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Distinguished SOTW Member
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Discussion Starter #1
Literally.
Today whilst checking for a leak in my Baritone, I got a nasty zap through my arm that almost caused me to drop my horn.
Luckily the jolt made me jerk just enough that it pulled the leak light from the socket.
After getting over the shock I looked for the cause and found that them heat shrink cap that was on the end of the light had come off leaving live wires bare in my horn.
Not low voltage either.
240 volts on a 20 amp circuit breaker.
I have since fixed the light in a way that it can’t happen again.
Just thought I’d post this as a reminder to check equipment, especially electrical equipment regularly before using.
This could have ended badly.
I will also be looking into a low voltage leak light to replace this one.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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Good call.

I don’t know which leak light you have.

I have still an old one with a 12V fluorescent tube with a built in transformator ,but there are now many low voltage LED ones.

Some time ago the Taiwanese company that I worked with showed up at a fair with a 220 LED and I told them that no way we were going to use that to check the horns at the Frankfurt show.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Good call.

I don’t know which leak light you have.

I have still an old one with a 12V fluorescent tube with a built in transformator ,but there are now many low voltage LED ones.

Some time ago the Taiwanese company that I worked with showed up at a fair with a 220 LED and I told them that no way we were going to use that to check the horns at the Frankfurt show.
I think I may just have the same light as that Taiwanese company.
 

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that was a straight rigid led 1m long. with connectors on one side. I thought long and hard on what to do with it after the show and never found something that I could use.

Since then there has been a serious development of the low tension Led rope lights. I think IKEA makes several solutions

https://www.ikea.com/au/en/catalog/products/30401223/
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Interesting.
I must admit I have never really looked into what is available.
I just bought one of the first ones I saw mainly because it was LED and seemed brighter than the crappy Music Medic rope light I had before.
 

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well, this ikea is not much of a muchness but like those there are more powerful ones.

I’d say that 90 lumen is ok but can be better. There are many products meant for under kitchen cupboards which would qualify. Some time ago I was looking for one for my new kitchen.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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You should always use a DC set-up, like an LED strip running off a transformer. If you're going to use AC, make sure its some kind of factory set-up that's safe. You might be sticking a 20 amp homemade device into a wet metal pipe - probably not the best idea. :)
 

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Literally.
Today whilst checking for a leak in my Baritone, I got a nasty zap through my arm that almost caused me to drop my horn.
Luckily the jolt made me jerk just enough that it pulled the leak light from the socket.
After getting over the shock I looked for the cause and found that them heat shrink cap that was on the end of the light had come off leaving live wires bare in my horn.
Not low voltage either.
240 volts on a 20 amp circuit breaker.
I have since fixed the light in a way that it can’t happen again.
Just thought I’d post this as a reminder to check equipment, especially electrical equipment regularly before using.
This could have ended badly.
I will also be looking into a low voltage leak light to replace this one.
A similar thing happened to me when using a leak light on a clarinet. I didn't get a shock but damaged the tenon cap on the top joint; put a nice pit in it. I think low voltage is the way to go. Good thing you or the horn are not damaged.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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32,933 Posts
Literally.
Today whilst checking for a leak in my Baritone, I got a nasty zap through my arm that almost caused me to drop my horn.
Luckily the jolt made me jerk just enough that it pulled the leak light from the socket.
After getting over the shock I looked for the cause and found that them heat shrink cap that was on the end of the light had come off leaving live wires bare in my horn.
Not low voltage either.
240 volts on a 20 amp circuit breaker.
I have since fixed the light in a way that it can’t happen again.
Just thought I’d post this as a reminder to check equipment, especially electrical equipment regularly before using.
This could have ended badly.
I will also be looking into a low voltage leak light to replace this one.
Low voltage is the only way to go. Tape is not sufficient, nor is heat shrink acceptable for something like this.

I was an electrical safety officer in the US Navy, among other duties. Please do be careful out there.



Re LED strip lights - I learned this past year, as we were designing lighting for a kitchen renovation that those individual LEDs can get extremely hot. Caution.

Thanks for sharing this experience. It is important that people learn from incidents such as yours, so they don't have to get shocked themselves - perhaps with worse outcome.
 

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The words of caution are well taken. However, I have been using 120V fluorescent leak lights for over 20 years with no problems or issues. The reason is I build my own cords and connectors which don't rely on plastic tape or shrink tubing for insulation. The photographs below show the fully insulated crimp wire connectors, and the box containing the ballast which is the power source.

View attachment 231602 View attachment 231604 View attachment 231606 View attachment 231608 View attachment 231610 View attachment 231612
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Understood.

I, too, used to make similar contraptions.

In the safety community, one should also consider the "What if?" scenarios. In this instance, it would include a question of "What if the envelope of the lamp breaks?" If the glass of an incandescent or fluorescent bulb breaks, you then have electrodes exposed that are at an elevated potential (ie 120V or 220V).
 

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Forum Contributor 2012, SOTW Saxophone Whisperer,
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As a repair tech, I just think that anything larger than 12 volts is unnecessary. Just a few years ago, at a NAPBIRT convention, a homemade leak light was shown. The Light it's self I think was an Alpena Diamond light (car strip led light hooked into a cheap 12 volt transformer. Now I don't think the Diamond light is available, but you can walk into Autozone and see a million of similar things.

Again I just feel more than 12 volts is unnecessary and dangerous.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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I am sorry to hear about your close call.
Hey you guys do my Leek-Lite (TM) look like it might pose any danger to me if, say, I bust the lite-bulb down in the sax bore after taking a shower and standing on a wet basement floor?
By the way, if that happens and I survive (or not, and, say, you inherit the Leek-Lite (TM) from me), it says to use a radio panel lamp #44 for bulb replacement.
It's made by Karl's Nu-Way Mfg. Co. and if there's a safety issue I'll report it to them and I'm sure they'll jump right on it.
Thanks in advance.
View attachment 231616 View attachment 231618
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Hey you guys do my Leek-Lite (TM) look like it might pose any danger to me if, say, I bust the lite-bulb down in the sax bore after taking a shower and standing on a wet basement floor?
No need for the shower or wet floor. Electrocution is a real threat. There is no need to take risks that are easily avoided.

You don't need to cook your internals to 165F to be done.


FWIW, I, too, have some cool archaic electronics, but I wouldn't use them in their present condition.
 
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