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So I started on clarinet and have played in every genre of music possible. I started to get into serious doubling about 5 years ago (studied music education so had to learn them all). I took a few lessons but mostly self taught until a year ago when I focused on Oboe and Bassoon for my masters. Halfway done with a degree in multiple woodwinds I find the trend amongst my peers is to stay away from the Double Reeds. I am in the NJ/NY area and I am shocked by the few double reed doublers in the area... I feel as if I know all of them.

1. What are some hesitations for learning double reeds? (price? reeds? lack of teachers?)

2. (Band Directors) How many double reed students do you start a year?

3. It is common practice to have that reed 3 play oboe and reed 4/or5 play bassoon so what do you usually do? (transpose on clarinet? play on flute?)
 

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1. price, perceived difficulty, perceived lack of work

2. N/A

3. Many show books are double lined for clarinet as a sub for oboe/EH, and bass clarinet for bassoon - so that's what is done much of the time
 

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Maybe because 3 is less than 5? Doublers learn saxophone, clarinet, and flute, and then don't want to add any more instruments on.
 

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For musicals it's common for Reed 3 to double on oboe and Reed 4/5 double on bassoon. In stage shows (like behind a singer), you're more likely to find the oboe part in the lead book.

I learned to play oboe for a while - not well, I told people I played "show-boe".

Then I started to study more seriously and learned the difference between the English Horn and and oboe - the English Horn burns longer...

If you're interested in doubling, I suggest that you spend a few hours looking at Ed Joffe's wonderful video interviews - look for JoffeWoodwinds on YouTube or go to joffewoodwinds.com. Great interviews with great musicians and a lot of informative nuggets to be found.
 

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The main reason for this is because there are a lot more non-theatre gigs for sax, flute, and clarinet (commercial music, wedding bands, etc.) Double reeds aren’t really used for these types of gigs. But for someone who wants to focus on theatre gigs the double reeds are a good choice because there are far fewer doublers who play them.
 

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1. Cost, commitment, time, cost...
2. n/a, but Many of the students that could benefit to move to a double reed, often are very talented at their current instrument, and most directors don't want to lose that dedicated, probably first chair, player.
3. What Merlin said.

For what it's worth, my degrees are in English horn/oboe, but I prefer not to play oboe in shows, but I do when called. I do get asked to play flute a lot because I'm a strong flutist. As for cost...I own way too many instruments to complain about that...With the only duplicates being a beginner clarinet and flute, and wooden and plastic recorders.
 

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Love your channel by the way! It gave me a great perspective on the order I plan on buying instruments and what reed books I should strive for.
What's the name of the channel?
 
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