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I own both the Yamaha 250 and the Leblanc Bliss 320. They are both great instruments with great pads and sturdy keywork.I exclusively use my Yamaha on all my gigs; and the Bliss is for my kid to learn the clarinet. The Yamaha has a bigger sound, I use it both for jazz and classica. I can make it work fine on both settingsl but I would say go with the Bliss, it will make a great starter since its smaller, its tone its well centered right from the start and you don't have to work your embpchure too much to make it happen. It is very sturdy and sounds great. Not as big or loud sounding as my Yamaha but rather pure and refined. I once took it to a jazz Band rehearsal and performed great. Its just a setup thing. I also believe they would be more consistent because of its backun bore design. Remember that you canalso do some extra tunning afterwards by changing barrels, rotating the bell's position, rotating the barrel's position, rotating both. I have my Bliss set up with a backun wooden barrel and I believe it sounds and feels fantastic. Very easy to hold and play for my six year old son. The Bliss is a good choice for success in learning the instrument.
 

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Play them both and get the one you like best.
Otherwise since you're just starting out get a Vito. More affordable, smaller tone holes to help with 'sax fingers', and every bit as 'nice' sounding as the Yamaha or Leblanc.
As for 'rotating' the barrel and bell to adjust tuning.... Ah, I believe that's bunk. I've got a LOT of clarinets and it makes absolutely NO difference in tuning where the cartuche is facing.... Back, front, left, right.... It still tunes exactly the same. ;)
 

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I don't know if rotating will have an effect on a plastic instrument, but there is actually a logical reason why people do it on wooden instruments. The bore changes a bit over time and will no longer be completely round. Rotating it will change the alignment and affect response and resonance. Allan Segal, who makes custom barrels http://www.clarinetconcepts.com/ has some comments about this on his site.

At the same time, I just line it up the same every time and play. I have enough other things to drive me crazy, I don't need to spend hours turning my barrels.
 

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When I'm not playing my PM clarinet I play my Yamaha-250. It was my first ever horn, and its what got me into music. The sound is really big. But play them both and see what you like.
 

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I've had the Bliss and the 250. Get the 250. As Arturo says, it's louder. It also feels better under the fingers. I use mine with a wooden barrel. With that, it almost sounds as good as top pro horn. By the way, the intonation is great too.
 

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I don't know if rotating will have an effect on a plastic instrument, but there is actually a logical reason why people do it on wooden instruments. The bore changes a bit over time and will no longer be completely round. Rotating it will change the alignment and affect response and resonance. Allan Segal, who makes custom barrels http://www.clarinetconcepts.com/ has some comments about this on his site.

Thanks for quoting me, Clarnut.
The rotation of the barrel works for wooden instruments. I would hope that hard rubber and plastic do not become ovoid. The reurected Chedeville line
HTML:
http://www.chedevillemp.com/barrel/
now has a barrel (designed by me:mrgreen: and I do not suggest turning it on its axis.
Allan
 

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Interesting. I was told this years ago (about lining up the barrel's and bell's "cartuche" with the tone holes - something about the wood's grain and where the manufacturer thought they were best sited). I didn't know if it was true or not and I never really experimented with it. But it was easy enough to do and so I do it to this day - even with an after-market Buffet barrel I use on my RC Prestige. If for no other reason than the "look".

The real reason for this thread seems to be too old to address. DAVE
 

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I have experimented with bell and barrel position. No difference in tone or intonation, from what I could discern. Of course, there is the placebo effect, so maybe a player will feel like they are playing better. That is worth something.
 
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