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For whom do you most dislike playing and why

  • Family (includes your dad's friends who always ask if you know Yakkety Sax)

    Votes: 28 31.1%
  • Your friends

    Votes: 5 5.6%
  • Your saxophone playing friends (not really your friends)

    Votes: 11 12.2%
  • wife/girlfriend/life partner

    Votes: 3 3.3%
  • Sax teachers or old band directors

    Votes: 9 10.0%
  • Old people

    Votes: 7 7.8%
  • Chuck Norris

    Votes: 27 30.0%
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Distinguished SOTW Columnist TSGT(Ret)USAF
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First of all , I love playing for old people,
They apprieciate it so much!!
I hate playing for other sax players, it always turns into some kind of test or challange
" I know this lick, then they know that lick,...."
then the dreaded super prygian scale divided up into fourths,
played in fast triplets...
I wish people would just play pretty melodies,
The sax is great as a solo instrument, playing the head...
No-one wants to play the head anymore...
They want to make up their own head...
 

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jstin4all said:
Ok, from now on we'll lump "rich old drunk people" in with the "old people response".
Not for me. Though I don't like the rich, cocktail party set, that can be folks in their thirties. No, old folks love the old tunes, and if you play them, you'll know their appreciation. They can be the best audiences, really.
 

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jstin4all said:
Ok, from now on we'll lump "rich old drunk people" in with the "old people response"
Not for me, either. "Rich" and "old" don't really fit together at all. Who says old people are rich? A few are, but a lot more are poor! I guess if you are 15 years old, then everyone who is rich would be old to you. Anyway, age has little to do with it, in terms of a good audience, unless you are playing a specific genre of music that seems to appeal to one age group. I think jazz and blues run across the board, age-wise. Although it may be true that folks with more "life experience" are drawn to jazz/blues.

Maybe in some cases rich people haven't had the time to really listen to music, but overall I wouldn't generalize here either. I do know if I spent my youth working 15 hours a day, instead of prowling the clubs in search of great jazz, I might be rich, but only in monetary terms.
 

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Well yeah, if you're getting paid what you want for it, any gig is great. Still, some audiences just have no appreciation. Like the society lady who comes up on the band stand in the middle of a number to stop the band to make an announcement that could have easily waited another chorus. Tough to enjoy what you're doing when stuff like that happens.
 

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I personally loved it when Nick Brignola was playing a club and these people just WOULDN'T SHUT UP so Nick empties his water key on their table. Another time I saw Lee Konitz in Halifax and he had the same type of couple. Bear in mind that, as with Nick's gig, this was an environment intended for listening not continuous conversation. Konitz just walked over to their table and played with the bell of his alto between the couple.

Some would call this rude but, in both cases, the audience was asked more than once to limit conversation.
 

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In contrast to some here, drunk people don't bother me at all. They're generally so flexible anything sounds great to them - and they're rarely shy in expressing their appreciation. Like others here, however, I don't like to play to yuppie audiences that consider the band to be part of the atmosphere. You could be playing at your absolute best in that situation, and while some may notice, very few will condescend to acknowledge. Very cold -even when attentive.
 

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knighttrain said:
You could be playing at your absolute best in that situation, and while some may notice, very few will condescend to acknowledge. Very cold -even when attentive.
Yeah i know how you feel I was playing a solo with altissimo and growls and the whole 9 yards at a high school and at the end I got a cough and 2 claps, lets just say last time i ever play a solo for them
 

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Hotspur said:
Yeah i know how you feel I was playing a solo with altissimo and growls and the whole 9 yards at a high school and at the end I got a cough and 2 claps, lets just say last time i ever play a solo for them
If the audience isn't listening anyway, play for the other musicians in the ensemble. Not to show off but so that you can try to create some sort of musical dialogue between one another. If someone listens and likes it, that's a bonus. I don't play altissimo to please the crowd; I play it because I consider it part of the instrument's range.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
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Tim Price said:
A GIG IS A GIG.
Play your horn and enjoy it.:cool:
When the master speaks...
I was about to write a whole ramble about audiences being insignificant since it's the opportunity to play that counts, and that drunks can get pretty carried away with the music so I don't hate them as long as they don't come too close, and about being background music as a comfortable position for a musician since nobody will even notice when you miss a note or two, and the joy of having response, especially when the public goes mad on the tunes of your band and but that the main joy comes from being on that stage and being able to play...And then I read Tims comment....

...I nod my head in silence
 

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Last night I played for a large group of people in a convention center, and Chuck Norris was in the audience.
By the end of the first chorus he had already wiped out all the drunks, the yuppies, the old people, and most of the kindergarten teachers.
Then he started on my sax-playing friends, my other friends, people who hate me (which pretty much took care of the rest of the audience), the astronauts and the old band directors. He had a lot of fun with the Salvation Army guys, along with the Elvis impersonator.
By the second chorus he round-kicked my wife, punched my daughter, kicked my dog, and tied my son into a pretzel. Then he worked on the chef, the waiters, the maitre d', and the wine steward, as well as the bell hops and the parking attendants. Calls to 911 went unanswered.
During the solo, he destroyed the entire North Vietnamese army.
I was valiantly trying to carry on (the show must go on . . . ) when he knocked out the entire rhythm section with a well-placed back kick, and then got my piano player with a dirty look.
He finally came up to me, and as I stood there trembling pitifully before him, he asked me if I was ever going to play "Yakety Sax" like Kenny G.
 

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I always love playing for older people because they appreciate that I detest the "new crap" that's corupting minds left and right just about as fast as Chuck Norris kills people. The one crowd I absolutely detest playing infront of, my guitarist uncle who thinks he has a better knowledge of jazz than me over the year he's been playing rock guitar.
 

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PLEASE, enough with the Chuck Norris! (or am I the only one who finds it tedious)..

Prime Sax said:
Last night I played for a large group of people in a convention center, and Chuck Norris was in the audience.
By the end of the first chorus he had already wiped out all the drunks, the yuppies, the old people, and most of the kindergarten teachers.
Then he started on my sax-playing friends, my other friends, people who hate me (which pretty much took care of the rest of the audience), the astronauts and the old band directors. He had a lot of fun with the Salvation Army guys, along with the Elvis impersonator.
By the second chorus he round-kicked my wife, punched my daughter, kicked my dog, and tied my son into a pretzel. Then he worked on the chef, the waiters, the maitre d', and the wine steward, as well as the bell hops and the parking attendants. Calls to 911 went unanswered.
During the solo, he destroyed the entire North Vietnamese army.
I was valiantly trying to carry on (the show must go on . . . ) when he knocked out the entire rhythm section with a well-placed back kick, and then got my piano player with a dirty look.
He finally came up to me, and as I stood there trembling pitifully before him, he asked me if I was ever going to play "Yakety Sax" like Kenny G.
 

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Forum Contributor 2010 & Distinguished SOTW Member
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kevvieg said:
PLEASE, enough with the Chuck Norris! (or am I the only one who finds it tedious)..
Very tedious.

I agree with Tim Price. I don't care who I am playing for. I am grateful to gig. And... whoever it is I am playing for, they are seconday. I play for ME. If I ain't enjoying playing, I blame myself, not the audience.

Steve
 

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I spent a week playing with Gunnar Mossblad and although he was very very nice, I have not been so intimidated in close to 20 yrs.
 
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