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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone! I have this issue with my horn and I've looked on several other forums for fixes but haven't taken action on any yet. I wanted to get some solid advice before I start playing operation.

It's an Alto sax, Buescher True Tone (based on what I've been told and researched) 248xxx
I've owned it for about 4 years now, although I haven't played it for two of those years. Jumping back into school, I noticed that my high A on the horn sounded very muffled and almost suppressed. The subsequent notes above were insanely sharp as well. At first, I thought I had somehow clogged the horn or something. My professor suggested it could be embouchure issues, seeing as I haven't played for a few years. About a week ago, I talked about it once again with my professor and he tried it out with the same result- Muffled A and sharp upper register after that. He did a quick check on the pads and octave key and everything appears to check out

The only idea I've got so far is it has something to do with the octave key hole. Some people have mentioned similar problems with their horns and have given various fixes with the hole... But I don't want to jump to any conclusions. Any advice on what to do?
Thanks in advance!
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Something has changed and it isn't the vent hole diameters. Do you have a neck stuffer or swab that you can pull thru? How about the same thing for the body? Take a pipe cleaner and run it through the octave vent holes in neck and body. Make sure the octave keys are opening and closing properly; neck octave closed on G2, open on A2 and above - body octave open on G2, closed on A2 and above. I suspect the body octave is not closing on A2 and above.
 

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Yes, if I had to take a shot in the dark I'd say the same thing: if horn is in tune D2-G#2, then goes wonky A2 and above....something is up with the octave mech.

When you release the G touch while pressing octave key, the body pip should close completely and the neck octave pip should engage. Sometimes both pips will be open, though, and that will mess up the intonation up there.

If you can, locate the body octave key/pip...and play G2-A2 back and forth, while looking in mirror to see if the body pip is not closing when you lift your finger off of the G touch while depressing the octave key...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'll be sure to do that! If I remember, the upper register has always sounded like this, but it'd been so long that I don't remember looking into fixes from a few years back
 

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Take it to a reputable tech.
 

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For diagnosis, et somebody to squeeze the body octave vent closed while you play.
Other than that, +1 to badmommy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the suggestions y’all! I’ve tried the various fixes described with no luck so far, as well as taking it to a local shop. They fixed it up with a couple new pads and tightening screws but no luck still. I know it’s hard to suggest anything without the physical instrument, but does anyone have any other ideas?
 

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Ths sounds like normal True Tone stuff to me. It's especially true with a vintage (large chamber) mp and harder reed. I suspect the fix would be a bit of work on the octave mechanism (the pip) and some thoughtful work on the neck for intonation.
 

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