any of those other touches.

So when you press down the low B or Bb to play the low notes, it is activating the G# touch, which of course is connected to the G# keycup.

In order to prevent the G# cup from opening, there is that arm coming off the F# keycup extending over the G# keycup. There is a piece of cork on the underside of that arm (or it may be a piece of felt) which keeps the G# keycup closed when the G# touch is depressed.

Sometimes there is an adjusting screw there as well, with cork attached to underside of screw.

So first off tell us, with all keys open (not the G# of course), can you see a piece of felt or cork attached on the underside of the F# armature above the G# keycup ? If there is one there, good. If NOT, then what happened is somehow that cork or felt fell off; and in its absence the G# cup now opens a bit when the B and Bb are engaged.
 

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In order to prevent the G# from opening when the table keys are depressed, you have to have at least one of the RH stack keys depressed. IOW, if you finger low B normally, the right hand is down and the G# can't open. It could still open a little if it needs an adjustment as stated above.
 

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The video shows exactly what is supposed to happen. When you press the low B or Bb touch it also presses down the G# touch to open the G# key. The problem occurs when the right hand keys are closed and the G# key raises slightly when the low B or Bb are fingered. There is an arm that extends from the F# key or its hinge tube that has adjusting screws to close both the G# and the Bis when the right hand keys are down.
 

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While Low B okr Bb is pressed, press down the F key. That should re-close the G# key. That is normal - on most saxes.
If F does not quite close the G# pad, then adjustment is needed. (If there is a screw, turn it clockwise)
If G# closes before the F and F# pads, then anticlockwise adjustment is needed.
 

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Did you guys not watch the video? He's pushing on the B with no right hand on the sax - the G# is fully opening as expected. This is ignorance, not a leak.
 

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indeed, it is is surprising to see that people start paying attention on what happens to the saxophone sometimes after years of playing
 

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Did you guys not watch the video? He's pushing on the B with no right hand on the sax - the G# is fully opening as expected. This is ignorance, not a leak.
Yes, I watched the video. And without labelling it "ignorance", which is unhelpful, I tired to inform.
We all have areas of ignorance.

As the saying goes, "He who knows not, and knows that he knows not [i.e. asks somebody] is a student. Teach him"
 

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I can’t count the times that someone discovered that the top octave key isn’t always moving and alternates with a side octave which they never noticed or that operating the plateau keys will also always open the G# (unless you have a horn with special features)
 

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Yes, I watched the video. And without labelling it "ignorance", which is unhelpful,
We all have areas of ignorance.

As the saying goes, "He who knows not, and knows that he knows not [i.e. asks somebody] is a student. Teach him"
Exactly. If, in everyday playing, a student only hits the low table keys when playing those low notes (the lower stack keys all depressed), why would they 'naturally' assume or know the G# keycup is engaged and moving if not for something holding it down ?
 

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If this horn is owned by your school it should be covered under a repair contract. Take it to the shop that services your school.
If it's a personal horn that you use at school take it to your usual shop.
A tech can diagnose and repair this anomaly quickly and get you back playing at little to no cost to you. 😉
 

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If this horn is owned by your school it should be covered under a repair contract. Take it to the shop that services your school.
If it's a personal horn that you use at school take it to your usual shop.
A tech can diagnose and repair this anomaly quickly and get you back playing at little to no cost to you. 😉
Probably you haven’t read this well, there is nothing that OP describes that needs fixing depressing those keys automatically opens the G# , this is normal

The video shows exactly what is supposed to happen. When you press the low B or Bb touch it also presses down the G# touch to open the G# key. The problem occurs when the right hand keys are closed and the G# key raises slightly when the low B or Bb are fingered. There is an arm that extends from the F# key or its hinge tube that has adjusting screws to close both the G# and the Bis when the right hand keys are down.
[video]https://drive.google.com/file/d/1AFc9PpokLleUdrAM4eLvirnnU1nZTwg0/view[/video]
 

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If this horn is owned by your school it should be covered under a repair contract. Take it to the shop that services your school.
If it's a personal horn that you use at school take it to your usual shop.
A tech can diagnose and repair this anomaly quickly and get you back playing at little to no cost to you. 😉
I have been on both sides of the repair counter, first as a band teacher and second as a repair tech. At least in the state of Utah that I am familiar with there are no "automatic" repair contracts for school owned instruments. In most cases the teacher needs to bring an instrument to the repair shop (or send it with the store's "road rep") along with a purchase order.

