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Discussion Starter #1
Hi.

I am looking for a new Tenor Saxophone mouthpiece to help support me with my playing. I am unhappy with the tone and sound quality produced by my current one, which is the one that was included in my sax when I bought it a couple of years ago. The mouthpiece makes certain notes that are already predisposed to stuffiness even worse- for example middle D.

The saxophone I am using right now is a Trevor James Classic Horn. I have been playing saxophone for around seven years.

I am currently playing a mixture of classical sax music for my grades and big band music with my bands, so I need a good all rounder mouthpiece that will help me access the higher and lower registers of the horn easier and produce a better sound.

If anyone has any recommendations, they would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I've found Morgan Mouthpieces to be of good quality and reasonably priced. Currently using a 5 C on tenor. This is thier classical model. I use it for concert and big band and find it to be very flexible...
 

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I've found Morgan Mouthpieces to be of good quality and reasonably priced. Currently using a 5 C on tenor. This is thier classical model. I use it for concert and big band and find it to be very flexible...
Roy Styffe sounds great on his Morgan Mouthpieces.
 

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With 7 years under your belt, you can probably call yourself intermediate, rather than beginner. Great idea to graduate to the next mouthpiece.

1). If you are in a location that has music shops, at which you can try out mouthpieces, I would recommend going to a shop and trying some (a bunch) out. Every mouthpiece is quite personal.

2). If you have to mail-order, you might consider mpc reviews at neffmusic.com I don’t know the exact URL, but you can Google it.

3). You may want to take the opportunity to bump up to a 6 or 7 mouthpiece. Your embouchure can probably handle it. I realize you are not a jazz player...but if you are ever considering it, the smaller tips such as 5, probably won’t be able to get there.

4) Every mouthpiece is going to work differently on your horn. Fortunately, you have a modern horn, and they tend to be very responsive to mouthpiece changes.

Good luck.
 

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You mentioned some notes on your horn being prone to "stuffiness"-- even though it's a relatively new horn, I highly recommend a routine adjustment. In my experience, to quote Dr. Henry "Indiana" Jones, Jr., "It's not the years, it's the miles." New mouthpiece, fresh tune-up, and you'll feel like a million bucks (probably sound better, too!)
 

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Getting to a store that has a decent selection and trying a bunch is the best way to find something you like. That said, if you can't do that (and I don't know your budget), for a production mouthpiece, Vandoren has good quality control, and I like their V16HR as a good all-around piece that is not too expensive. For moderately-priced handmade pieces, maybe check out Phil-Tone's stuff.
 

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I’ll give another nod for the Morgan “C” pieces, given the mix of music that the OP cites.

I play a 6C for classical quartet, and usually a .110 or so for big band. I got a short notice call to sit in for a big band concert and had only my Morgan available - it played fine. Given adequate air support and good air stream, the Morgan classical pieces can produce a full sound without compromise. Highly recommended.
 
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