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For the second time now I've forgotten that my mouthpiece and reed are set up on my horn and left for a couple hours to return to a reed with some green discolouring. It's a newly refaced brass link so I'm thinking rather than it being mold it may be coming from Copper Oxide (the like that often builds in the neck and horn) in the reed fibers. It's notable that there's a dark grain in the brass where its happening. (I'm assuming those darker grains are places that weren't really touched in re-flattening the table.) Anybody have any experience in the matter? Throwing away otherwise perfectly good reeds makes me angry. :mrgreen: Thank you!
 

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Upload some pics so everyone can get a clear idea of what you're talking about. I have had a few reeds get dark gray or blue-ish spots. I have a healthy immune system and decent teeth so I don't worry about it much... Maybe I should?
 

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I had this happen on a Jody Jazz DV purchased new. After a while there was pitting on the rails and it left a green trace on the reeds. I knew the age of the reeds by how bold the green was.

Since I wasn't touching that part of the reed I wasn't concerned.
 
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For the second time now I've forgotten that my mouthpiece and reed are set up on my horn and left for a couple hours to return to a reed with some green discolouring. It's a newly refaced brass link so I'm thinking rather than it being mold it may be coming from Copper Oxide (the like that often builds in the neck and horn) in the reed fibers. It's notable that there's a dark grain in the brass where its happening. (I'm assuming those darker grains are places that weren't really touched in re-flattening the table.) Anybody have any experience in the matter? Throwing away otherwise perfectly good reeds makes me angry. :mrgreen: Thank you!
Verdigris is the common name for a green pigment obtained through the application of acetic acid to copper plates or the natural patina formed when copper, brass or bronze is weathered and exposed to air or seawater over a period of time. It is usually a basic copper carbonate, but near the sea will be a basic copper chloride. If acetic acid is present at the time of weathering, it may consist of copper(II) acetate.
 

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Maintenance of all metal mouthpieces, especially with bare brass tables must be to GENTLY wipe and dry them after playing or they will quickly corrode and rot away.
 

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Is this common practice, your mouthpiece has bare brass on the rails and table because it has been re-faced but not re-plated? One more reason why rubber rules, I reckon!
 

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Maintenance of all metal mouthpieces, especially with bare brass tables must be to GENTLY wipe and dry them after playing or they will quickly corrode and rot away.
This ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

You are creating what is known in the laboratory as a "corrosion cell" - nice experiment, lousy for a mouthpiece.
 

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I rinse my Link STM out after playing with cold water and wipe it dry. I also dry the inside by absorbing all the moisture then I put on a non usable reed that is broken or whatever and that is completely clean and dry. I put the reed on to protect the facing and the tip. The reed is always extended beyond the tip to help absorb any possible impact and then I place the plastic mouthpiece cover on.Then the mouthpiece is placed in its box with padding inside so the mouthpiece can't move around in the box and then the box is placed in a snug compartment of the Vanguard case with the other Link I have. There are several boxes of reeds in there so nothing can move around.
 

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This ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

You are creating what is known in the laboratory as a "corrosion cell" - nice experiment, lousy for a mouthpiece.
Wait! Is this bad? This happens on all my bare brass links when I leave the reed on the mouthpiece. I never thought it made a difference...........
 

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This happened to me with my brass Barone mouthpiece. I will tell you what I did to fix the problem but I don't recommend doing it in case it was harmful for the mouthpiece. Hopefully other members will comment on what I did. I wouldn't mind knowing! I took the smallest amount possible, we are talking a drop, of Flitz paste polish and gently cleaned the table of the mouthpiece. This seemed to work and to my knowledge did not negatively affect my piece.
 

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I'm glad my reeds don't get angry! There's too much anger out there as it is.
 

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Wait! Is this bad? This happens on all my bare brass links when I leave the reed on the mouthpiece. I never thought it made a difference...........
Corrosion ultimately leads to loss of material - either pitting (local) or gross (general) corrosion. I prefer my mouthpieces clean, free of funk and degradation. Preferences...
 

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I think it will take a long, long time for "wet reed corrosion" (aka "WRC") to noticeably affect a bare brass table and facing. I have a Link I refaced in 1982 or 83, completely flattening the table and opening the tip (too far) and played it a LOT, occasionally leaving a reed on for a day or two due to a combination of too many gigs, laziness and the pursuit of (illegal, but high quality) happiness. Once in a while a reed turned a little green on the back, a little sandpaper and a soak cured it, or maybe I just threw it out. I do normally swab out my mouthpiece after playing, so the "funk and degradation level" (FDL) was kept between very low and non-existent. I occasionally rubbed the table and facing with cork grease, wiping it clean right after, to avoid "that brassy taste" (TBT), especially right after I touched up the facing.

The facing is still where I left it, the table is flat and everything looks smooth. It still plays just fine (although at my advanced age, and retirement from the "pro" life, a 0.130" tip is a struggle...).
 

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Ideally you would remove the reed and wipe the mouthpiece after playing a metal mouthpiece. I know this is frequently difficult for seriously-working sax players, but not doing that leads to this:



This was Boots Randolph's Brilhart that he played during his most productive years, and in this partial photo you can see how the table is very corroded. He was doing session after session, playing in his nightclub and touring at the time, so this is what happens. IIRC, this was a very rare Brilhart called the 'Velvet-Tone', and this is a #7.
 
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