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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently acquired a King Zephyr tenor. The case and instrument had a strong moldy smell, and the high D/Eb/F keys were black! Discarded the case, had instrument repadded, but smell remains in the bore. Any advice on how to deal with this issue?

Thanks.
 

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The person who repadded the instrument should have washed the horn prior installing the new pads, now there is not too much that you can do. Try this.
Take a swab, dip it generously into water with a few drops of essential lemon oil (the one for aromatherapy should be ok) put the swab trough the saxophone body several times, do the same with a neck swab, repeat as many times as possible , let the horn dry on a stand and put a few drops of pure lemon oil inside the horn, for example in the bend of the bell. Air the horn as much as possible.
 

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Recently acquired a King Zephyr tenor. The case and instrument had a strong moldy smell, and the high D/Eb/F keys were black! Discarded the case, had instrument repadded, but smell remains in the bore. Any advice on how to deal with this issue?

Thanks.
Replace the bad (black) pads, then take it apart and wash the whole thing, pads and all. [Be careful to not stick yourself on the springs; and don't forget to oil all the moving joints.]
 

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I find it hard to imagine that a professional repair tech would repad a saxophone and not clean the body thoroughly inside and out once the sax was disassembled. I would suggest you take the sax back to the repair shop that did the work and see what they are willing to do for you.

I am assuming that the work was done by a professional shop and that you paid around $300 - $400 for the repad. If it was done by your uncle Milton in his garage for $75 then you got what you paid for IMO. :mrgreen:
 

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Replace the bad (black) pads, then take it apart and wash the whole thing, pads and all. [Be careful to not stick yourself on the springs; and don't forget to oil all the moving joints.]
he has had that pad job done to the horn already and the " tech" didn't clean the horn which still smells mouldy and that's why he is asking for help and possibly a solution that wouldn't imply to take the whole horn apart again.

The advise that I have offered is based on having done this myself and on someone else, in a similar situation in another thread who has followed my advise and had declare it beneficial
 

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he has had that pad job done to the horn already and the " tech" didn't clean the horn which still smells mouldy and that's why he is asking for help and possibly a solution that wouldn't imply to take the whole horn apart again.

The advise that I have offered is based on having done this myself and on someone else, in a similar situation in another thread who has followed my advise and had declare it beneficial
That was a lousy tech. Yeah, take the horn back to him. Wonder why he didn't replace the palm pads? strange.
 

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my roo pads are black:mrgreen::mrgreen::mrgreen:
 

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Sometimes the mold stink can linger for a long time. Even after a 'cleaning'.
If there is ABSOLUTELY NO SILVER on the horn you can use a light solution of chlorine bleach and water to help deodorize and kill off any remaining spores in the bore. Chlorine bleach causes a nasty discoloration to silver.
Dampen a rag with the soulution and wash out the bell as far down as you can reach. For the rest dampen an old pull through swab and run that through a few times. Don't forget to do the neck!
When I say dampen I mean squeeze out that rag and swab REALLY well.
Allow the horn to air dry on a stand.
If the keys are nickle plated you can wipe down the exterior of the horn using the same solution and DAMP rag.
After it's dry you can repeat the process using clear water to remove the 'residue' and chlorine smell.
Sometimes doing the same thing with rubbing alcohol will take out some of the smell. Again allow the horn to air dry.
Usually after a couple of 'bleach baths' the smell is pretty much gone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks to all for the suggestions. Though I live near Nashville, the "music city" has little to offer in the way of sax technicians. My horn was repadded with Music Medic pads with metal resonators which I supplied. I mentioned the smell in a written note to the technician, but it is obvious that little attention was paid to it. As milandro suggests, I don't want to have the thing taken apart. I had thought about chlorine solution which I have used in the past to get rid of mold on outdoor furniture, etc, but was afraid of what the chemical would do to the brass of the bore if I didn't remove every trace.

Thanks, again, to all.
 

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I would stay away from chlorine and try a more innocent approach that I have suggested first, in case you want to repeat the operation with a chlorine solution you can do it all the same but essential lemon oil is very effective and doesn't affect negatively your horn.
 
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