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Hello.

I have a question about the Morgan Jazz. I'll be getting one of these soon, a 6J or a 7J. I'll be using it mainly for Jazz, but I was also wondering if this mouthpiece is suitable to play Classical music.

Specifically, I've been working on the Creston Sonata, and I'd like to know if it would be flexible enough volumewise to play this piece, and will I be able to get a nice classical sound out of it.

I've been playing alto for a few weeks, playing on a friend's S80 C*, on V16 reeds, and I really dislike it. I'm not used to playing mouthpieces with small facings and It's uncomfortable playing the C*.
 

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In my experience, Morgans are very flexible mouthpieces - I think you could use a Morgan Jazz for a variety of applications, even classical. I actually got all through high school and college on a Morgan 6E, which is supposed to be the "brightest" of all his mouthpieces, and I was able to make it sound just fine for classical music (whoever said classical had to mean "stuffy", anyway?).
I think you mean 6M/6L or 7M/7L, though, not "6J or 7J." The "M" denotes a medium chamber, the "L" denotes a large.
 

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I echo the above sentiments. My current Morgan is a far better piece than my C* and D soloists of years gone by in all respects.
 

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Lil Flip said:
Hello.

I have a question about the Morgan Jazz. I'll be getting one of these soon, a 6J or a 7J. I'll be using it mainly for Jazz, but I was also wondering if this mouthpiece is suitable to play Classical music.

Specifically, I've been working on the Creston Sonata, and I'd like to know if it would be flexible enough volumewise to play this piece, and will I be able to get a nice classical sound out of it.

I've been playing alto for a few weeks, playing on a friend's S80 C*, on V16 reeds, and I really dislike it. I'm not used to playing mouthpieces with small facings and It's uncomfortable playing the C*.
Sorry, but unless your control is absolutely ridiculous, a Morgan Jazz piece (is it the M or L chamber, BTW?) on alto is usually not going to produce a characteristic classical sound. (Yes, I'm sure that people will respond and say that I'm wrong, but how many serious classical players do you know of that play on jazz mouthpieces?) Try listening to some classical recordings and you'll understand what I am talking about.

If you don't like the C*, that's understandable, especially if you are used to more free blowing mouthpieces. You might try a Morgan C mouthpiece in a 3C facing, or a Vandoren V5 series in an A35 facing. You will need harder reeds with these, but they should sound a lot better...
 

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I'm with J.Max here. It's possible to play classical with a dukoff and I can cut wall board with a chainsaw...but why?

Classical mouthpieces are designed to respond in such a way that you can put your attention on the unique nuances present when performing classical rep.

I play a morgan 7e for non legit stuff and would never consider playing classical on it unless I had to.
 

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While my Morgan 6L is great mp, I still like the S80 C* better for legit. The 6L is is bit too resistant and loud for soft sections at pp. Better try a Morgan 3C.
 

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Lil Flip said:
I'll be using it mainly for Jazz, but I was also wondering if this mouthpiece is suitable to play Classical music.

Specifically, I've been working on the Creston Sonata, and I'd like to know if it would be flexible enough volumewise to play this piece, and will I be able to get a nice classical sound out of it.
I understood your original post to mean that you are on a budget, and that you will be playing mostly jazz. That was my situation during those years that I used the 6E. Maybe I was naive, but I didn't think it took that much "control" to rein it in - I just didn't overblow, or bend the notes, or change my air stream as much, and produced what I thought was a nice, crystalline sound (I was using a YAS-23 at the time), both soft and loud. Got nothing but compliments in legit contexts. I think the Morgan was uniquely flexible in this regard - I wouldn't play classical on the Brilhart I now own, for instance. (And if you must do a one-size-fits-all mouthpiece, the Jazz is a better choice than the Excalibur, because it has thicker walls to mellow out the sound a little more).

However, I do realize that the above is not the ideal. So, if you can afford it, by all means get a Morgan 3C in addition to your Morgan Jazz (you can't really "try" them, as Junkdude doesn't accept returns on Morgans -- but you could easily resell any Morgan that has a relatively standard tip opening on this forum). I will probably be getting one too. In fact, maybe I'll buy your 3C if you decide you don't need it. :)
 
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