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Those rubber pads people stick on the mpc (to contact the upper teeth): what are they good for? Do they affect the sound at all?
 

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they're used so that when you play you don't feel the vibrations on your teeth, I myself have some and love them they make playing alot easier

- Birdman
 

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My teeth are uneven, so it makes it easier to get a good grip on the mouthpiece. Ralph Morgan hates these, BTW.
 

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they also help to keep the mouthpiece from being damaged by the teeth
 

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Martin Williams said:
they also help to keep the mouthpiece from being damaged by the teeth
It took me 25 years to get toothmarks on mine.
I used pads for a while, some folks need them some don't. It doesn't hurt to try them.
 

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hakukani said:
It took me 25 years to get toothmarks on mine.
I used pads for a while, some folks need them some don't. It doesn't hurt to try them.

Dude, glad you finally got your dentures! 25 years is just toooooo long to gum your food!:D
 

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In my own playing I do believe the patch has a noticeable effect on the sound. By dampening the vibration of the top of the mouthpiece and by opening the teeth I believe that the patch gives me a somewhat darker or warmer sound than I get with the patch off---especially in classical playing.:!:

There are also many players who would disagree with me that the patch makes any difference in the sound at all. They say that the difference in the sound is all in the player's head. My response to this is "well, duh, isn't that where the sound is heard in the first place". :)

The best thing to do would be to try the patches for yourself and make your own decision about how they feel and sound to you.

John
 

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I think the thicker ones do dampen the sound a bit and make it harder to project. I use the thinner, clear ones just to prevent tooth damage.
 

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I use the thin clear ones to avoid leaving tooth marks on my mouthpiece; my teeth are sharp, I guess. I don't think that there's a noticeable difference to the listener when using thick, thin or no cushions at all. It feels different to the player though and that does matter.
My point is, I wouldn't buy the cushions expecting to sound better as a result........daryl
 

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They are good for gripping. I think any difference in tone is only assumed by the player since he/she may feel less vibration. I sincerely doubt there is any perceptable or measurable difference in reference to the sound comming from the horn...unless of course you think the color of the mpc makes a difference :)
 

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I actually prefer playing without one. As most have said, it's probably just in my mind but I think my tone improved when I took the pad off.
 

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I use the thin clear ones. I haven't noticed any difference in sound (although i haven't played without one for so long now its hard to remember). They help me grip the mouthpiece more. Sometimes my teeth slip around on the bite plate without them.
 

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I use them on my Jody Jazz mpc's.

These do not have the plastic bite plate, and are nicely gold
plated.

The pad helps grip on the hard metal and protects the finish.
I like the soft feel of the pads.

I chipped one of my upper front teeth a few years back, and so
there is an uneveness between my two uppers.

The pad helps compensate for that difference.
 
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