Sax on the Web Forum banner

41 - 60 of 62 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013-
Joined
·
5,431 Posts
And the reason I started with low amperage 12v DC. Lost a friend of mine years ago. Was installing a 6’ halogen lightbulb in his 300(yes300) gallon aquarium. He didn’t realize the switch was on. 62 and a engineer. It happens.
When I was in high school a neighbor killed himself using an electric-element charcoal starter. He was a master electrician specializing in high voltage, high amp, dangerous varieties. The witnesses all told me it went something like this: Trying the starter, "Hey I think this has a short. Must be the rain." Tries again. "Yep, I felt a tingle that time. I will dry it off." Tries again. "Now that time it was a jolt. What is wrong with this thing. Got it fixed now." Tries again. Dead.

That was household 220 overseas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,152 Posts
When I was in high school a neighbor killed himself using an electric-element charcoal starter. He was a master electrician specializing in high voltage, high amp, dangerous varieties. The witnesses all told me it went something like this: Trying the starter, "Hey I think this has a short. Must be the rain." Tries again. "Yep, I felt a tingle that time. I will dry it off." Tries again. "Now that time it was a jolt. What is wrong with this thing. Got it fixed now." Tries again. Dead.

That was household 220 overseas.
Wow, that sounds like a "hold my beer.....watch this" moment. Overconfidence can kill.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
One can never be to safe with electric appliances.


What sound does a sheep make when stuck by lightning ?

Zisss - Boom - Baaahh!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
33,185 Posts
Wow, that sounds like a "hold my beer.....watch this" moment. Overconfidence can kill.
Amen.

One of my electricians chose to ignore safe practices - likely because he was very experienced and had never had an incident - and got knocked off his ladder while he was working in the bus work of a cabinet that was running 3-phase, 450VAC. He got real lucky - and became a real advocate of safety rules after that.

Compassion to all who have experienced loss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I bought one from eBay, search for "1m Leak Light Repair Tools LED Light for Saxophone Clarinet WoodwindInstrumentMD"
works great but I agree with a previous post, the end cap has come off but only once. I added some contact cement.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
As luck would have it 6 of the 15 leds on one strip are going dim in the fish tank. Lasted about 5 years/18-20k hours. Time to redo and make a light stick I’ve been meaning to get to this month. Unucky for me the vendor I used is gone. The internet turned up a good replacement. Ordered an should arrive June 5th.

Actually this is better than what I previously used.
These have pigtails,waterproof and adhesive backing. 15 leds within 11-13/16(30cm) 12v @90mA.
Pack of 8 is $8.99USD.
If you need a transformer look at the other kits in listings. Not much technical information on actual light output.
If it’s enough to light a room a little bit it should light a tube of a saxophone OK. Anything greater than a 5K light source I would worry about China syndrome. If you’re old enough to know what movie that was. This is probably at most 2.5k light.

https://www.amazon.com/Zento-Deals-Flexible-Waterproof-Strips/dp/B07BK9YF53
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,098 Posts

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
Personally I use a bright, single location bulb.
Strip lights throw so much light out of every tone hole that it is easy to miss the small leaks. It sort of defeats the purpose of having a darkened room.

For checking timing, I reckon I've got good at pressing the key with the same pressure each time - for different pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
Personally I use a bright, single location bulb.
Strip lights throw so much light out of every tone hole that it is easy to miss the small leaks. It sort of defeats the purpose of having a darkened room.
Finally someone mentions that. I absolutely agree, it is a huge difference.
Nowadays we have lots of choices when it comes to light bulbs. Led is really the best option cause it is very powerful and still can remain cold, it is monochromatic for more accurate results and of course it is safe running on less than 12 Volts.
This is my version mounted on a very light aluminium tube that i can attach it to the saxophone and adjust the height accurately and securely to the pad I'm checking leaving both my hands free.

