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Is there anything I can do to minimize on the stuffyness?....I am still trying to find a mouthpiece that works well with it, I have an STM 7*, don't like it, a selmer "D" don't like it, Selmer S190, don't like it, does anyone think any of these mouthpieces have anything to do with the stuffyness?
 

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Sounds like an issue of either a leak or key height. Not mouthpiece, especially as you have tried a couple. The 400 is a good horn. Properly setup it should not have serious issues of stuffiness. Check leaks, then check to see if the heights are too low.
 

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My TH&C has a really stuffy D2, but it sounds clear if I open the C# key while playing D2, which is a bit awkward at times. I plan to take it to a tech very soon, but am not sure what they'll be able to do, as the key heights (including C#) are already very high.

Maybe they could lower the other key heights, and leave C# where it is? But that would of course affect the tuning. Maybe there's another fix? I realize this is a problem common to many horns.
 

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Some quick things you can try:
1. try a wrap of teflon tape around the neck to make sure there is not a leak in the tenon area.
2. try a slightly softer reed (as long as it doesn't compromise the upper register pitch).
3. Take more mouthpiece in your mouth, and let the entire free length of the reed vibrate.
 

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2. try a slightly softer reed (as long as it doesn't compromise the upper register pitch).
That seemed to work, mijderf, thanks! And this new reed improves my tone overall, so it's win-win. Now I just need to shave my other reeds down to size.

14 year old thread...

How do you even find these :blackeye:
Dunno--too much spare time maybe? :mrgreen: I usually find that if you can think of a sax-related topic, SOTW has already covered it somewhere. Besides, what's 14 years to a 60-year-old horn?
 

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My TH&C has a really stuffy D2there's another fix?

I realize this is a problem common to many horns.
Old thread, I realize, and the OP is probably long gone, but since the topic is up again... I didn't realize this was a problem to many horns at all. I've never encountered it. Certainly not on either of my Buescher Aristocrat tenors or the MKVI.

Unless you mean the particular timbre of D2? I don't find it stuffy at all, but it does have its own sound, like many notes on the horn.

And yeah, the one characteristic of a reed that is too hard is the sound gets stuffy, but in that case it isn't just limited to D2.
 

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Two things that have yet to be mentioned are increasing the opening of the low C key which is a trade off since it may make the D even more sharp. The other is substituting the D palm key for the octave key. In many cases this improves not only the pitch of the D but the timbre as well.
 

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The other is substituting the D palm key for the octave key. In many cases this improves not only the pitch of the D but the timbre as well.
That may well be worth trying, however, and this is of course subjective, I find the timbre of the octave key fingering (the standard fingering) for D2, to be better--deeper & richer, than using the palm key. I like the palm key for certain quick passages or a fast C#-D-C# triplet just fine. But for a D2 held for any length of time, I prefer the sound using the standard fingering. Then again, if that one is truly stuffy, the palm D might be preferable. Or even better, get the horn checked out.
 

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Thanks for the tips! Dropping from a Rigotti Gold 2.5 Medium to 2.5 Light made all the difference. D2 was the only really stuffy note, but my tone has improved across the range, at least on this specific reed. I tried a few other Lights from the same box, and they were lousy. The Mediums seem more consistent. Plus the Light reeds close up on me if I'm not careful, and may not provide the volume I need when playing with my bands.

Using the D palm key works too (I tried it this afternoon), but isn't noticeably better to my ear, and the octave key feels more natural to me.

And yeah, I definitely plan to have the horn checked out and repadded soon. Meanwhile, it plays very well, though I'm sure my new tech can make this B12 play much better still.
 

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I didn't realize this was a problem to many horns at all.
I didn't either, but searching for a solution turned up a bunch of links about stuffy D2s on Keilwerths, Yanis, S20s, etc.--and not only tenors:

Stuffy, dead sounding D2 on my new Keilworth tenor. [Archive] - Sax ...

middle D and Eb stuffy [Archive] - Sax on the Web Forum

"stuffy" D on Yanagisawa sop [Archive] - Sax on the Web Forum

D in both Octaves sounds "muffled" on Yani Alto [Archive] - Sax on ...

Argh! I hate middle D on every horn.... [Archive] - Sax on the Web ...

How come the D note sounds the MOST muffled? [Archive] - Sax on ...

There are also several links about sharp D2's. Maybe D2 is more of a compromise on certain horns?
 

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I didn't either, but searching for a solution turned up a bunch of links about stuffy D2s on Keilwerths, Yanis, S20s, etc.--and not only tenors.

There are also several links about sharp D2's. Maybe D2 is more of a compromise on certain horns?
Yes, I think it's a matter of interpretation of the term 'stuffy.' I'll admit that D2 on the sax has a bit deeper timbre than most other notes; as opposed to say, C2, which has a more open sound. Which argues that maybe it has something to do with the difference made by closing a lot of the tone holes when playing D2. But to my ear it's not really 'stuffy' or muffled, just different. Maybe you have to put more air into the horn on that note.

Intonation is another matter and yes, D2 and E2 (especially) tend to play a bit sharp; it's just a matter of being aware of that tendency and 'lipping' or 'voicing' the note down to bring it in tune.

Both these issues are not limited to Buescher; as you point out, they occur with most, maybe all, brands of sax. All I'm saying is I don't see it as a problem, just part of playing the sax.
 

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That makes good sense, JL. In this case, the timbre of the D2 really was from a different palate altogether--and not a pleasant one, though it was likely just the reed and my own air support or whatever. For the record, my B12 has a very clear and consistent tone across the registers, which is why D2 stood out so much.
 
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