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Discussion Starter #1
It jams nearly flawlessly from bottom to top. The body pip spring is a little weak and it sometimes stays stuck down, messing up D2 through G2, although of course I can hit them without the octave key it makes it easier when the mechanism works.

View attachment 30298 View attachment 30299 View attachment 30300 View attachment 30301

1. The bell engraving... different than my 1919

2-3. All three left to right 1919 Wonder, 1920 New Wonder, 1926 NW II "Chu"

4. The iconic nail file G#

Initial report:

For some reason it feels waaaay smoother than the Wonder or New Wonder, now shorthand to W. and N.W. The Chu seems to play in tune effortlessly without the usual embouchure adjustments that increase in pronouncement to the Wonder. It has a different quality to the tone also... not as ballsy as the 1919 W. or 20's soulful like the 1920 N.W., it is exceptionally dark in its nature, even with the high baffle Metalite. It is easier to subtone, and feels faster in its keywork. Palm keys vastly improved from flimsy ones, they stick out more. I have decided that I cannot sell it :)
 

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Sounds like you've found a horn that suits you well. Very interesting to compare the three. Thankyou.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
There is also some grime all over the horn...as you can see in the first pic of the bell engraving there is a sort of rust streak coming down from the engraving... best way to clean it since it is laquered?

Would it be worthwhile to take the keys off and have the body sonic cleaned? It is not exceptionally dirty, so that may be over the top a little bit... but I am not sure how I would clean it as I only have experience with silverplate...
 

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Meguiar's Cleaner/Polish works great. Get it at your local car parts store - you can use it on your car and guitars as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
^ cars and guitars... all plurals here :) Awesome thanks Dr. G!
 

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Be aware however that this product is not recommended for use on Riva motor launches or the coachwork of the 1925 8 cylinder 7.4 litre "Typo Spinto" Isotta-Fraschini. [rolleyes]
 

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Be aware however that this product is not recommended for use on Riva motor launches or the coachwork of the 1925 8 cylinder 7.4 litre "Typo Spinto" Isotta-Fraschini. [rolleyes]
Oh bugger - guess I'll just have to keep looking... :(
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Been looking at the thread about removing silver tarnish... a little scary I leave my silverplate horns out on the stand (I bought an actual sax stand yay!) so I can just pick them up and play whenever. Usually one is in its case and the other is out. Luckily Colorado is very dry climate, and I also purchased a silk swab that I use after playing. So far my 1919 that is still all hand polished is still immaculate, I haven't seen any signs of fast tarnishing under the keys.

Why is this in this thread? I now have a lacquered C-Mel that stays out on the stand, so my silver plates can be in their cases more. Someone was trying very hard to convince me that my "Chu" is actually gold plate though, but it looks to dark to be gold. Add to that the fact that I can see Conn's original factory solder peeking out under some posts and reinforcements and I believe that my horn was indeed silver or gold (probably silver) and it was stripped and lacquered. The lacquer looks very old and dark to me, so my guess is that it happened sometime in the 30's or 40's.

Any thoughts? It doesn't look like gold plate to you guys does it?
 

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+1 for 'not gold plate', there were a lot more subtleties to the gold-plated 20's saxes, e.g. more (and more intricate) engraving, plus combinations of matt/bright/burnished finishes. And (afaik), didn't they need to be silver plated before the gold plate, as gold doesn't easily go straight onto brass ?

I got really excited about a Buescher C I had once, where the lacquer looked more gold than real gold... Sadly not 24 carat plating, the (lack of) extra engraving clinched it !
 

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You tell us that you leave your "silver plate horns on the stand". How many silver plate horns do you own please?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ahhh yes. A very eccentric student I showed it to is hellbent on convincing me that it is gold plate. She even suggested scratching the bottom of a key to see if there is silver underneath. Now I understand why no one in the program takes her seriously... I won't be scratching any part of my Chu.

Now there are two things on this Chu that raise slight concern. The first is that the strap ring hook is severely worn. It has a notch from steel strap hooks about half-way through, I got a good pic of it but can't post it till later.

Second thing I have noticed while playing in A is that I usually like to hold the G# down when I go into the lower stack a bit. The little ear off of the F tonehole has good cork on it, but it looks like its bent up a little bit. So when I am trying to play F#, E, D... there is a weakness in the tone/gurgling/squealing. I have noticed that if I finger F# or E or D, and trill the G# key (Not the G# trill key haha) that it wiggles up and down. So I have 2 options, bend the ear down a little bit... or put even thicker cork under it so that the lower stack keys properly close the G#.

Other than that, there are a few minor dents on the instrument, one on the side of the bow, one on the B pad cup?, and one up on the side of the microtuner neck. Also, it looks like the tip of the microtuner neck was squished a tiny bit, its out of round. The cork has been sanded to accommodate the deformity underneath though, so the mpc. still seals well. Unlike my other Conns, which need some paper or plumbers tape, its neck has been corked for Bb tenor mouthpieces. It still plays more consistently than either of my other Conns though... and wonderfully too!

At any rate, I am very excited to have the Conn lineup from Wonder --> Chu, they are all equally fun to play. Among the other school music-heads, I have now been dubbed the Connman C...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You tell us that you leave your "silver plate horns on the stand". How many silver plate horns do you own please?
2, my 1919 Wonder and my 1920 New Wonder. They are swabbed and in their cases now, the lacquered 1926 Chu is out on the stand as my ready-to-play horn now.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Another question on my laquered chu... although I can clean the outside and keywork nicely with meguiars polish as suggested, what can be done about the inside?

I have heard talk of a toothbrush on a stick and some white vinegar? Would this be a proper procedure to scrub out the body tube a little bit? (Keys off of course)
 

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Another question on my laquered chu... although I can clean the outside and keywork nicely with meguiars polish as suggested, what can be done about the inside?

I have heard talk of a toothbrush on a stick and some white vinegar? Would this be a proper procedure to scrub out the body tube a little bit? (Keys off of course)
Who's gonna look in there? Besides - People charge extra for that. That stuff is what makes your playing funky. You gotta have the funk to play the funk. :)
 

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How did you clean the other two ?
 

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View attachment 30345

If you don't trust your original eyelet you can add some. Here's how my 1925 "Chu" looks with the extra eyelets installed. I believe I got the balance perfect. The eyelets came from Music Medic and cost me $25 to have installed.
 

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Regarding the articulated G# leak. That cork on the tang tends to get compressed and I prefer to leave it there and glue a small piece of paper on the cork to compensate. Try some different pieces ranging from newsprint to card stock and when you find the one that works best, cut a small piece and glue it in.d
Use a leak light as if you put too much paper, everything from F# down will leak.
 

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Regarding the articulated G# leak. That cork on the tang tends to get compressed and I prefer to leave it there and glue a small piece of paper on the cork to compensate. Try some different pieces ranging from newsprint to card stock and when you find the one that works best, cut a small piece and glue it in.d
Use a leak light as if you put too much paper, everything from F# down will leak.
You can also get tech-cork in very thin sheets that could be glued onto the existing, if you need something closer to the card stock end of the thickness range.
 
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