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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
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Discussion Starter #1
People are always talking about doing some kind of long tone work. I really hadn't done any on my alto in years but I was doing it on flute everyday for the last few weeks. On flute I was playing a b in the staff for 5 minutes just opening it up. It worked . two weeks into doing that my flute tone took a great jump. I thought why not do that for my sax?

I'm going to do a long tone exercise for 30 days and try to track if it gives me gains/progress in tone quality and control. I've recorded Day,1, 2, and 3 on You tube (look up practice with Kride or my name Keith Ridenhour. I don't use the same reeds everyday so that makes a dif and I changed the exercise today. Day 1, 2 I was holding a C sharp in the staff for 5 minutes.

I changed it today thanks to a great lesson I took yesterday. So now I take one breath every note full range of the horn rather than sit on the C# . It takes me about 7 minutes and I go down to low Bb and up to altissimo Bb. So lets see what happens. Day 3 out of 30. I really hope this does for my alto tone what I noticed for my flute tone. Be well every one. K
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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7,409 Posts
It should work - its almost impossible that it won't. Normally you hit the tone at MF, bring it up to F, bring it down to P and back up to MF, all without going sharp or flat. The use of a tuner is recommended. The great thing about long tones is you can add torturous variations like bending up and down to the next half-tone or adding vibrato but make it faster and slower along with the volume changes. When your embouchure cramps up, relax it for a few seconds then stretch it like you're yawning. Now you can do another ten minutes! For more concentrated exercise, do it on soprano.
 
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