View attachment 235678
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
Finally someone mentions that. I absolutely agree, it is a huge difference.
Nowadays we have lots of choices when it comes to light bulbs. Led is really the best option cause it is very powerful and still can remain cold, it is monochromatic for more accurate results and of course it is safe running on less than 12 Volts.
This is my version mounted on a very light aluminium tube that i can attach it to the saxophone and adjust the height accurately and securely to the pad I'm checking leaving both my hands free.
I like that set up care to share the build of it? Beats using a clothes pin to hold the wire in place
Also see post 19 and 27. Many use a single light also.
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
I don't use a clothes peg. I use relatively stiff cable, and bend it at right angles to stop it going in too far for any given note. That takes 0.3 seconds. I need to change that cable every several years.
I jam a cork in to hold the cable when I am working on low C, because for that hole I tip the sax up the other way to work on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
I like that set up care to share the build of it? Beats using a clothes pin to hold the wire in place
Also see post 19 and 27. Many use a single light also.
Yes i did see that others use a single bulb on a cable but i felt was more like an arbitrary decision while Gordon made clear the advantages of doing so.
What i made was the result of an improvisation with the parts i found in the plumbing section at my local DIY store.
My basic idea was that the light bulb and its housing should be small enough so they can pass easily the octave tube inside the body. At the same time the light had to be powerful and still relatively cold. It is a g4 12volt type.
The brass fittings had to have the same diameter as the aluminium tube so there is no play. I found different parts and solder them together .
By molding a plastic piece outside the brass part i made something that is similar to the plug we use to the saxophone when we remove the neck to protect the octave mechanism. That allows the aluminium tube(and the light bulb) to be placed always at the middle and never touch the walls of the saxophone body so the light bulb doesnt move by gravity like it does when it is attached on a cable only.
I had to make a simple lathe by using a normal drill and a stand to turn some of the brass and the plastic piece.
It may sound overcomplicated but the results are really very good. It is very easy and very precise to use.
I have made a cable/bulb only that i still use for the bell pads but this is a big improvement over it.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
It may sound overcomplicated but the results are really very good.
Not really complicated just some extra effort. A G4 puts out some good light. I’m curious on the power source used and how long it is. If you’re working on the upper stack is the extra tube protruding cumbersome?
Also your comment and support to Gordon’s reasoning of being advantageous was spot on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
Not really complicated just some extra effort. A G4 puts out some good light. I’m curious on the power source used and how long it is. If you’re working on the upper stack is the extra tube protruding cumbersome?
Also your comment and support to Gordon’s reasoning of being advantageous was spot on.
You are right, not complicated but unnecessary is a better word.
The light bulb is 1.6 watts and 100 lumen and works with 12 volts ac or dc. There are even more powerful ones but that one is just fine and doesnt get too warm.
I power it with a cheap IKEA power supply .
It is made for tenor and it is a bit longer than the body.
The aluminium tube is so light and the plastic plug is long enough and fits snugly in the saxophone that i dont feel much torque to make it cumbersome in use when it is fully extended, but it needs the extra space around it. As i hold it vertically that is not a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,134 Posts
There is one aspect that hasn't been thoroughly discussed and that is the color or intensity of the light. I do most of my final pad work in a darkened room. At my age my eyes don't do well for long periods of time looking at the extreme brightness of LED lights in that setting. I find the less intense (warmer?) light of a 12" fluorescent bulb to be more comfortable and just as efficient. Of course, this is the method I have been using for nearly 20 years and is what I am most familiar with. Using the Votaw Sax Work Fixture the light is held in the desired location by inserting a rubber stopper into the end to secure the cord. I do have the Music Medic LED that I use to illuminate the low C tonehole and sometimes the bell keys on altos and tenors and for all bari sax repair where the light has to go through a lower tonehole. The problem with using the MM light for this purpose is the cord is too flimsy to be able to push the light up into the upper part of the stack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
There is one aspect that hasn't been thoroughly discussed and that is the color or intensity of the light. I do most of my final pad work in a darkened room. At my age my eyes don't do well for long periods of time looking at the extreme brightness of LED lights in that setting. I find the less intense (warmer?) light of a 12" fluorescent bulb to be more comfortable and just as efficient. Of course, this is the method I have been using for nearly 20 years and is what I am most familiar with. Using the Votaw Sax Work Fixture the light is held in the desired location by inserting a rubber stopper into the end to secure the cord. I do have the Music Medic LED that I use to illuminate the low C tonehole and sometimes the bell keys on altos and tenors and for all bari sax repair where the light has to go through a lower tonehole. The problem with using the MM light for this purpose is the cord is too flimsy to be able to push the light up into the upper part of the stack.

