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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a very recent addition the the Buescher Fan club.

Among a few mouthpieces that I own and a few that is on its way to me as we speak I have a Rascher mouthpiece. Not a chance I'm letting it go! I'm having a whale of a time with this one. I've read that this mouthpiece is harder to play - has more resistance - than mouthpieces with smaller chambers. But, strangely enough, I find this mouthpiece easier to play than the Selmer S80 C*'s (note: plural) that I own. The S90 is a better fit for me.

Was wondering what all of you fellow Buescherians play. I would like to pick your brains and ask:

What would you recommend for a hollow but still expressive (not bright) sound?
 

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For a long time, I used a Meyer 6S-Medium Chamber. Then, I picked up a Don Sinta with no other markings (was told the tip was similar to a Selmer's C* on a Zinner blank). It outplayed my Meyer, using a Vandoren ZZ #2 reed.

But not too long ago, i was fooling around with various mouthpieces in my stash and fitted a Fibracell 1 1/2 Premier to my old Selmer S-80 C*. That was the hot ticked for me. I've used that C* on all of my altos (vintage and modern, including three different Buescher altos . . . TT, Big B, and TH&C). The key for me is the synthetic reed. So far, I haven't found a cane reed that matches the Fibracell on this mouthpiece.

Other pieces I've used on my Buescher altos were the Selmer Soloist F, and the Selmer Super Session F (a very warm and dark sound for me), to name two. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Further clarification just for in case.

The Rascher mouthpiece is an exceptional mouthpiece for classical playing and provides one with that hollow, haunting tone. But when one wants to push the tonal boundaries a bit with this piece - different reeds (and possibly ligatures - but let's not get into that please) can get you only so far. So, to my mind, it lacks a bit on the expressive side.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just goes to show. A mouthpiece traditionally labeled as a "classical" mouthpiece doesn't need to be one.

Mmm...synthetic reeds. Now that I haven't tried. I'm all for experimentation. Instead of buying a new mouthpiece I should rather experiment with reeds for a while. Will certainly be a lot cheaper.
 

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synt reeeds are a waste of money and time IMHO. I play on largeish chamber pieces with no baffle, just a very subtle rollover. If you need some extra "bark" you can go with thinner rails and open tips, if you need more control and extr darkness even under "pressure" thicker rails and smaller tips.
 

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Yes, then again a slight rollover baffle might do the trick.
I'm pretty there are no mpcs that lack at least a slight rollover baffle. In other words, the big chamber, 'baffle-free' mpcs all have at least a slight rollover baffle. If I have that wrong, then one of the mpc experts can chime in and correct me.

I assume the OP is talking about altos (not sure why I assume that, but I do). Believe it or not, I really like an Otto Link tone edge on my '29 True Tone alto, which has a fairly large chamber. Nice, fat, rich sound. But I should qualify that with the fact that I rarely play alto and so haven't done an extensive mpc search for it.
 

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JL and Skoothondjie, there's no thing as "no rollover" for open chambers past a very closed tip opening, you guys are absolutely right. As you go open and open, there's more material for you to craft anything from .100" to .225" rollover (lenght from the tip) giving your open chamber just about that "zing" and "pop" it will render a dull piece something playable beyond victrolaish period very dated sounds.

My main tenor piece is a .108 TM NY link, I have also an old slant HR link in .118, both huge chambers with round chamber floors. I've played old links in my alto too, especially liking Link Reso Chambers in the alto, at about .080/.095 tips. On soprano I've played my own pieces most of the time, wich are any blank with a huge bulgeous chamber and very short rollover like the other pieces, in .070/.080 tips.

After most of my shedding hours done on clarinets (soprano, alto and bass) there's nothing that properly trained airstream in conjuction with an open chamber can't match (I mean novelty baffles, "dual" chambers, etc etc.

Throughout my years of MPC fiddling I've come to the conviction that there's a certain proportion more than "true large chamber" or such concept. If the throat's right and large but you have too much rollover, the sound becomes glassy and shrill when pushed. IMHO if you need more "presence" you have to use a smaller chamber, still keeping good floor angles, scooped sidewalls and short rollover. Much a la old meyer alto pieces, those pieces were smaller chambers but keeping a certain shape and proportions that made them brighter still manageable.
 

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Here are some pieces I've enjoyed using on Bueschers in the "unbright" tonal bag.

Medium dark tone with some volume:
Woodwind Co. New York, B, D, K, or '36 series (slightly smaller barrel chamber than Rascher/Buescher - mellow '30s sound)
Meliphone or Dick Stabile Special (Woodwind Co., straight sidewalls, metal shank)

Medium tone, gentle edge:
Brilhart Ebolin (black plastic/white insert, horseshoe shape chamber)
Brilhart Tonalin (ivory plastic/black insert, same chamber)
Buescher True-Tone (white plastic, same chamber - as supplied with Top Hat 400s)

Medium tone, gentle to medium edge:
Bilger-Morgan J series (round chamber)
Morgan C or L series (round chamber)

All but the Morgan C and L are vintage pieces. The Bilger-Morgans date to the 1970s-80s, the rest to the 1930s to 60s era.

