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Which Digital Pattern is More Effective

  • Pattern 1

    Votes: 2 28.6%
  • Pattern 2

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • They're equal

    Votes: 5 71.4%
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Distinguished SOTW Member
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3,875 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We've all used digital patterns to practice scales. There are 2 I see a lot in books

Pattern 1:
1231
2342
3453
4564 . . . etc

Pattern 2:
1234
2345
3456
4567 . . . etc

A lot of books that give exercises with digital patterns have both of these. The thing is that they're the same pattern, just rhythmically displaced. The first note of Pattern 2 is the 4th note of Pattern 1.

So I was wondering if anyone believes that one pattern serves as a better exercise than the other. My logic tells me no but I thought I'd seek out other opinions.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2007
Joined
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1,142 Posts
I don't think either one is better than the other, but I do think they're both useful.
Maybe the better exercise is the merging the technical and the expressive. Rhythmic, dynamic, and articulation variations could be just a few devices to get there. I know that a lot of times I end up going on auto-pilot when I work on technical studies. Maybe thinking about more than fingers is a way to become more engaged with practice and hopefully produce more musical results. I guess I've gotten a little off topic, but your post sparked that thought. Thanks for that.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, & Forum Contributor 200
Joined
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1,436 Posts
Hopefully the result of practicing this pattern would be to displace it anyway, they're the same thing. Your fingers memory are learning the intervals, your mind can then manipulate them accordingly. They're the same.
 

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Registered
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34 Posts
digital patterns

my teacher recommends
1235
12345321
in major and minor.
He also recomends trying to transpose melodies into digital pattens, so you can play them in any key.
also, play four bar licks and figure them out in digital form, so you can also play them in any key.

Patterns for jazz by Jerry Coker has some in depth digital excercises.
 
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