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Does anyone have like a fingering chart for multiphonics or can someone tell me some fingerings for them?
 

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i find that there are many different variations depending on the sax you have, how you blow etc. experiment.
 

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democratruler said:
Does anyone have like a fingering chart for multiphonics or can someone tell me some fingerings for them?
There's an older Saxophone Journal with a David Pope piece (with cd) on this: it works pretty well for tenor. He makes some useful distinctions about different kinds of multiphonics and how the tone production works.
 

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Multiphonics for Saxophone by John Gross is available from Advance Music.
Tons of stuff in there. Or Hello Mr. Sax! by Londeix.
 

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I would recommend John Gross' book on multiphonics as well, I've been working out of that book, and although the fingerings in the book don't always produce the same tones as is written in the book, it does have a ton of information to take in
 

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I've read many books, articles, etc on multiphonics and have to say that far and away the most comprehensive multiphonics book is by Daniel Kientzy. http://www.kientzy.org.

More possibilities, more fingerings, explanation, notation, everything.

Available from Kientzy or you can get it from Vandoren or Dorn Publications I believe.

Angel
 

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I love reading books, but not always sax books. You can just experiment with fingerings yourself. This forum has lots of info for free. The only problem I had was when I went to a new saxophone, it was all different. Have fun and make sure your family is wearing earplugs!
 

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The Kientzy book appears to be hard to find. I have the Gross; it's helpful. Dorn Publications lists a multiphonics book by Ken Dorn; I haven't seen it so can't recommend it, but it's out there. Also the David Pope feature in Saxophone Journal I mentioned above. Check this link: http://www.dornpub.com/multiphonics.html
 

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For a sample fingering, see what you get when you finger low C but leave off your F (right index) finger raised.
 

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Angel said:
I've read many books, articles, etc on multiphonics and have to say that far and away the most comprehensive multiphonics book is by Daniel Kientzy. http://www.kientzy.org.

More possibilities, more fingerings, explanation, notation, everything.

Available from Kientzy or you can get it from Vandoren or Dorn Publications I believe.

Angel
I second that recommendation. Be sure to search for Les Sons Multiples aux Saxophones, published by Salabert. Here's a place one search turned up, as I ordered mine years ago. Give Eble Music a try as well. Their web site is sporadically down, but try E-mail: [email protected] or Telephone: 319-338-0313 Fingerings are very specific to each saxophone, and provide specific dynamics that they are effective at, etc. Highly comprehensive, and certainly the standard resource for classical/concert saxophonists. Many pieces will provide a reference in the score to K.121, etc., which refers to Kientzy fingering #121.
 

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In the late 60's I got a fingering chart by Don Sinta, that contained fingering, jaw position, etc- when I studied at Interlochen. I wonder if anyone still has this chart?
 

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I didn't know there was so much out there on this. I'm +1 vote on experimenting w/ random fingerings by investigating all the frequencies available, how strong each is in the mix etc... The key technique is "averaging" your embouchure to produce multiple pitches. This kind of practicing tends to be unpopular with anyone nearby and also to shred reeds. A little goes a long way.
 
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