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I have a question about how to handle the extra keys found on some vintage horns like the G# trill and fork Eb. What's the consensus on what to do with these keys:

1. Ignore them
2. Learn to use them
3. Modify them so they no longer function
#2 - You never know when something might just come in handy. My modern Jupiter alto, Keilwerth tenor and Yanigasaw soprano and baritone have high F# keys and the Bari also has a low A key. You bet I use those. I also sometimes find a use for the G# trill key on my Conn 6M. My Super 20 tenor has none of these keys....So, I just find other ways to skin the cat.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Super Action 80 Tenor, Buescher 156 Tenor, Yamaha Vito YAS-21 , Kessler Soprano, Superba II Bari
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Generally speaking, vintage horns have more flexible intonation than modern horns. While modern horns strive to play even throughout the entire register, vintage horns have little quirks. For instance, my New Wonder alto has a G2 that's a little fuzzy and resistant when pushed. It's less of something that's a detriment, and more of something that I'm just aware of. When playing the horn, I make an effort to play licks that work with this sound, which is something that I wouldn't do with my Yamaha. Vintage ergonomics are different. Depending upon one's hand size, personal build, and medical conditions, they can find these ergos more or less comfortable than modern Selmer VI layout. Ultimately, it's up to the player to bring the best out of any horn that's in their hands. Not vice versa.
 

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That is interesting. Do you think it is because of the shape of the thumb hook and height of the palm keys? Perhaps more deeply dished (vs worn) pearls? I don't recall noticing such a thing when switching between vintage and modern horns, but I likely play different modern horns than you.
I'm guessing both of those things. I suspect also that my wrists are more comfortable on in-line stone holes. Off-set stacks force my right wrist to rotate in a direction that is uncomfortable.
 
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