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Hi all,

I just purchased a Martin Handcraft Master (aka Typewriter) and have a slight mechanical issue with the G key octave mechanism.

This is gonna be somewhat difficult to describe without pictures, so bear with me.

When I depress the G key, a lever lifts up and allows an arm of the octave key to lift up, which in turn frees the secondary octave pad to open while preventing the neck octave pad from opening. Y'all know this, I'm sure.

Anyway, there is a little metal tab on the arm attached to the secondary octave pad that sits under the arm of the octave key. When the octave key is released with the G key depressed, the arm of the octave key presses down on that tab to close the secondary octave pad. I've noticed that there is cork under the arm that touches that tab.

The problem is, sometimes the friction between that cork and the tab prevents the secondary octave pad from closing. I've tried weakening the tension on the secondary octave pad spring that forces it open, and strengthening the tension on the octave key that would close the secondary octave pad, but that didn't help.

I took both rods off, cleaned the tubes and the pivot screws, re-oiled them, no luck. Finally got the idea to put a dab of key oil on the tab, which helped, but didn't fix the problem. I've considered putting a bit of teflon plumber's tape on the cork that touches the tab to keep the friction down, but I don't know if this will be a good permanent fix. Any advice?

Muchas gracias!
Jim
 

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wow....it is pretty difficult to describe the whole thing and I believe it sounds not unlike something that occasionally happens on my Committee RMC (the octave mechanism could be similar ). In the beginning I thought it was the spring of the upper octave vent which was lame but I noticed that it had something to do with my side octave vent mechanism which is catching in the action of the levers.

One of the two levers involved is covered with a thin strip of cork and the other one is supposed to slide on it but it doesn't do that without the occasional itch.

First I put some oil and then I put some silicone on the corky bit. It helps but there could and should be an inprovement which would work in a less primitive way.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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just put some cork grease on it--renew as needed
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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Give up using the cork. There are few places on a sax where natural cork is still an ideal material; the world has moved on.

You want to reduce friction. So glue Teflon sheet on one surface, and buff the other.
If the Teflon does not silence the action enough, then laminate high density felt (preferably Kraus's synthetic felt) under the Teflon.

If you can't do this, then get a technician to do it.

BTW, oil and grease are likely to release the glue that holds that cork on.
 

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probably something for next check up.....my tech is a great believer in good old fashioned cork and felt.....I will bring it up gently......technicians can be stubborn and moody, at times.....;) :)
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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He needs to progress from the 19th century! Several new materials are now well proven on instruments.
Cork is still the best IMO for tenon corks. But that is about all.
 

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I have exactly the same annoying little problem with my typewriter Alto and the side octave pip ('G key octave mechanism') and have tried similar adjustments to the springs. This forum is amazing - I search and I find.
 
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