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I don't know. I started on a Conn New Wonder alto, then went on to a Martin Committee tenor, then an original Balance Action tenor before playing Mk VI tenors and altos.

I didn't have any terrible problems switching. The offset right hand is sometimes great and at other times not. But overall the great horns played great and the not-so-greats played not so great.

Having an in-tune horn sounds like a good idea. I struggled with my Mk VI alto through two years of college not realizing that the horn might be as much as issue as my chops. That horn was pretty squirrely, but I didn't know at them time.

I think the biggest change from say a Conn to a Selmer is getting used to the added resistance. Not always the case, but it seemed that way to me.

Your kid is going have a better tone on that Buescher than on a YAS 23!
 

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One important thought about the pinky table: The low C# is often very stiff and heavy on older horns because of the articulated G# mechanism. Low B and low Bb are no fun either, but low C# is often the killer on old Buescher and Bundy horns.

That articulated G# is useful from time to time, but not a good tradeoff for the heavy C#, B and Bb.

I throw caution to the wind and cut off the articulation arm with a jeweler's saw or torch.

Yes, I do miss it now and then, but not often.
 

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It can be tricky to get the springs balanced and remove free motion. SML had the perfect solution with articulation tabs on the G# that can be moved to engage/disengage the C# or B.
That's a great feature I've seen on several horns made in France. (We're getting off topic here.)

And yes, I find I need to rebalance the springs. But it works OK if you have the patience.

Overall, I see that people think starting on a vintage horn is ok. I can tell a story that relates to this: My long time buddy used to buy and repad horns to supplement his income. (Lifelong professional musician with no day job.) He once sold an H and A Selmer Bundy to a 12 year old girl, who upon trying the horn loved it. She said it has a good tone unlike the school's Yamaha she's been playing. So she started on a modern horn and chose a vintage horn to replace it. (My friend noted that she was quite gifted.)

Perhaps whatever horn inspires the most should be the choice.
 
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