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I wish there was a mouthpiece that had an adjustable table. If your reed is too hard, you can turn a screw and the back of the table lifts up making the tip opening more closed. If the reed is too soft, you turn it the other way and the back of the table moves downward making the tip opening larger until the soft reed feels perfect. Runyon or somebody probably already tried this but I just thought it would be a cool invention........The hard part would be trying to connect it to the facing curve so that it always gets a seal I guess..........
 

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I dont know if someone ever made one but i ve seen two patents for that idea.
In both cases it was not practical and i dont think it would had worked precisely of the facing problems
Yeah, I guess you would change the facing starting point every time you raised or lowered the table. I use to know a guy that used to put a small piece of folded up paper under the back of the reed and he said it helped him play reeds that were too hard.
 

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These existed at one point. Ralph Morgan had one in his personal collection. It was sold on ebay a few years back. I have pictures somewhere on a storage drive. Here is the description that was used on ebay:

"This was in the mouthpiece collection of mouthpiece maker Ralph Morgan. I have never seen one of these and was not sure what it was, but I think I have figured it out. It has an adjustable wedge under the table which changes the size of the tip opening. The tip opening measures .050 - .065 depending on where the wedge is set. Interesting concept, but probably more of a collector item than for a serious player. Large round chamber with no baffle. It is marked, France."

Not sure who the maker was. The only markings were "France". Probably made in the 1930s / 1940s. If I can find the pics, I will post them.
 

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'put a small piece of folded up paper under the back of the reed and he said it helped him play reeds that were too hard.'

It is amazing the things people think of - this actually sounds workable.
 

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'put a small piece of folded up paper under the back of the reed and he said it helped him play reeds that were too hard.'

It is amazing the things people think of - this actually sounds workable.
Not really, If the pivot point is where the facing starts then the part of the window behind that point will be a gap and will leak .
 

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I wish there was a mouthpiece that had an adjustable table. If your reed is too hard, you can turn a screw and the back of the table lifts up making the tip opening more closed. If the reed is too soft, you turn it the other way and the back of the table moves downward making the tip opening larger until the soft reed feels perfect. Runyon or somebody probably already tried this but I just thought it would be a cool invention........The hard part would be trying to connect it to the facing curve so that it always gets a seal I guess..........
I had one that Joe Allard gave me. The trouble is that it would lengthen the facing as you opened it. Also, it wouldn't solve the problem because the chamber has so much to do with resistance. Phil Barone
 

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The 1992 catalogue from Bill Lewington in London (priced in GB Pounds) includes the following:

STRATHONN [sic]

JAMIN
If you've ever had one of those customers who bugs you about tip openings, this is the mouthpiece you need. The scaffolding gizmo attached to the mouthpiece varies the tip opening and will keep him happy for years.

JCL Clarinet Bb, facings 4, 5, 6 - - - - - -115.70



Pictures here: https://www.ebay.ie/itm/Jamin-Clari...739775?hash=item239de2c4bf:g:l-kAAOSwiuxaxnco I don't know whether they made any saxophone models.

Rhys
 

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These existed at one point. Ralph Morgan had one in his personal collection. It was sold on ebay a few years back. I have pictures somewhere on a storage drive. Here is the description that was used on ebay:

"This was in the mouthpiece collection of mouthpiece maker Ralph Morgan. I have never seen one of these and was not sure what it was, but I think I have figured it out. It has an adjustable wedge under the table which changes the size of the tip opening. The tip opening measures .050 - .065 depending on where the wedge is set. Interesting concept, but probably more of a collector item than for a serious player. Large round chamber with no baffle. It is marked, France."

Not sure who the maker was. The only markings were "France". Probably made in the 1930s / 1940s. If I can find the pics, I will post them.
Members of Daniel Defayet's Sax Quartet played them years ago, the tenor player I think, and Defayet himself on alto.
 

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Not really, If the pivot point is where the facing starts then the part of the window behind that point will be a gap and will leak .
It could work if the pivot point was beyond the window opening. Whether it would sound any good for most people is a different issue because the facing curve would probably be too long. Plus the probability that (depending on how it's done) the physics involved in the the actual pivot would compromise the facing curve. I can't imagine it working without there being a tighter curve at the pivot, so the design is there to aid the functionality as opposed to the sound.

I find that people tend to overemphasise the importance of a tip opening, when really it is just one of the factors involved in how the mouthpiece feels and behaves. I hear people say they "play a .105" as if that has the same characteristics across different makes/models. Hardly anyone references the dimensions of the facing curve or chamber diameter/volume which is really just as important.
 

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It could work if the pivot point was beyond the window opening. Whether it would sound any good for most people is a different issue because the facing curve would probably be too long. Plus the probability that (depending on how it's done) the physics involved in the the actual pivot would compromise the facing curve. I can't imagine it working without there being a tighter curve at the pivot, so the design is there to aid the functionality as opposed to the sound.

I find that people tend to overemphasise the importance of a tip opening, when really it is just one of the factors involved in how the mouthpiece feels and behaves. I hear people say they "play a .105" as if that has the same characteristics across different makes/models. Hardly anyone references the dimensions of the facing curve or chamber diameter/volume which is really just as important.
+++
Playing a small tipopening combined with a long facing can give you the same kind of experience and resistance as playing a big tip with a shorter facing
 

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I think it invites all kind of problems.

However, like Nef said...he would like it for adjusting for reeds.

you would only need a very small amount of adjustment for a quarter strength or so in reeds. You might just pull it off without messing too much with facing lengths. It would still make a difference but it might just be small enough. OR, you might then feel like you have to find a brighter or darker reed that is the same strength as the reed you adjust for. So basically the thing may create far more problems than it addresses. Overall Im pretty confident that it did not become an industry standard for a reason.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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+++
Playing a small tipopening combined with a long facing can give you the same kind of experience and resistance as playing a big tip with a shorter facing
I'm sure that might all depend on your type of embouchure (position of lower jaw on reed).

You can try a crude experiment by holding a reed over the edge of a table. (OK, not a curve as the "pivot" would be a right angle). You can test the pressure required to bend different amounts of reed that are sticking over the table edge. (More reed = long facing, less reed = short facing)

The results will vary depending on whether the pressure is at the tip or away from the tip.
 

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Steve, even if you could do this, I think you are making a pretty major assumption. It seems to be a widely accepted 'fact' that the wider the tip opening, the softer the reed you need (and vice versa). Certainly there is a grain of truth in that, especially if you are comparing a very large discrepancy in tip size. However, I've found that I used exactly the same size reed on a mpc range from 7 to 9* (Rigotti Gold 3 light, V16 2.5, regardless of the mpc tip size). Maybe if I used a much smaller tip, I'd need a slightly harder reed to keep it from closing up, but I'm not even sure about that.

In short, I think the whole idea of changing reed strength with a larger or smaller tip opening is overblown, at least until you are talking about a really extreme change in tip opening. Probably because other factors are involved (chamber size/shape, facing curve, embouchure, personal preference in reed strength, etc).
 

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I use a reed instead of paper to do this'd it works very good


Yeah, I guess you would change the facing starting point every time you raised or lowered the table. I use to know a guy that used to put a small piece of folded up paper under the back of the reed and he said it helped him play reeds that were too hard.
 
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