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Having an issue w my 1974 MK VI Alto. Regardless of MP used, all notes above high G are sharp. MPs vary from a Lawton to a Morgan to a Fobes and all w the same result. In tune at the low and middle octaves. But up higher, all are consistently sharp. All MPs are adjusted to a very similar location about 2/3rds in on the neck.

After reading the various posts, I see one option is to adjust the lip. I'm wondering if there are any other options? Key heights seems to be a potential choice. Any other suggestions?

Since this doesn't happen on want of my other horns (soprano to bass) I am thinking it is this horn. Setup or an odd horn...

Thanks
 

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Saxes are just sharp up there in general. I'd make sure it's in good regulation and practice voicing techniques. I've never played a saxophone that didn't go somewhat sharp in the upper register. Anywhere from 5 to 20 cents sharp is the norm.

What are your other horns and how are they not slightly sharp up there?

How sharp are we talking? More than 20 cents?



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Try pulling the mouthpiece out on the cork a little bit. The mouthpiece position should affect the tuning of the left hand and palm key notes the most since it is closest to them. You may get some flatness in the left hand middle register. See if you can get a good compromise.
 

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These horns are just usually sharp up there! I have the same year VI and I'm lipping every single note either up or down on the entire horn. I think that's why I don't like switching gear - I've been playing the same horn without switching for 18 years now and know how every single note plays at every dynamic level - it's important to know your horn!
 

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Put a liner or partial filling in the neck pip which will flatten A and above.
^^^ THIS ^^^

Quick test - play high A and partially cover the neck's octave hole with your fingernail or a piece of card stock.... To see the full effect of the hole's being oversize (if it is) play high A and release the octave key while maintaining the high A. If this is like my similar-vintage Mk VI was back in the day, I bet the difference between the overtone and the with-octave-key is at least 20 cents.

You can test it further with a thin sliver of plastic (or maybe construction paper?) gently wedged into the neck's octave pip --you should do it in a way that you will be able to push it through with a pipe cleaner or pry up with a safety pin or similar when done. I think you will like the test results.

The farther above A you get, the less effect it will have.

If the filling is too thick, jumps into the upper octave will not respond easily. I usually do this with a piece of thin sheet teflon (from MusicMedic) when required, and usually only have to make the liner go 1/2 the circumference of the pip to get the desired effect.
 
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