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Hey Cristiano, beautiful King! also the Bueschers, I noticed your pinky cluster is a little longer on the G# and low Bb than mine, it´s sligthly different than others King Bb sopranos/saxellos (where thr G# is oval shaped) but seems to be the same as this one C soprano on this King catalogue http://hnwhite.com/King/Saxophone page/1924 Sopranos Large.jpg
How it works the original piece?, I recall (as Mike Ward told me) the original saxello piece worked very well on his saxello.
 

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The original piece has a great tone, dark and smooth. It makes it play in tune without significant effort on almost all notes.
The only problem is that it is very closed, and has a lot of resistance. I am sending it to Joe @ soprano planet for refacing. He loves old King sopranos...
 

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What brand and reed strenght are using you on your C soprano? I am using #2 Vandoren or Gonzales reeds, but next time I will buy Gonzales #1.75 or 1.50 to give a try (I found it a little bit harder than Vandoren but I like them).
Yes, those old King sopranos are beautiful instruments, not to mention the saxello, my favourite.
 

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For me #3 is too hard, I play soft reeds, I can´t get use to play harder than 2,5, but I don´t want to anyway, because I am comfortable playing #2.
 

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I have owned various C sopranos but not a King. I love the Bb curvies though. When I was trying to find a proper C mouthpiece for a Conn, I had Theo Wanne send me a few to try. None of them helped the intonation although the King mouthpiece was quite good. I have a Martin now and for all the Cs I have owned the best mouthpieces have been the Yamahas in a 4C or 3C. The intonation is the best I have found and the sound is very nice. Since they are so cheap, you may want to get a 4C. If it touches the octave pad, you can just trim a bit off of it.
Nice find on the King! I want to try one someday. Some corrections you may want to address: On the Kings the G# lever often does not have a stop which can be annoying as your finger just keeps going after the pad opens. To correct, build up a cork (wine bottle) and glue it to the underside of the lever to make a stop on the body. Another fix that you may consider is taking the cork off of the palm Eb and slightly bending the lever up a little. Originally it is designed to open the D palm along with the Eb BUT if you want to play E and F or higher, this Eb key needs to open without the D key. A lever to body cork will need to be crafted to make a stop for the Eb lever. Then you can finger E by fingering G#2 and adding the palm Eb (only) and F by fingering A2 and the Eb palm. Since these notes are a bit hard to get out, I usually leave it factory with the Eb also opening the D.
 

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...On the Kings the G# lever often does not have a stop which can be annoying as your finger just keeps going after the pad opens....
Same on the C-Melody, although I just got a late 84K King C-Mel which has a factory fitted stop, so they obviously finally realised... Strange omission for saxophones which otherwise have Rolls-Royce mechanics ! I too want to try a King C-Sop, and the exchange rates are beginning to swing back to sanity, so I may just, one day...
 

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That king looks real nice there! I have heard a recording of one and they sound very nice... that vintage tone. I hope you are thoroughly enjoying it!
 

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I have a King C soprano serial number 74XXX. It has a left hand pinky cluster exactly like yours. In fact, the whole thing looks exactly like yours, including the case.

I really love it, mainly because of the beautiful tone.

When I first got it a few years ago, a bit of searching on the web made me date its manufacture to 1924, mainly because I found one on another site (could it have been Jason Dumars?) where a similarly-serial-numbered sax was labeled as 1924.

One of the nice things about this sax, by the way, is the relatively low position of the octave key opening, which means that whatever mouthpiece you use, it's not going to get hung up on it, so no sawed-off mouthpieces are necessary.

additional info - yes it was Jason Dumars's site. He engraved it in 2004 for a customer, and added a gold wash to the engraving. Nice work. The pictures are no longer on his site, but I saved them to my hard drive back then.
 

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One of the nice things about this sax, by the way, is the relatively low position of the octave key opening, which means that whatever mouthpiece you use, it's not going to get hung up on it, so no sawed-off mouthpieces are necessary.
QUOTE]

When I bought mine (serial #458xx) , one of the motives to pickup a King was the position of the octave pip as you mentioned on this thread http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?109231-How-useful-is-a-C-Soprano&highlight=c+soprano ,the other one was the comments about intonation you did also.
Thanks SuperTourist.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have owned various C sopranos but not a King. I love the Bb curvies though. When I was trying to find a proper C mouthpiece for a Conn, I had Theo Wanne send me a few to try. None of them helped the intonation although the King mouthpiece was quite good. I have a Martin now and for all the Cs I have owned the best mouthpieces have been the Yamahas in a 4C or 3C. The intonation is the best I have found and the sound is very nice. Since they are so cheap, you may want to get a 4C. If it touches the octave pad, you can just trim a bit off of it.
Nice find on the King! I want to try one someday. Some corrections you may want to address: On the Kings the G# lever often does not have a stop which can be annoying as your finger just keeps going after the pad opens. To correct, build up a cork (wine bottle) and glue it to the underside of the lever to make a stop on the body. Another fix that you may consider is taking the cork off of the palm Eb and slightly bending the lever up a little. Originally it is designed to open the D palm along with the Eb BUT if you want to play E and F or higher, this Eb key needs to open without the D key. A lever to body cork will need to be crafted to make a stop for the Eb lever. Then you can finger E by fingering G#2 and adding the palm Eb (only) and F by fingering A2 and the Eb palm. Since these notes are a bit hard to get out, I usually leave it factory with the Eb also opening the D.
Bruce,
thanks for the great tips. I bought the Yamaha 4C after reading some of your posts, and it works well form the intonation perspective and ease of playing it. The sound I get is (of course) different from the original mouthpiece. The original one is darker and smoother...
I need to play more with the 4C to explore the possibilities and decide if I like it as much as the original one.
It is great to have options.
I will check the mods you suggested when I am back home.

Cheers
 
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