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What are some causes that makes my notes come out slow and long and not quick? what are some tips on improving?

also I was told that I should never stop the air flow when playing... How do I pause? while playing?

I also recorded my self and I notice I move alot. How do I train not to move as much? When I stand I play better than sitting..
 

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also I was told that I should never stop the air flow when playing... How do I pause? while playing?
From what my teacher has told me, and I've been working on...to produce sound I used to hit the reed with my tongue and then blow. now I'm trying to do the reverse by touching the tip of the reedd with my tongue and have the airflow ready so that when I remove the tip of my tongue from the reed the sound comes out immediately. Ideally, I think, you'd pause by stopping the reed with the tip of your tongue and yet having the air support ready to produce the next note.
 

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From what my teacher has told me, and I've been working on...to produce sound I used to hit the reed with my tongue and then blow. now I'm trying to do the reverse by touching the tip of the reedd with my tongue and have the airflow ready so that when I remove the tip of my tongue from the reed the sound comes out immediately. Ideally, I think, you'd pause by stopping the reed with the tip of your tongue and yet having the air support ready to produce the next note.

I'll keep that in mind, thanks for the tip. I did read up the whole tongue thing but I find myself throwing the whole tongue out the mouth lol also I tend to take long pauses after a long steady blow. I can play a note for 25 sec and than I'm out of breath for a good 8 sec I hate it lol
 

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changed my mind....
 

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also I was told that I should never stop the air flow when playing... How do I pause? while playing?
You block the airflow by placing your tongue against the tip of the reed/mouthpiece. (On or close to the tip of your tongue).

When you release your tongue, the air flows past the reed into the mouthpiece again. This is one of the most important parts of getting a good sound and style of playing.
 

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Can you guys sing LALALALALA?
Tonguing uses the same "basic" technique.
Instead of touching your tongue to the back of your teeth, you touch the tip of the reed.
Think "SING" while you tongue and you should start making better progress.
 

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I like the singing analogy, Bandmommy. These are some other techniques that I found effective in my teaching.

The air feels as if it is blowing the tongue out of the way. Take a big breath and imagine spitting small grains of rice off the tip of the tongue. Do dozens on the same breath of air. Imitate a "Rain-Bird" sprinkler making the "tsst", "tsst", 'tsst", sound over and over again. That is how the tongue feels when tonguing several tones on the same breath. Play a long tone and make the tongue go "tu", "tu", "tu" using the same motion of the tongue, still on one long breath/stream of air.

The teacher needs to watch for:
- tonguing with the air "hoo", "hoo", "hoo"
- stopping the tone with the tongue "tut", "tut", "tut"
- tonguing with the back of the tongue "guh", "guh", "guh", or "kuh", "kuh", "kuh"

If you can see any movement under the chin while tonguing:
- the student is moving too much of the tongue and/or
- moving the tongue too far inside the mouth

Playing in front of a mirror, playing B (E on clarinet), and holding free hand under chin to check for movement helps.
Teach the student the tip of the tongue moves like a "feather", and not like a "brick" inside the mouth.
 

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If you can see any movement under the chin while tonguing:
- the student is moving too much of the tongue and/or
- moving the tongue too far inside the mouth
I suffer from this actually. Well, the movement you see is closer to my neck than to my chin. Happens a lot when I'm playing short notes...staccato.
 

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I also recorded my self and I notice I move alot. How do I train not to move as much? When I stand I play better than sitting..
Nothing wrong with moving while you play. Put your effort into the air support that others have discussed above, and don't worry about moving while you play as long as it doesn't interfere with what you are playing.

I wouldn't say not to stop the air flow. After all, when you place your tongue on the reed you are stopping the air flow (even if only for a millisecond). What you actually want to do is maintain air support, keeping the air available. It's sort of like kinking a hose to stop the water; the instant you un-kink the hose, the water flows out. Similarly, the instant you release your tongue from the reed, the air flows. If you are tonguing notes in a quick passage, it will seem as though the air is moving in a steady stream, only punctuated by the tongue.
 

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I suffer from this actually. Well, the movement you see is closer to my neck than to my chin. Happens a lot when I'm playing short notes...staccato.
Staccato notes are not to be tongued 'hard'. They are only shorter versions of any other quarter note.
Think of them as 'bubbles popping'. Light and short.
Otherwise they sound like a stomping giant...
 

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Staccato notes are not to be tongued 'hard'. They are only shorter versions of any other quarter note.
Think of them as 'bubbles popping'. Light and short.
Otherwise they sound like a stomping giant...
I believe the problem with my staccato goes back to the fact that I'm still working on starting each note properly by having the air support ready and removing the tongue from the tip of the reed/mouthpiece. practice practice practice
 

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I see...
Pretty soon you'll get the hang of it.
One of these days everything will just click and you won't even have to think about what you're doing.
Then you'll sit there and think..."What was I worried about. This is EASY".
 

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I believe the problem with my staccato goes back to the fact that I'm still working on starting each note properly by having the air support ready and removing the tongue from the tip of the reed/mouthpiece. practice practice practice
Each note should be started properly whether it's staccato or tongued legato.

The only notes that aren't tongued are legato notes, in which cse the very first note of a legato passage is tongued, and the rest not (ie they are slurred). There are exceptions to this, but are more advanced techniques.
 
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