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So I currently play alto and bari and I'm looking to upgrade my alto mouthpiece. The one I use right now is from a brand called Hermes. It came with the alto I got from a friend. It's an ok mouthpiece and it plays decently, but I'm looking for a better one that will really show off my skill. My price range is from about $50-$120. Any recommendations?
 

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The mouthpiece is not really going to 'show off your skill'. Only you as the player can do that.
For all purpose playing most high school kids use a good hard rubber piece. S80-C*, Vandoren AL3/4, Rousseau...
 

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Almost anything will be an improvement over the stock mouthpiece. If you play concert band a C* Selmer will be fine and for big band try a Meyer 6M. Either one will run you in the $50-60 range.
 

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Almost anything will be an improvement over the stock mouthpiece. If you play concert band a C* Selmer will be fine and for big band try a Meyer 6M. Either one will run you in the $50-60 range.
C* will run you 120$ new..? Maybe a you can find a used one for 50-60... a Meyer is 75$+ new?
 

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Try a Beechler Diamond for an inexpensive good mouthpiece. I have an S7S model .085 tip that works well with my horns

So I currently play alto and bari and I'm looking to upgrade my alto mouthpiece. The one I use right now is from a brand called Hermes. It came with the alto I got from a friend. It's an ok mouthpiece and it plays decently, but I'm looking for a better one that will really show off my skill. My price range is from about $50-$120. Any recommendations?
 

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That depends on whether you're looking for a concert mouthpiece or a jazz mouthpiece. For concert work, I really like the Vandoren Al3, though others might prefer the Selmer S80 C* or Rousseau NC4. The Rousseau's the cheapest. They're all pretty good, though Selmer has been known for consistency issues. For jazz type stuff, the Vandoren V16 is a good choice. Easy to control, consistent, and neutral enough to let you develop your sound over time.

All of these pieces can be found used for well under $100, and pop up quite often in the Marketplace. That would be the route I'd go. The Vandorens and the C* are around $120 new, and the Rousseau's around $75.
 

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The mouthpiece is not really going to 'show off your skill'. Only you as the player can do that.
So very true...

Everyone is different, and can have vastly different experiences with the same mouthpiece (that's partly why there are so many different makes and models). The question you've posted will probably result in a listing of the most popular brands of mouthpieces, along with a couple of quirky, off-the-wall models thrown in for variety.

If you think you're ready for a change, you're best bet is to hit a music shop and start trying some out. You'll know when you've found one that works for you.

For the record, I use a 'popular' Meyer 5M HR for alto (a late 70's Aristocrat) and a 'somewhat quirky' Rico Metalite M5 for bari (a Jupiter 593GL from around 2004) with 2.5 Fibracells on both - the setups give me a similar resistance that makes doubling easier, and synthetic means I don't have to worry about reeds drying out on stage. But that's just me, your results may vary.

My Meyer alto piece cost me US$200 about a year ago, but that's the price of living in Australia. They should be available for under $100 new in Texas, and probably less if you look online.
 

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The mouthpiece does show off your skill..
I've seen amazing players that sucked because of there equipment. An alto player in my concert band wasn't doing so hot... a little makeover with reeds and a new mouthpiece and he was awesome. If you get the right equipment it will show off your skills.
 

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I've seen amazing players that sucked because of there equipment.
If they are blaming their equipment for sucking, then they are not amazing players.

For example, a professional racecar driver in a Prius can beat a 16 year old learner driver in a Ferrari around a racetrack, every time. The equipment matters, but only after you've actually learned your craft.

When you are starting out, just get what is easy for you to play and what you think sounds good (preferably in that order - if you can only sound good for 5 minutes before your embouchure gives out, it's not the setup for you). Otherwise, your equipment will always be a crutch, not a benefit to your playing.
 
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