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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I have an unlacquered/ bare brass vintage Buescher saxophone and the tech that serviced my sax recommended me to use Mr Sheen to clean/ maintain the sax (First spray it on a cloth), as this will give the saxophone a silicon layer to protect it against dust etc...

Does anyone know if this is a good idea, or will it damage alter the finnish in some sort way?

Regards!
 

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well, the more you rub a metal the more you wear it out, at least, in theory, in reality, if you don't use anything as aggressive as brasso , you will never take much metal by simply, occasionally polishing a horn. An unlacquered horn has no protection from the elements whatsoever and if you let it oxidise it will turn dark and dull and perhaps, depending on many things, getting a green hue which is not too bad either. Wax, silicone or anything else makes it slippery (so be careful) but it does , somehow, protect it from excessive oxidisation , once it gets to the color that you like, start protecting it. If you rub it " clean" it will not get dark and dull which is the effect that most people seek on a unlacquered horn.
 

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Hmmm... Mr. Sheen has seen better days... :tsk:

Regarding bare brass mainteinance, I like 3M premium liquid car wax (carnauba) leaves a nice deep gold tone and it doesn't remove material. It just takes care of greasy gunky stuff that clings onto the bare brass surface. Use sparingly, once a month or so. At first it looks like the horn's clearer than before and in abotu 6 hours it kind of goes back to normal deep patina color.
 

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I have had some great results on all sorts of metals with turtle wax car cleaner, very very fine and smell nice too!
 

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I've heard the tiger's blood in Mr. Sheen can cause your horn to melt.
It's not likely. There was a big flap several years ago when it was discovered that Mr. Sheen actually only contained a trace amount of pig blood and no feline blood was found. Even though they claim to still use the original formula, the company secretly gave in to the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora Act (T.I.A.S. 8249). An article in the November 2008 edition of Popular Mechanist magazine indicates that Mr. Sheen still works well on most metal surface. The only decrease in performance, without the lauded tiger blood, was on rhodium and tungsten surfaces. The magazine did several trials on rhodium and tungsten surfaces using a modified mixture of Mr. Sheen and a small amount of blood from domesticated cats (Felis catus). The results were promising but it was concluded that much of targeted customer base in western nations would be offended by the use of products from the slaughter of domesticated cats. So it was determined that the current "tiger free" formula of Mr. Sheen was most likely best for the product at this time.
 

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I think Mr. Sheen uses a lot of coke...but not to clean his filthy mouthpiece. I'm still waiting for the fire breathing fists metronome.
 

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I think my unenlightened, un-evolved horn isn't capable of comprehending what Mr. Sheen can do for it.
 

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not to mention the sticky residue Mr Sheen may leave on your horn. On the formula, I think it has Lore's blood. That's according to Mr. Sheen, obviously.
 

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Mr. Sheen just released a new formula he's calling "WINNING", by Mr. Sheen. It not only allows you to win once, but also allows "bi-winning" capabilities. This can cut your buffing (winning) time by half, if not more.
 
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