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I understand your point, but did you read the entire OP? Do you really think, based on the information provided, that he really wants/needs a Mark VI and that should be the only option discussed in the thread?
I did and I thought so, he is asking where and how to find a Mark VI the cheapest possible way, regardless, answering with unrequested suggestions is a phenomenon happening with increasing frequency and it baffles me.
 

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My yani 992 t is so amazing my friend wanted to trade me his Mark V1 I kid you not
Now, that's funny. And I'm a Yanagisawa fan.
From my experience with buying anything high-dollar, cash talks, bull****e walks. It's a buyers market now.You may have a good shot at getting a good price from an owner. Some of those shops, doubt it.
 

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WRL: Here's another opinion; you are obviously young and did not grow up with a MK VI, so IMO you should have no need for one at this time. Later, after you've made a fortune as a sax player and can indulge yourself, you can buy as many of them as you want :). But for the forseeable future, please forget about a MK VI. Start going around and playing new saxes until you find what you want - it's not only fun, it's very enlightening. Saxes today are not only the best they have ever been, there is also a huge selection of pro models. When I was young, there was mainly Selmer Paris, and they made the MK VI. Now Selmer makes an array of models. I would recommend a Super Action 80 Series III, but there are numerous other choices. I've always liked Yanagisawa too, and the tenor with Sterling silver neck and bell really does it for me. I mean, if you are going to get some money to buy a horn, don't waste it paying collector value for what should be a horn to play every day. The Selmer Paris horns of the MK VI era were hand-built compared to today's technology. This of course made them highly variable but also produced a small amount of exceptional examples as well as a small amount of less-responsive ones. The great majority were good horns to varying degrees. So, your chances of scoring a great MK VI tenor strictly by luck are not odds that I would put any money on. Even if you did, you're still dealing with a very old instrument that is going to drain your wallet at every turn; replacement necks are basically not available, shops jack up the price for everything associated with maintaining/repairing one, replacement clamp collars (neck receiver) and other parts are not available. I bought my last MK VI tenor in 1998, and I mean 'the last'. Nothing wrong with the horn, but I just turned 68, so who knows for how long I'll need a pro-grade sax, or any sax for that matter? But you didn't grow up with one, like I said, so really you should have no need for one. Particularly to get through hi-school and college with. Practically all saxophones in these environments suffer serious damage - this is why they sell 'student models' - less money is being risked in the hands of children.
Bottom line, if you want a better sax to play with, fine, but you probably should not even consider dragging a rare, expensive MK VI through hi-school and college.
 

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Most people that are telling others that a MkVI is not worth it are people that have had one. Yes me too. I have two. I also have Guardala's. As much as I joke about it I really do believe that they sound/feel the most like a MkVI of the horns that I have tried. I also own King, Big B, Martin ComIII, Toneking, Cannonball, Beaugnier. I have bought enough horns and look at them constantly. I know what they sell for.

It is possible to find a good MkVI for $4500. You may have to look a bit. It may even be original lacquer. Even if its a relac who cares. 10years from now it will still be worth $4500 if you bough carefully. It may be worth more.

So you buy a new Yamaha 875 for about $4300+. Ten years later its worth $2500.
Buy a Cannonball new for $2800. Ten years later its worth 1400 maybe
Buy a Viking new for about $2100. 6 months later its worth $1600
My Guardala 10 years ago was $2600. Now worth about 2000

Clealy the best buy is a used horn. Personnaly I would rather have three used Cannonball, Viking, and Guardala. However the only horn that does not loose money is the careful purchase of a MkVI. If you dont need the MKVI ergos, than the purchase of a vintage Buescher or Martin can be a money maker!
 

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Lots of advice to try different horns. However, so much has been said and written about the Mark VI that the only way to determine fact from myth is to play as many VI's as you can and preferably to own one for a while and get to know it.

All this advice about other horns is well intended but I can understand the OP wanting to find a good Mark VI and decide for himself. If he finds a better horn later on he's unlikely to lose much, provided he buys sensibly.

I say go for it if you can.........
 

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you're still dealing with a very old instrument that is going to drain your wallet at every turn; ....shops jack up the price for everything associated with maintaining/repairing one, replacement clamp collars (neck receiver) and other parts are not available..
This just isn't true. A good tech can put a MKVI into perfect playing condition (assuming it hasn't been run over by a truck), and the VI is a very robust horn that will stay in good shape once it's been overhauled. It costs just as much to re-pad or do equivalent work on any other horn. In fact, I'd bet some techs would prefer working on a VI or other well-made horn, than a cheap, poorly built horn. Seems like the better-built horn should be less work to get into proper adjustment, etc. If you take even moderately good care of the horn, the only parts needing replacement are readily available (pads, corks, springs, etc).

I'm not saying the OP absolutely should get a VI, but if that's what he wants and if he has relatives who can afford to buy him one, I'd say go for it. Man, that horn brasscane has for sale would be 'case closed' if I was the OP. The thread title says $5-6k. So you there you have it.

Go back to Dr G's post, #26 for the link (I tried to copy it here, but it didn't work).

Disclaimer: I don't know brasscane and he's not giving me a commission or anything like that. But man, what a beautiful horn at a reasonable price (for a VI in such good condition)!
 

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Three things.

1. When I was looking for my tenor, I could have bought a Selmer Series II (the horn I anticipated getting) sight unseen. I chose to try a slew of horns down in DC. Had I bought a Series II, a few months later, upon trying a Yamaha EX at an event, I would have found that I regretted that decision.

2. I have a friend that plays tenor professionally. He plays a MkVI. When he was looking for a tenor, he tried no fewer than eight MkVIs, and disliked the first seven. He loved number eight, but he disliked seven. Some would call it a good thing for the player, but Selmers are not known for their consistency.

