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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am extremely focused and disciplined in the morning. The rest of the day is often taken over by family and work related events but I know I can consistently create 1 1/2 hours of 'me' time in the morning. If I practice I play better but I know if I can lose weight and feel better - I'll also play better. Where's the balance?
 

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In life, the important things should never be put last on the list. Physical exercise, food, romance, music practice, and sex can be sweeter throughout the day.
 

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Practice is a must every day. What about dividing up the time? Half an hour, forty five minutes or an hour of exercise every other day, back and forth with the practice? What about playing and marching. My walking outside and playing in the open air was a shocking experience. It was real work filling up the landscape with sound, and surprisingly difficult to breath, walk, and play for more than a few minutes at first. High knee lifts and squats thrown in. But I live in the country on nine acres with no problematically close neighbors, either. I suppose a treadmill would work ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Put on your sax and practice while hiking up a 4000 foot mountain............Just an idea.
I actually tried a few sessions with soprano on the treadmill but it was ridiculously dangerous. Maybe I'll give the mountain thing a go?
 

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If you are up to it, do high intensity interval training (HIIT). All you need is 20 minutes a day if you do it right. You practice the rest of the hour and a half. Do the HIIT at the end, because you will be seriously out of wind if done properly. The HIIT will get you in great cardiovascular condition. If you also want to lose weight, you need to be in caloric deficit. Most of that comes from diet, not exercise. Get a fitness app, such as MyFitnessPal, and track what you are eating against a daily caloric goal, and make adjustments accordingly.
 

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Have been facing the same dilemma for the past several years. I'm in my late 60s, and figured if I passed on the exercise for practice time, my sax playing might be better, but not if I dropped dead next week. Health comes first. So I work out for an hour and a half every morning (30 min floor work and 60 min cardio daily, and weights every 3rd day), and somehow try to fit in an hour each afternoon for practice - which ends up being more like 5 days a week. And in 20 years, give or take, it won't make a difference anyway.
 

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No question for me here.
Exercise every other day just with more intensety ie burn double the calories, but definitely practice at least 20 min of sax every single day, and don’t do you stupid warms ( on sax,) up just get right into your pleasurable melodic creative things that you’re working on .
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
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No question for me here.
Exercise every other day just with more intensety ie burn double the calories, but definitely practice at least 20 min of sax every single day, and don’t do you stupid warms Dan Sax, on sax, up just get right into your pleasurable melodic creative things that you’re working on .
....but what about the three hours of long tones, two hours of reed maintenance, and an extra hour to swab and dry my kit?
 

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If you are up to it, do high intensity interval training (HIIT). All you need is 20 minutes a day if you do it right. You practice the rest of the hour and a half. Do the HIIT at the end, because you will be seriously out of wind if done properly. The HIIT will get you in great cardiovascular condition. If you also want to lose weight, you need to be in caloric deficit. Most of that comes from diet, not exercise. Get a fitness app, such as MyFitnessPal, and track what you are eating against a daily caloric goal, and make adjustments accordingly.
If you don't warm up for 10 or 15 minutes before interval training you're likely to a. injure yourself b. have a heart attack. Especially if you are over 40.
 

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If you don't warm up for 10 or 15 minutes before interval training you're likely to a. injure yourself b. have a heart attack. Especially if you are over 40.
Most properly structured HIIT workouts include the warmup. What is the scientific basis of the 10-15 minute claim?
 

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Most properly structured HIIT workouts include the warmup. What is the scientific basis of the 10-15 minute claim?


https://www.spectator.co.uk/2014/09/bad-medicine-myth-of-the-warm-up/

"You will also be told that warming up prevents injury, but again the evidence is inconclusive. A systematic review in the Research into Sports Medicine journal (2008) found that static stretching ‘does not reduce overall injury rates’. A review of five studies, published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport in 2006, was similarly uncertain; three found some improvement, two found none."
 

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https://www.spectator.co.uk/2014/09/bad-medicine-myth-of-the-warm-up/

"You will also be told that warming up prevents injury, but again the evidence is inconclusive. A systematic review in the Research into Sports Medicine journal (2008) found that static stretching ‘does not reduce overall injury rates’. A review of five studies, published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport in 2006, was similarly uncertain; three found some improvement, two found none."
Interesting reference. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Interesting reference. Thanks for sharing.
I have heard both assertions many times. I always warm up, from habit, but I no longer assert that it is necessary for health or safety reasons.
 

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Most properly structured HIIT workouts include the warmup. What is the scientific basis of the 10-15 minute claim?
No scientific proof, just personal experience from working out with swim teams for nearly 30 years. That and common sense. You don't want to shock an aging person's heart into action if you don't have to. It's always better to warm up then hit it hard. As teenagers and younger we'd swim 200-300 yards slow warmup before intervals. As a masters swimmer (in my 40's and 50s) we always did some leisurely laps ( maybe 500-800 yards ) before hitting it hard. Then a 200-300 yard cooldown after the interval sets. This was for a typical 3000-4500 yard workout.

I injured my back in 2006 and sadly can't do it anymore. I swam a slow 1000 yd. set last week and spent 3 days in agony with back pain. Still hurting today. Sad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well after a 3 level back fusion and two shoulder surgeries, high impact anything is a scary thought. I just do a 2 minute easy pace jog on a treadmill and 20 more on an elliptical.
 

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For me it's a medium difficulty yoga class 2-3 days per week. On a good day I hit a bucket of golf balls or play 18 holes (with a cart). Last year I was playing 2-3 days a week. This year it's once a week on a good week. Sad, as the president is known to say.
 

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If you are up to it, do high intensity interval training (HIIT). All you need is 20 minutes a day if you do it right. You practice the rest of the hour and a half. Do the HIIT at the end, because you will be seriously out of wind if done properly. The HIIT will get you in great cardiovascular condition. If you also want to lose weight, you need to be in caloric deficit. Most of that comes from diet, not exercise. Get a fitness app, such as MyFitnessPal, and track what you are eating against a daily caloric goal, and make adjustments accordingly.
These concepts vary with the person's age. At age 50+ (a generalization), required intensity and duration to maintain muscle mass need to increase - so does recovery time. Diet is an interesting issue as well. If you just reduce caloric intake in the absence of exercise, the weight you lose is more likely muscle mass.

Yeah, I'm well over 50, and this is one of those things I am having to experience and learn first hand.
 
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