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Discussion Starter #1
Recently, While I was practicing my sax, I was getting ready to put my Bundy II alto sax in it's case. This happened when I was trying to remove the neck from the body of my sax, neck screw was tight, couldn't unscrew it. As I was trying to remove the neck from the body, the body got slightly bent. Good thing that there isn't any leaks on my horn.

The horn has no leaks. Im not attempting to fix it, but I have a question:
My bundy II alto has a soldered-on bow to bore, is there any way a technician can fix and straighten the bent body?

Is the body permanently bent?
 

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I take good care of this horn.
There may be some with a different opinion.

NEVER force anything on your horn. If something is stuck, more force is NOT the answer.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was trying to normally remove the neck, then I was unaware that the receiver screw was not loose. So I bent it, it wasn't my intention.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That is true, It would've been much worse if the body of the horn was bent enough to do damage to the tone holes, which would lead to a horrible leak between the key and the tone hole. The tone hole would be damaged.

The keys of my horn are always in place. They make a perfect seal, even though the body of my horn is slightly a tad bent. In the meantime, I will ignore it until I go to a saxophone repair shop to have it looked at. My sax repair bill might be high, because I am planning to change 13 soon-to-be worn pads on my saxophone, plus removal of small dents and body straightening.

Does this sound like a high repair bill for my horn?
 

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without knowing, I bent the saxophone's body by accident,
It would take a lot of deliberate force to bend a sax body by hand.... are you accidentally superman?

Actually it just occurred to me that if you were lifting your neck from the back by where the mpc. goes you very easily could have the torque to bend the body. Still though... I would think one would "feel" the point at which to realize something is terribly wrong before bending the body.

Always lift your neck from just above the reciever in the future... and loosen the darn screw!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It would take a lot of deliberate force to bend a sax body by hand.... are you accidentally superman?

Actually it just occurred to me that if you were lifting your neck from the back by where the mpc. goes you very easily could have the torque to bend the body. Still though... I would think one would "feel" the point at which to realize something is terribly wrong before bending the body.

Always lift your neck from just above the reciever in the future... and loosen the darn screw!
No, I was lifting the neck of my horn by the middle of the neck, with my hand, I did not grab on to the mouthpiece or anything. If I grabbed on to the mouthpiece, and pulled the neck, It would be stupid.
 

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No, I was lifting the neck of my horn by the middle of the neck, with my hand, I did not grab on to the mouthpiece or anything. If I grabbed on to the mouthpiece, and pulled the neck, It would be stupid.
Therein lies the problem. This is still incorrect... view my 18 second diagram:
saxband.JPG

By lifting at the middle of the neck you are still generating a moment that is capable of bending the sax. You should always lift the neck as depicted on the right... pulling it straight out. Even with the screw tightened you would not have bent the body by pulling it correctly in line with the body... and generating no moment.
 

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Even with that scenario, it would take some incredible ****ing to bend the body tube!

Less moment >> more ****.
 

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Haha... ****ing!

The whole scenario baffles me.

I imagine the millions of times that saxophones and their necks have been parted and reunited and I have never heard of this kind of damage resulting from that very regular part of sax playing.
 

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Maybe the body was always bent but only these days it was discovered to be so.

If it behaves now as it always has, don't worry. You may want to ask your repair person about it next time you bring the instrument for a service.
 

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T...Does this sound like a high repair bill for my horn?

Maybe… then maybe not…

True story: A few years back my Bundy sax had a serious accident; As a result of going airborne for a few seconds and then crashed keys side down onto the floor, the body was bent in places where some tone holes got pushed inward and many rods were bent too. Everyone that witnessed this accident including myself, thought that nothing could be done to save the sax, but for sentimental reasons I took it to my repairman anyway.

I expected him to tell me to forget it, that nothing could be done or that it would end up costing way too much for what the sax is worth. To my surprise however, the repairman told me to come back in a couple of days – So I did – He did fix the sax, in fact it even played better than before and the repairs cost less than 100$.

Baffled, I looked at the repairman who said that it wouldn’t have been possible if the sax wasn’t a Bundy.

My advice:
  1. You should not attempt to fix bent body, bent rods or bent whatever by yourself. A repairman has all the right tools to do the job.
  2. Take your horn to the repairman in order to get an estimate of how much it is going to cost you to get the job done.
  3. Decide whether it is worth it or not to get the job done -- i.e.: it might be easier to simply get another sax.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Danny, Yes, That is how it happened. You got got an idea of how it occurred.

It was not of my intention. I did not know that lifting it from the middle would bend the body.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I think it might be worth it because the majority of my horn's tone holes are functioning properly. All of it's keys are functioning as they should. My sax is playable.

I don't do intentional damage to the horn, as I said, my horn is well taken care of.
 

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Maybe… then maybe not…

True story:

Baffled, I looked at the repairman who said that it wouldn’t have been possible if the sax wasn’t a Bundy.

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Bundy's get a bad rap, but in college a buddy of mine's fell from the bleachers onto cement. Thing looked absolutely bent. He was able to adjust by hand to play for the rest of the game. He got his fixed too.
 

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I think it might be worth it because the majority of my horn's tone holes are functioning properly
You know, in the best of scenarios they should all be functioning properly :bluewink:

Seriously, go see a tech to have him look and give you an estimate (That is, if you want to know)
 
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