Individual students who bring in school instruments that they expect the school to cover the cost of repairs often open a real can of worms. Without knowledge or permission from the band director or a signed purchase order, the student or the student's parents may end up footing the bill. Another system that is being implemented more and more in my state is that the school does not charge a yearly "rental fee", but the parents of the student using the instrument are obligated to pay for any repairs needed during the year. Often it comes out about the same cost either way.
 

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I have been on both sides of the repair counter, first as a band teacher and second as a repair tech. At least in the state of Utah that I am familiar with there are no "automatic" repair contracts for school owned instruments. In most cases the teacher needs to bring an instrument to the repair shop (or send it with the store's "road rep") along with a purchase order.

Individual students who bring in school instruments that they expect the school to cover the cost of repairs often open a real can of worms. Without knowledge or permission from the band director or a signed purchase order, the student or the student's parents may end up footing the bill. Another system that is being implemented more and more in my state is that the school does not charge a yearly "rental fee", but the parents of the student using the instrument are obligated to pay for any repairs needed during the year. Often it comes out about the same cost either way.
The school that my daughters attended has repair contracts on every 'school owned' instrument in use.
It does not have to go through the director. If the serial number is currently on file under which horns are in use, it gets fixed.
This list is updated yearly, as old ones are retired from active duty or traded in, and new are added.
Just because the schools you are familiar with in Utah don't do this doesn't mean that other schools, in other communities, or states don't.
 

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Probably you haven’t read this well, there is nothing that OP describes that needs fixing depressing those keys automatically opens the G# , this is normal



[video]https://drive.google.com/file/d/1AFc9PpokLleUdrAM4eLvirnnU1nZTwg0/view[/video]
The discovery was 'disturbing' to the OP. If a trip to the shop would confirm that everything was 'normal' it would be helpful, and put the mind at ease.
Learning first hand from a tech is better than a bunch of guys/strangers saying it's supposed to do that.
 

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... Another system that is being implemented more and more in my state is that the school does not charge a yearly "rental fee", but the parents of the student using the instrument are obligated to pay for any repairs needed during the year. Often it comes out about the same cost either way.
I consider that to be a very unfair system. If a particular student happens to be using an instrument that happens to have been badly neglected (by school/player/technician) over a long period prior to him/her using it, such that a whole heap of issues happen to emerge while in the custody of such student, then that student pays? No way! Unfair!

When I meet this situation I often write on the invoice that there was no way that the current user was responsible for the sad state of the instrument that needed such a lot of attention.

When the instrument reaches a state of needing a complete overhaul/repad, does the current student pay? No way!!!
This system is particularly unfair when the school buys crappy instruments that need a large heap of on-going attention because of congenital issues.

On the other hand, when a hireage fee is charged, that implies an insurance scheme where the instrument is covered when substantial long-term attention or replacement is required. That is fair.
 

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The school that my daughters attended has repair contracts on every 'school owned' instrument in use.
It does not have to go through the director. If the serial number is currently on file under which horns are in use, it gets fixed.
This list is updated yearly, as old ones are retired from active duty or traded in, and new are added.
Just because the schools you are familiar with in Utah don't do this doesn't mean that other schools, in other communities, or states don't.
Be grateful you don't live in a state that consistently ranks at the bottom for "per pupil funding". :) I have actually heard of these "open purchase orders" that school districts have with repair shops. They always have a yearly limit. One drawback to the system you describe in Lake Odessa I can see is that without the knowledge or approval of the band director, a student who is overly careless or maliciously damages and instrument could keep getting it repaired over and over at the school's expense. The cost for repairs of this type should be the responsibility of the parents and not the school system.

Gordon NZ I agree completely with your statement. Ideally for that system to be fair, the school instrument in question needs to be in top playing condition when it is "rented out". Unfortunately the lack of school funding in my area often dictates that band teachers are forced to request that the bare minimum of repairs are done to each instrument to just keep it "limping along" for another school year. It is especially frustrating for a band teacher to work under these conditions while the football team gets new uniforms and equipment every year. In some ways I am happy to be retired from teaching.
 
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