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Cannonball Adderley solo on Sack O'Woe : https://yadi.sk/d/zirIY5SBJdvnYg

Full solo;

Linear fragments;

Motivic fragments ;


Graphic display of the ratios of these two melodic elements on a time vector.

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In principle, such a division of melodic elements is somewhat crude, because phrasing also contains transitional stages from sequences of motives to linearity, and vice versa; however, then a more in-depth analysis of the melody is required. This categorization is more suitable for students studying improvisation, but not those who already own it to a large extent. Each mature improviser is characterized by the presence of these two elements in various proportions.
Anyone who starts to learn improvisation from scales risks risking falling into the field of boring dull, scale-like , phrases that express nothing more than theory.
 

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You do realize that if Cannon played that tune every night for a two week engagement, your statistics would probably be dramatically different for each time he played it, right?

And how would you account for things like the "Patented Sonny Stitt lick"? Or the fact that Charlie Parker dropped the High Society piccolo solo into damn near everything? Of course, Johnny Hodges could play an entire scale without even having to change his fingering...
 

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Interesting analysis and food for thought on keeping a balance between the two. I suppose part of it would be to define the definition of scale "any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch" whereas a motive is a "short musical phrase, a salient recurring figure, musical fragment or succession of notes that has some special importance in or is characteristic of a composition... the smallest structural unit possessing thematic identity". Since a motive is a "succession of notes" I guess a scale could possibly actually be a motive since it's a succession of notes and can be characteristic of the composition. Some scales are relatively short- certainly short enough to be called a motive. If scales can be played in a non-musical way (as is your contention) is it also possible for a motive to be played in a non-musical way? Or is a motive necessarily "musical"?
 

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You do realize that if Cannon played that tune every night for a two week engagement, your statistics would probably be dramatically different for each time he played it, right?

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If only, for each next concert a new Cannonball Adderley was made. But I don't think so; therefore, the main thinking remains. The proportions are changing, the principle - not.

The same in 1967:

https://yadi.sk/d/i2hotRFC200ZqA
 

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Interesting analysis and food for thought on keeping a balance between the two. I suppose part of it would be to define the definition of scale "any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch" whereas a motive is a "short musical phrase, a salient recurring figure, musical fragment or succession of notes that has some special importance in or is characteristic of a composition... the smallest structural unit possessing thematic identity". Since a motive is a "succession of notes" I guess a scale could possibly actually be a motive since it's a succession of notes and can be characteristic of the composition. Some scales are relatively short- certainly short enough to be called a motive. If scales can be played in a non-musical way (as is your contention) is it also possible for a motive to be played in a non-musical way? Or is a motive necessarily "musical"?
The definition of musical structures in the West suffers from a lack of the concept of "Intonation" (melodic curve). If Rhythm is king, then Intonation is queen. Both of them are many times more important than a scale, arpeggio or lick. The doctrine of musical intonation was published in Russia at the beginning of the 20th century by the theoretician Boleslav Yavorsky - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boleslav_Yavorsky.
From the Western theorists, Ernst Kurt came closest to the theory of intonation in his work " Fundamentals of Linear Counterpoint " , without using the term "intonation", but using the concepts of "melodic energy embedded between notes."
The scale, taken by itself, contains the values of color and source of building material; but it’s not music yet - like a pile of stones it is not yet a building.
The C melodic minor scale at the beginning of the piano part of Beethoven's 3rd concerto, repeated three times, gets musical meaning only in the continuation and end of the sentence, where the rhythm and intonation change; and in the end is pronounced "Jawohl, jawohl! (Yes, yes!)"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_lf1lJIb2Y - 3:54
 

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Thank you for the info.- I was not familiar with Yavorsky or the term "melodic energy between notes". I'm not sure if you consider linear fragments pieces of scales, but, if so, initially learning improvisation in terms of scales (and arpeggios) seems to be a logical initial starting point. I guess the key would be to always be mindful of the purpose of the whole thing- to make something musical.
 

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. I'm not sure if you consider linear fragments pieces of scales, but, if so, initially learning improvisation in terms of scales (and arpeggios) seems to be a logical initial starting point. I guess the key would be to always be mindful of the purpose of the whole thing- to make something musical.
I distinguish the scale as source of the building material for melody, and the CST, which quite aggressively imposes a scale-like melodic thinking. The first can be found on the black keys of the piano or in the ancient African instruments Balafon and Marimba. African musical culture was also a source of instruments that reproduced the speech intonation - talking drums; which appeared long before instruments with fixed tuning . In other words, the history of African music itself demonstrates the primacy of intonation of speech melody over a musical melody.Languages scholars point to the duality inherent in spoken languages ​​as a means of communication: semantic, directed toward consciousness, and intonational, directed toward subconsciousness. Each theater actor is familiar with this; every jazz musician - unlikely!

I'm not sure if you consider linear fragments pieces of scales
Of course, how can you do without this if they fit into the line of intonation, and also supply energy of movement?
 

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Bird - Night in Tunisia Bird  -   Night in Tunisia.jpg

https://yadi.sk/d/LcfR0ke4oisJhQ

There is an interesting order: usually linear fragments are framed by motivic elements ; in this case, the opposite. The initial break leads to the first phrase; the last line elegantly transfers the baton to a trumpeter. Nevertheless, the balance is in favor of motivic fragments.
 
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