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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I just wanted to say that I have been noticing that my alto sax has some muffled notes.

My alto sax is a bundy II.

The muffled notes are- Left and Right hand D with octave key, octave F sharp, right hand pinky C with octave key. I tried opening my throat. It was a terrible idea.:tsk::tsk::tsk:

What is wrong with my Bundy II Sax??????:tsk::tsk::tsk:
I cannot get the octave d, RH pinky C and octave F sharp to speak clearly.
Plus, I noticed that my Bundy II has 3 riveted pads, the F sharp pad is riveted and the C sharp pad is riveted. All my other pads on the bundy II have plastic resonators.

Should I take it to my local repair shop to get these riveted pads replaced???

I'd rather have my sax with all plastic
resonators.

Is it the riveted pads?

Do pads w/ a rivet causes a muffled sound?
Should I get it padded w/ plastic resonators?

P.S- Sorry for the long post.

My sax doesn't have leaks.

How can I get rid of this????????:|
 

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Check it for leaks. My midle D,E and F were muffled, and after I fixed a leak in the F palm pad, the sax was completely transformed.
 

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Sounds like the adjustment screw on the g# might be off. You should have someone check it out.

Also.....why play C that way?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Check it for leaks. My midle D,E and F were muffled, and after I fixed a leak in the F palm pad, the sax was completely transformed.
I do check it for leaks. All pads seal properly. Is it because of the riveted F sharp and C sharp saxophone pads?
 

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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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I mean all fingers down as shown with the low D fingering but with the right hand low C pinky key..
I've never played anything where fingering low C to get its octave was easier than any of the other four options I know of (middle finger left hand, B + side C, B +Bis + Side C, or A + side C)...Then again, I don't have a leak light to check for sealing pads either...You are using one, right? Just because they might make a snappy sound doesn't mean there are no leaks.

I played an old Martin one time that had some pads with plastic resonators, some with metal and some with just a rivet...Didn't notice anything off. Wasn't my horn though.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've never played anything where fingering low C to get its octave was easier than any of the other four options I know of (middle finger left hand, B + side C, B +Bis + Side C, or A + side C)...Then again, I don't have a leak light to check for sealing pads either...You are using one, right? Just because they might make a snappy sound doesn't mean there are no leaks.

I played an old Martin one time that had some pads with plastic resonators, some with metal and some with just a rivet...Didn't notice anything off. Wasn't my horn though.
I check the pads if they seal properly. They all do. I think that there may be a small very minor leak on the low C pad but it does not affect my sax. My sax can play from palm F down to low B flat easily. It can play the entire range. I use a small high powered flashlight as a leaklight.
 

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I check the pads if they seal properly. They all do. I think that there may be a small very minor leak on the low C pad but it does not affect my sax. My sax can play from palm F down to low B flat easily. It can play the entire range. I use a small high powered flashlight as a leaklight.
You really need a string of lights to be able to accurately check as far as I know. Maybe you need to go to a tech...taking out a couple leaks is a pretty quick fix.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
@Dave Dolson: My D and low c with octave seems to sound a bit better.

What can I do to completely change the way these notes sound?- To make it sound more clearer.

Is it the riveted pads I have to replace?
I adjusted the G sharp screw as someone mentioned that it may have been out of adjustment. Fixing the G sharp screw helped a bit.
it made my bis key pad seal a bit more. All pads seal perfectly.

Is it the key heights?

Maybe I need to keep it to a tech someday.
I take really good care of my sax.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sounds like the adjustment screw on the g# might be off. You should have someone check it out.

Also.....why play C that way?
Thanks for pointing that out, Eric, I adjusted that. The screw helped the D note play a bit clearer. Maybe I need to replace the riveted pad?
 

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You should take it to your repair shop and have the riveted pads checked for leaks.
I they are bad then have them replaced.
While it is in the shop have the pads with resonators checked for leaks.
Have the repaiman fix those too.
 

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No one seems to want to address the riveted pads (whatever those are) . . . I'm thinking NO. You said all the pads sealed.

I found it interesting that one application of the adjusting screw possibly made your horn better. That tells me that the inter-connected mechanisms may be at fault. So, even if you think your pads are sealing well, there are always times when the pads that are supposed to be totally closed (for instance G#, bis Bb, the upper octave vent when you press the octave key for notes below A, etc.)- aren't.

In addition to the one screw you've already worked on, you may want to sit down with your horn held out a bit and watch each intricate mechanism to see if something might be moving ever so slightly. When you go for D2 and above, look to see if the upper octave is moving - rising a slight bit. Look to see if the G# is rising at all as you finger the various stack keys, etc. The slightest movement will make D2 and those notes above it lose their punch. DAVE
 

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Let's make sure we are on the same page with the pad type. I think the Bundy IIs came with plastic resos so the riveted pads mus be replacements. It really doesn't make a lot of difference as long as the pads are covering. A flashlight will not show the leaks well. You need a bulb on a string or light strip. I make them by going to Radio Shack and getting a small bulb socket and bulb to fit. Take an old power converter from a dead phone, radio or whatever, cut the end plug off at the 12V end and attached your new bulb socket and bulb. Assuming you have enough wire, drop the light down the horn. Always check the palm keys, right hand side keys and low Eb as they are usually the first to show problems.
If all else fails, take it to a tech. I have a lot of horns with mismatched pads and it makes little difference. The main point is to have them seal well. One bad pad up in the top end of the horn will make every note below it bad and the lower you go the worse it will get. An easy way to tell if you have leaks is to play in the upper register and see if it is much better than the low end. The Bundy II is an OK horn and it sounds like you have some leak problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Let's make sure we are on the same page with the pad type. I think the Bundy IIs came with plastic resos so the riveted pads mus be replacements. It really doesn't make a lot of difference as long as the pads are covering. A flashlight will not show the leaks well. You need a bulb on a string or light strip. I make them by going to Radio Shack and getting a small bulb socket and bulb to fit. Take an old power converter from a dead phone, radio or whatever, cut the end plug off at the 12V end and attached your new bulb socket and bulb. Assuming you have enough wire, drop the light down the horn. Always check the palm keys, right hand side keys and low Eb as they are usually the first to show problems.
If all else fails, take it to a tech. I have a lot of horns with mismatched pads and it makes little difference. The main point is to have them seal well. One bad pad up in the top end of the horn will make every note below it bad and the lower you go the worse it will get. An easy way to tell if you have leaks is to play in the upper register and see if it is much better than the low end. The Bundy II is an OK horn and it sounds like you have some leak problems.

The low b flat speaks clearly and other notes speak clearly. How do these leaks occur if no keys are bent or anything?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I played upper register, notes comes out clear.

I hear no squeaks on my sax.

Probably has a leak that I'm not even aware of.
 
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