Brilharts with serial numbers are collectibles. Those stamped "Great Neck, N.Y." date from 1939-53 and are the most sought after. Those with just a serial (from Carlsbad, Calif., 1954-66) are not quite so expensive, those with no serial (after 1966) less so yet.

The vintage hard rubber Brilharts, with round medium chambers, are very good, but I sound nearly as bright on them as I do on Meyers. So they may not be your thing.
 

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This is just for my two cents' worth, because the Rascherian tonal concept isn't mine at all and I don't dedicate any time to the kind of mouthpieces associated with it, but skoot's description of the "hollow" tonal quality reminds me of the mouthpiece that came with my 1946 "400" tenor, which was a Buescher "400" tenor mouthpiece. It had a narrow tip opening, big round chamber, and negligible baffle. Also, I've got a 1920's Buescher tenor mouthpiece that has an even bigger chamber, even less baffle (the floor is pretty much scooped out) and thicker rails than that on the 400 mouthpiece.

With a harder reed the "400" mouthpiece played very well on the 400 tenor and got a very dark, pretty, rich tone -- but with a "hollow", airy core. The 1920's mouthpiece has a denser core, though it doesn't really play "darker" than the 400 mouthpiece did. FWIW!!
 

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I do find that the Selmers (S-80 and S-90) tend to work well on most vintage horns but I have played Selmers on alto for over 45 years. I do find that the Martins don't like the Super Sessions too well. The above post that mentioned the Woodwind Co. reminded me of how nice the K5* is. I have had a few and they are very nice for alto.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm pretty there are no mpcs that lack at least a slight rollover baffle. In other words, the big chamber, 'baffle-free' mpcs all have at least a slight rollover baffle. If I have that wrong, then one of the mpc experts can chime in and correct me.

I assume the OP is talking about altos (not sure why I assume that, but I do). Believe it or not, I really like an Otto Link tone edge on my '29 True Tone alto, which has a fairly large chamber. Nice, fat, rich sound. But I should qualify that with the fact that I rarely play alto and so haven't done an extensive mpc search for it.
Yes, I have an alto. But the discussion needn't be limited to only alto set-ups. I also have a '29 True Tone! I'm starting to think that the Link Tone Edge that I've purchased a few days ago might do the trick, then.

JL, what's the tip opening on your Link and has there been any work done on your Link?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Here are some pieces I've enjoyed using on Bueschers in the "unbright" tonal bag.

Medium dark tone with some volume:
Woodwind Co. New York, B, D, K, or '36 series (slightly smaller barrel chamber than Rascher/Buescher - mellow '30s sound)
Meliphone or Dick Stabile Special (Woodwind Co., straight sidewalls, metal shank)

Medium tone, gentle edge:
Brilhart Ebolin (black plastic/white insert, horseshoe shape chamber)
Brilhart Tonalin (ivory plastic/black insert, same chamber)
Buescher True-Tone (white plastic, same chamber - as supplied with Top Hat 400s)

Medium tone, gentle to medium edge:
Bilger-Morgan J series (round chamber)
Morgan C or L series (round chamber)

All but the Morgan C and L are vintage pieces. The Bilger-Morgans date to the 1970s-80s, the rest to the 1930s to 60s era.

Brilharts with serial numbers are collectibles. Those stamped "Great Neck, N.Y." date from 1939-53 and are the most sought after. Those with just a serial (from Carlsbad, Calif., 1954-66) are not quite so expensive, those with no serial (after 1966) less so yet.

The vintage hard rubber Brilharts, with round medium chambers, are very good, but I sound nearly as bright on them as I do on Meyers. So they may not be your thing.
I also have a white Buescher mouthpiece. Too bright for me.
It looks like I should watch out for Woodwind Co. mouthpiece.
 

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JL, what's the tip opening on your Link and has there been any work done on your Link?
Alto HR Tone Edge, 7 opening (not sure what that translates to in mm). No work ever done on it. I bought it stock. I do remember trying some Meyers and other mpcs at the store and I liked the Link best. You have to put some air in it, but the tone quality is really good, especially on the TT alto. But like I said, I'm mainly a tenor player. And I'm not a classical player.

On Buescher tenors, I've found lots of mpcs that work great.
 

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Call or email Erik Greiffenhagen at Morgan mouthpieces, Ralph's history with Buescher made him the authority. Ralph made me a 7L years back saying it would be great on my Big B, he was right and no other mouthpiece I tried has ever come close. Erik can help you.

JR
 

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My alto True Tone came with its original Buescher mouthpiece, which makes mine sound as if it's coming out of a victrola. I don't play classical, but prefer the Meyer styled pieces for jazz and rock. I've used a NY-USA vintage Meyer and then an SR Tech Legend (85) before settling on an RPC rollover which I've used for years now. None of these pieces I would describe as overly bright.
 

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My alto True Tone came with its original Buescher mouthpiece, which makes mine sound as if it's coming out of a victrola.
An Orthophonic from the late 20s? Or one of the early Roman numeral models?
 

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An Orthophonic from the late 20s? Or one of the early Roman numeral models?
It reads "The Buescher Elkhart Ind." in an oval with Eb below it. The shank also has a lip around it. It's a 228K horn and I assumed the mouthpiece was original.
 
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