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Question 1: So I can hit Altissimo G, G#, A, A# and C and I can get multiphonics in the G and the A. How would I get the nice raspy multiphonic sound on the others? Altissimo without it sounds bad, but as soon as the multiphonic sound comes in on the G and A it sounds just like Sanborn. For the G and A, at first it sounds like altissimo w/o multiphonics, but holding the note with enough air causes the multiphonics to creep up and then enters the note. In other words, it sounds bad, then you can hear a low raspyness, then BOOM its there. Is that normal?

Question 2: How does one instantly initiate or use multiphonics? When I listen to the professionals (I.E Sanborn who's famous for it) seem to be able to switch between Altissimo with multiphonics to Altissimo without it in a heartbeat. is it different fingerings or just oral cavity position?
 

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Multiphonics is the playing of more than one note at a time, what you're probably talking about is usually known as split tones.

Good altissimo is all about control, so if you can only hit a couple of notes, you've still got a way to go :) What happens is mostly controlled by what you're doing with your throat and airstream, so try experimenting with changing the shape of your throat (think: move your adam's apple around) and how you're pushing air through (e.g. free-flowing vs. constricted, hot air vs. cold air).

For me, split tones just started coming by themself once I'd gotten fairly proficient at the basics of altissimo. It just takes time for your body to learn what it needs to do. Fingerings help a *little* (e.g. I have two different fingerings I typically use for G but I can get a split tone on both, slightly different in sound) but it's primarily about what you're doing with your throat, airstream and to a lesser extent, embouchure. The fact that you can slowly get to a split tone indicates this - you use a certain fingering and blow, then your body changes what it's doing ever so slightly (maybe without you even realising it) until the split tone comes. Over time, you'll be able to hit the note with or without the split tone, straight away.
 

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So just over time it'll start occuring under control?
Well, you still have to practice and work at it [rolleyes]

I'm not 100% sure of the physics behind split tones but I think of it as playing several dissonant harmonics at the same time (so strictly speaking, it is a kind of multiphonic technique :)) and this requires really precise control over what your body is doing. If you can only hit a few altissimo notes every now and then, that's not nearly enough. My personal experience was as I got really fluent playing in the altissimo range, I think my body learned the precise control needed to eke out the different notes and was then able to make the fine adjustments needed to get the split tones.

But it's impossible to explain what I'm doing - can you explain to someone what your lungs and throat and tongue are doing when you talk? All I can suggest is to keep working on improving your "normal" altissimo playing, experiment as much as possible, and the split tones will come.
 
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