Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Thought this talk was done quite well. Hope you enjoy.

 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
38,799 Posts
Interesting, we’ve had other threads on this and there are many people who have equated music to language, not so much because of philosophic reasons but because the areas of brain which superintend to creating languages (and the neural-structures associated) may be the sae ones which superintend to music.

I like the idea of stressing the role of intuition in learning and playing (he makes one of my favorite points: A singer doesn’t have to ask “ What key are we in?” and mostly doesn’t know even when he or she is told , what that means)

Of course, there are different opinions

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...-hate-the-quot-Language-quot-analogy-to-music!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,703 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
Victor emphasizes what I think is a very important point when he says that the music is already within you. The process of learning can destroy that or enhance. Unfortunately the way many teachers approach the way sax is taught is a prescriptive method that de-emphasizes the freedom of expression and tries to replace it with a single archaic style. Practice is always necessary for anyone to become proficient at anything, yet forcing anyone in the arts to conform to a single way of expressing their creativity is a destructive process. The devil is in the details. How do we teach the instrument, and not be teaching a singe style of playing? The jazz musicians of the mid 20th century found a way that was partially an economic push point of big bands not being viable. They also elevated the idea of improvisation to the core of what they played. It was new then, it's old now. Music has faced other more challenging issues since, and yet the teaching has petrified into a position where students often become technicians of an instrument rather than artists.

There is an enormous amount of wisdom in what Victor has said and he lives this in his playing and teaching role. I sincerely hope that sax teachers can open their minds to give students the tools they need rather than dictating a singe way of playing. The challenge of how to become a unique voice has never been more important. We can't keep flogging the same methods and just telling students that the best they can do is to try and sound like some player from 60 years ago. This is today and the world doesn't need tens of thousands of wannabe imitators playing standards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
I would like to add to what whamptoncourt said, since I too really like the (very rich) message of Victor Wooten : I don't know about considering music as a language, but if I understand correctly that's not what this video is about. It is more about teaching/learning music as we teach/learn our mother tongue. You don't start with lessons decomposing the language into alphabet, vocabulary, grammar, etc. You just live completely surrounded by it, whether you focus and listen or not, and are usually more than welcome to participate, should you choose to. Even if at first you don't even have to.

In the case of music, and except if you're a singer, it has to go through an instrument. Fine. That may make indeed the process slightly different from speaking/singing, and _I_ surely find it extra difficult to deal with that 'external tool' that is the instrument. On the other hand I am not a kid anymore... I would really liked to find a teacher that would apply these ideas when I first tried to learn music as a kid. However I have been fortunate enough to have music in my life for as long as I can recall, and I can see quite often how it helps me today while playing... (or trying to)

Funny enough a friend of mine and I discussed a related issue, where he was comparing himself - experimented, with conservatory diploma, knowing quite well music theory, practiced to many styles of music, etc - and another guy less technically skilled than him but who grew up in a musician home where listening to and playing music was just part the daily activities. His point was that the other guy would always give solos and performances more creative and overall more 'alive'. I listened to both many times, and that is my opinion too.

I know the conclusion about how they learned music is not that straightforward, but one still has to wonder...
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top