Sax on the Web Forum banner

21 - 40 of 48 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,263 Posts
For pieces that fit loosely, heat up the cork with a cig lighter. Or any other flame. Don't hold it in the same place very long or it will burn the cork. Heating it up evenly and briefly will expand the cork. It works great.

For pieces that fit loosely you can also wrap paper strips around the cork before you place the piece on the neck. That works fine too.

For pieces that don't fit on the cork because the MPC bore is too tight, yeah, you'll either have to shave odwn the cork or bore out the mouthpiece hole a little. Word to the wise - If you elect to shave down the cork at all, put some masking tape on your sax neck behind the cork so you don't scratch the lacquer of the sax neck when you sand the cork down.

Cheers,
Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
I just put two coats fingernail polish in the bore of a hard rubber mouthpiece that was fitting a bit too loose. After drying completely overnight, It seems to be working great so far. Just enough thickness to snug it up, and no sanding required. I’ll report back if any problems develop. I didn’t feel like using Teflon tape and such since most of the other mouthpieces I like fit the cork well.

...and I used a vivid red color, to give it that extra sizzle (sorry, couldn’t resist)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
Just a follow-up— the painting of fingernail polish inside the shank of a mouthpiece has worked out just fine. Seems to hold up well, the fit is fine and isn’t technique-sensitive. I used it on a very warm HR mouthpiece that I like to use occasionally, and don’t have to teflonn tape the neck cork or anything. I used a bright colored polish to make it easier to identify if one were ever trying to remove it.
 

·
Registered
SML RevD Tenor, SML RevD Alto
Joined
·
33 Posts
Glad to find this thread and notice that Im not alone. I got a metal link that feels really tight on the neck cork and I have been thinking if I should do something about it. As its just tight and I can get it off as I do use the corg grease, I will leave it be as it is. I was already bit intimitadet taking sand paper near that thing.

Just a note for anyone that might be reading the same thread, word of warning. I know from a experience (not on my sax) that cork and lighter, or flame of any kind do not match very well. So expanding the cork with a lighter is something I would not recommend... I'd rather start that experiment with a hairdryer.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,935 Posts
Glad to find this thread and notice that Im not alone. I got a metal link that feels really tight on the neck cork and I have been thinking if I should do something about it. As its just tight and I can get it off as I do use the corg grease, I will leave it be as it is. I was already bit intimitadet taking sand paper near that thing.

Just a note for anyone that might be reading the same thread, word of warning. I know from a experience (not on my sax) that cork and lighter, or flame of any kind do not match very well. So expanding the cork with a lighter is something I would not recommend... I'd rather start that experiment with a hairdryer.
Yes, using a lighter on a cork has inherent risk.

That aside, so does having a mouthpiece that is too tight on the cork. A properly sized cork alleviates the need to apply excessive force to the neck - a practice that leads to pull-down (bent neck).

It really is easy to adjust the cork. First apply tape to the neck adjacent to the cork so you don’t scratch the finish. Then use a strip of 150 sandpaper to trim the cork to size. It will cut slowly enough that you can pay attention to what you are doing and not cut it too small. Shape the cork to a cylinder (not a cone), so you can easily adjust the position of the mouthpiece in either direction and have it stay put.
 

·
Registered
SML RevD Tenor, SML RevD Alto
Joined
·
33 Posts
That might be a better solution for me, than to grind off the mouth piece., The thing is that the cork is rather OK with the hard rubber mpc. So, if I sand down the cork, I might risk it becoming too loose for the other mouthpieces?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,454 Posts
If you sand it down for the tightest one you may well have to wrap a strip of paper around it for the loosest one. There's no harm in that, most of us old farts have played many thousands of hours with a piece of paper on a worn down cork.

In my case where I have certain pieces I know I'm always going to be playing, I ream out the tighter ones to a constant dimension. Of course you can't return them to the store afterwards!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,703 Posts
That is just life in saxophone land. No standard measures for bores. Lots of different dyi remedies nd a few marketed solutions but you just have to work with it. The real oil in the ointment is Selmer, their bores are uber tiny. If you want to play a Selmer classical piece and change to a tone edge, you are miles apart in diameter. If you play links and you buy a new Selmer the first thing you have to do is recork the neck.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,935 Posts
That might be a better solution for me, than to grind off the mouth piece., The thing is that the cork is rather OK with the hard rubber mpc. So, if I sand down the cork, I might risk it becoming too loose for the other mouthpieces?
Pick one mouthpiece, and COMMIT. Problem solved.

Seriously. Try it for a month.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lostcircuits

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
Yes, using a lighter on a cork has inherent risk.
I just insert the neck cork into boiling water for this purpose. I find it works better than heating it with an open flame or a heat gun.

On occasion, when I've needed to switch between two mouthpieces that varied dramatically in bore diameter, I've also bored out mouthpieces (as turf3 suggested) or used the inverse trick of building up the bore (as claxton suggested). I believe that Mojo has a tutorial on YouTube on how to do this efficiently using epoxy.

EDIT: Here's that Mojo video
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,703 Posts
Food for conspiracy theorists: Mouthpiece makers hold stock in cork companies and buy futures in the teflon tape industry. Its bigger than you know.

In the internet age if you say it enough times, it becomes the truth.
 

·
Registered
SML RevD Tenor, SML RevD Alto
Joined
·
33 Posts
Food for conspiracy theorists: Mouthpiece makers hold stock in cork companies and buy futures in the teflon tape industry. Its bigger than you know.

In the internet age if you say it enough times, it becomes the truth.
Well if it is in the INTERNET, then it must be true... ;)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,935 Posts
I just insert the neck cork into boiling water for this purpose. I find it works better than heating it with an open flame or a heat gun.
Tea pots are great, too. Just position the cork in the jet of steam, and slowly rotate the neck.

Avoid steaming your hand - steam burns hurt!
 
  • Like
Reactions: lostcircuits

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,297 Posts
I just insert the neck cork into boiling water for this purpose. I find it works better than heating it with an open flame or a heat gun.

On occasion, when I've needed to switch between two mouthpieces that varied dramatically in bore diameter, I've also bored out mouthpieces (as turf3 suggested) or used the inverse trick of building up the bore (as claxton suggested). I believe that Mojo has a tutorial on YouTube on how to do this efficiently using epoxy.

EDIT: Here's that Mojo video
Ditto, ditto and ditto.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,297 Posts
Food for conspiracy theorists: Mouthpiece makers hold stock in cork companies and buy futures in the teflon tape industry. Its bigger than you know.

In the internet age if you say it enough times, it becomes the truth.
I thought it was the French who own most of the cork oaks in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine area :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,807 Posts
If you sand it down for the tightest one you may well have to wrap a strip of paper around it for the loosest one. There's no harm in that, most of us old farts have played many thousands of hours with a piece of paper on a worn down cork.
...
True, about the paper. I found that music paper works best, that thin 3-hole notebook paper sometimes needed two (or three!) layers.
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2012-2015
Joined
·
5,878 Posts
My solution to this problem is having several necks and using one mouthpiece in each, when they have significantly different bore diameters.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dr G
21 - 40 of 48 Posts
Top