I was about to say that it is best to use a monochromatic source (as i mentioned to a previous post) of orange light with a wavelength of 587 to 589nm cause that is what they use to measure flatness but this doesnt seem to relate to what we do.
The colour and intensity dont seem to be that critical as long it is comfortable and practical to use and doesnt get too warm. I find that a bit powerful source, around 80 to 100 lumen, helps to see the leaks easier, provided that is a single bulb and not a column. Too strong and i get eye strain.
Also lots of Leds now are dimmable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Understood.

I, too, used to make similar contraptions.

In the safety community, one should also consider the "What if?" scenarios. In this instance, it would include a question of "What if the envelope of the lamp breaks?" If the glass of an incandescent or fluorescent bulb breaks, you then have electrodes exposed that are at an elevated potential (ie 120V or 220V).
...also it is NOT a certified device, time for all to consider what we are using for a leak light. Go modern, go LED!! I think I picked one up for $28. For those of you are fortunate enough to have a MK VI or similar, if you can keep that baby purring you should also consider doing the same for yourself and family!! Aside from that, no matter what the value of your horn is, it is certainly no where near the value for your health. Oh, one more mention. The light I have is wall outlet designed but can also be removed from the adapter and plugged into my laptop!! Pretty neat!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
I am sorry to hear about your close call.
Hey you guys do my Leek-Lite (TM) look like it might pose any danger to me if, say, I bust the lite-bulb down in the sax bore after taking a shower and standing on a wet basement floor?
By the way, if that happens and I survive (or not, and, say, you inherit the Leek-Lite (TM) from me), it says to use a radio panel lamp #44 for bulb replacement.
It's made by Karl's Nu-Way Mfg. Co. and if there's a safety issue I'll report it to them and I'm sure they'll jump right on it.
Thanks in advance.
View attachment 231616 View attachment 231618
Looks like the 50's? Do yourself a favor, get a new light and keep that one set aside for nostalgia's sake. First glance, there is no provisions for grounding the light, this is somewhat of a must but still do not offer full protection from receiving a shock unless you are plugged into a GFI receptacle which again requires the need of the ground wire in the cord which would make it a three wire cable. As it stands now, any exposed live wire/connection point and you having contact with it, if the conditions are correct, YOU will become the conductor for that contact for a path to earth/ground. ZAPPPP!!! Lights out!! No more sax!! THINK about it!!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
There is one aspect that hasn't been thoroughly discussed and that is the color or intensity of the light. I do most of my final pad work in a darkened room. At my age my eyes don't do well for long periods of time looking at the extreme brightness of LED lights in that setting. I find the less intense (warmer?) light of a 12" fluorescent bulb to be more comfortable and just as efficient. Of course, this is the method I have been using for nearly 20 years and is what I am most familiar with. Using the Votaw Sax Work Fixture the light is held in the desired location by inserting a rubber stopper into the end to secure the cord. I do have the Music Medic LED that I use to illuminate the low C tonehole and sometimes the bell keys on altos and tenors and for all bari sax repair where the light has to go through a lower tonehole. The problem with using the MM light for this purpose is the cord is too flimsy to be able to push the light up into the upper part of the stack.
Couldn’t agree with you more.
Proof that it all comes down to the right tool for the job. Having multiple light sources gives you flexibility to the task.
Like Liareggub mentioned. Some of these LED options are dimmable in 12v.
I’m actually planning on sanding the inside of the polycarbonate tube to diffuse the light some. That should smooth out some of the harshness of the glare from the LED. Using a piece of 60 grit emery cloth on a dowel with a drill motor like a hone.
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
... I’m actually planning on sanding the inside of the polycarbonate tube to diffuse the light some. That should smooth out some of the harshness of the glare from the LED. Using a piece of 60 grit emery cloth on a dowel with a drill motor like a hone.
Good idea. But I wonder if that might reflect enough light to make the LED overheat.
 
41 - 60 of 62 Posts
Top