3. Closet horns might have wound up as such for a reason.

Moral of the story - try it before you buy it. Just because every moderately wealthy tenor sax player and his grandmother plays a MkVI, doesn't mean they're the best sax for you.
 

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This just isn't true. A good tech can put a MKVI into perfect playing condition (assuming it hasn't been run over by a truck), and the VI is a very robust horn that will stay in good shape once it's been overhauled. It costs just as much to re-pad or do equivalent work on any other horn. In fact, I'd bet some techs would prefer working on a VI or other well-made horn, than a cheap, poorly built horn. Seems like the better-built horn should be less work to get into proper adjustment, etc. If you take even moderately good care of the horn, the only parts needing replacement are readily available (pads, corks, springs, etc).

I'm not saying the OP absolutely should get a VI, but if that's what he wants and if he has relatives who can afford to buy him one, I'd say go for it. Man, that horn brasscane has for sale would be 'case closed' if I was the OP. The thread title says $5-6k. So you there you have it.

Go back to Dr G's post, #26 for the link (I tried to copy it here, but it didn't work).

Disclaimer: I don't know brasscane and he's not giving me a commission or anything like that. But man, what a beautiful horn at a reasonable price (for a VI in such good condition)!
This s how I got a player's MK VI. From my tech who took it from unplayable to 110% and charged me under $4k for it. It's possible, I know because I just did it.
 

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It's very possible to get a VI for about 4k-5k now a days in good shape ready to go. If you can get one in that range and have it overhauled then you will be in a good spot!!!

The last 2 VIs I bought for 3K a piece about a year ago. I just always cruise and look for good deals. When they pop up I get it and if I don't like it then I sell later. So just be patient. Although I still recommend trying everything you can get your hands on in the meantime. Good Luck.
 

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2. I have a friend that plays tenor professionally. He plays a MkVI. When he was looking for a tenor, he tried no fewer than eight MkVIs, and disliked the first seven. He loved number eight, but he disliked seven. Some would call it a good thing for the player, but Selmers are not known for their consistency.

3. Closet horns might have wound up as such for a reason.

Moral of the story - try it before you buy it. Just because every moderately wealthy tenor sax player and his grandmother plays a MkVI, doesn't mean they're the best sax for you.
There's a grain of truth here, especially the 'closet horn' comment. I often wonder why some old horns obviously weren't played much. But then it could just be the owner(s) thought they wanted to play, then got discouraged and put the horn away.

As to the guy who disliked 7 out of 8 VIs he tried, that could be down to a lot reasons. Maybe they weren't all in the best playing condition (very likely), or the room he played them in was different. Also, it can take time to adjust to any given horn. And we're all different in what we prefer. No doubt there is variation among VIs, though.

A lot of moderately poor sax players (myself included) bought their VIs back when a used one could be had for $1k or so. Only the more recent buyers need to be moderately wealthy to buy one without reaching deep in their pockets.
 

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Buy high, sell higher. That's how we do it.
Well considering I've played on it as my main horn for over a year, and I originally got it by trading straight up for my replated SBA I'd hardly call it "buy high, sell higher". The lacquer is in amazing condition, and the horn has had very little in the way of repairs, so I think 6000 is a fair asking price for 5 digit 1962/63 (I forget which year) era mark VI.

The reason I say "for sale again" is because I had it up, and decided to take it down while I'm waiting for my new horn to get it's overhaul.
 

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Buying a horn, or anything for that matter-with price as the determining criteria is too much of a compromise to end up with what one really wants. The MK VI tenor is a professional horn that requires commitment to work towards the skills this professional instrument demands. Price doesn't matter.
 

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You're right. That is a good price. Generally we see horns here over-priced and then slowly backed down. I'm guilty of it also. It's a buyers market now.
Thanks. That's the good thing about a market. It regulates itself generally. I feel like the Mark VI prices have been going down a bit, but I have a feeling prices will start going up again as the economy recovers...
 

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From my experience with buying anything high-dollar, cash talks, bull****e walks.
This is profound. I wouldn't hand over my horn to a talking head without cash.

I have a friend that plays tenor professionally. He plays a MkVI. When he was looking for a tenor, he tried no fewer than eight MkVIs, and disliked the first seven. He loved number eight, but he disliked seven. Some would call it a good thing for the player, but Selmers are not known for their consistency.
Whenever I hear this, I wonder what is so bad about the others that it cannot be remedied. I find it hard to believe. Obviously a larger fraction of the five digit horns have something special and the design changed, but still...

Thanks. That's the good thing about a market. It regulates itself generally. I feel like the Mark VI prices have been going down a bit, but I have a feeling prices will start going up again as the economy recovers...
That is Milton Freeman for saxes. Politics aren't allowed here.

Man, that horn brasscane has for sale would be 'case closed' if I was the OP. The thread title says $5-6k. So you there you have it!
Thank you. That was my thought too. Buy my sax and we can all move on to other threads.

Disclaimer: I don't know brasscane...
My mom would feel sorry for you. My so called friends would have you count your blessings.
 

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I just got a relaq 153k in my shop that is getting checked out by my tech now. It's going to get listed for slightly over 5000.00.

I'll list it here soon, but if you want first dibs, send me a PM, and I will get you pics.

Thanks!

Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk 2
 

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I've owned three VIs and ended up selling all of them. There is still that late model VI that I played in college that I wish I had but oh well. I almost bought a late 50s VI that was a great player when I was at House of Woodwinds on Oakland back in the 80s. Ended up picking a new Couf instead because it fit what I was looking for at the time. These days my gigging horn of choice is an 82Z. The key here is to play as many horns as possible and pick the one that speaks to you. That means it is easy to get the sound you hear in your head out the end of the horn and really just gets out of the way.
 
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