Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,424 Posts
Soak the part that's fugal in hydrogen perxide until the mold is gone, then rinse and use or let dry. The peroxide will not hurt you since many use it for mouthwash.
I've found that some reeds flatten out when cleaned. Maybe the gunk warps them.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
38,789 Posts
hydrogen peroxyde is safe to use, if it doesn't work you could try something more energetic like diluted bleach (but you need to rinse the reeds very well), you need to mechanically remove the mould after cleaning. I also have used an ultrasonic cleaner after soaking in diluted bleach.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
Joined
·
7,398 Posts
I never recommend soaking a reed but I regularly wash my reeds with a toothbrush wet with regular drugstore hydrogen peroxide and have been for years. Every so often I'll take the clamps off my reedguards and wash them with it too. After washing, put them back in the reedguard and they'll be ready to play in a half hour or so. They also stay ready to play for about five or six hours as long as the reedguard is not exposed to dry or hot air and kept in the case or in a 'junk bag' (like a 'Crown Royal' purple felt bag - you can't be a serious sax player unless you have these). :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I find that hydrogen peroxide works well as said, but what really makes the difference is cleaning your reed guard. I have the Vandoren one and when I soak it in hydrogen peroxide, it looks like when a kid puts vinegar in the baking soda volcano.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,256 Posts
i had the brilliant idea to geta cigar humidor for my reeds.....nice pile of moldy reeds!!!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member/, Official SOTW Sister
Joined
·
19,200 Posts
Yuck....
Where do you live that you are getting so much moisture in your reeds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
I have used a cigar humidor for my reeds for years now, the trick is to charge your humidifier pads with propylene glycol the first time, and always use distilled water to recharge them. The propylene glycol doesn't evaporate, but changes the evaporation threshold of the distilled water so that you always maintain 70% relative humidity @ 72 degrees F. (relative humidity changes with temperature). The propylene glycol inhibits mold growth as well, so you never get mold starting in your humidor. Once it starts, it is a pain to stop. Vinegar is also a very effective mold killer, but cigar guys only use that to fix an already infested humidor (after throwing out all the moldy cigars).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
Call me a nut, but I once found mold on a few reeds (they were in storage for several years) and threw them away. The whole idea of trying to clean a few cane reeds that have such a relatively short life span to begin with didn't make much sense to me. I've since gone to synthetics and haven't had a need to buy a reed in a couple years now.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
I must be really nuts, then. I wash my reeds after I use them and then use a hairdryer to dry them off. No more dark moldy spots.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,287 Posts
It's really simple to avoid mould on reeds.

I just rinse the reed using tap water after playing and then let it dry out a fair bit like maybe an hour or so and then I put the reed back on to the mouthpiece which I also rinse after playing and it's all ready to play whenever.

I can use and have used a reed for months like this and get no mould at all.

Mould will happen when the reed is continually moist for long periods of time and not rinsing a reed will probably promote mould as well.

I flatten the back of my reeds using a sharp knife as well so that the reed sits flat on the mouthpiece table and if the reed warps a bit due to being wet and then drying out (especially for newer reeds) then I reflatten it and problem solved.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
Joined
·
7,398 Posts
Nothing should mildew in a humidor if the humidity is not excessive. If you're going to have a humidor, you may as well do it right and have at least a cheap temperature/humidity gauge you can get at Wal Mart. An alternative is the 'Humi-Pacs' that maintain the correct 60% humidity and can be recharged with water. I have several humidors since I got into good handmade cigars a few years ago. I recently stopped buying them by the box or bundle and now only have one occasionally, like if I have an outdoor gig and know I will have at least an hour downtime before the gig. Consequently, I put my humidors away except for one, in which I keep my repair cork. It stays properly humid with the rechargable Humi-Pacs. I also keep any new reeds in there until they get put into service, after which they remain in the reedguards in the cases. In my experience, if you drink only water or non-sugared beverages (including alcohol) before and during playing, you don't get mildew. It seems to thrive on sugars. Play and drink beer, put the reed away in the reedguard and it'll mildew. So, I have a lot of mildew :)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
How can you possibly get mold in Phoenix!!!!!!!!! I thought you needed moisture to grow mold! :mrgreen:
Ha! You would think. :)
Actually, there are times- April, May, June, September, even into October- when I'm running an evaporative (swamp) cooler, and there is alot of moister cold air in my home. This time of the year with the air-conditioner on, the reeds air dry within 15 to 30 minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Hydrogen peroxide also will extend the life of your reeds. I have been playing on the same 4 reeds for about 6 months now. Rotating the reeds on a daily basis. 2 reeds are Van 3 blue's and 2 are V16 3's. I like to play wet reeds so I soak the heel for about 15-20 mins in 50/50 then 5 min on the tip end, rinse with tap water then mount on MP. I like Legere classic cuts when playing outdoors or for concert band practice but I always find myself going back to my Van 3 blue's. Cane just feels like that good old pair of tennis shoes you can't throw away! I never have that many reeds open and use a Van 4 reed holder with the desicant tube in it. I keep un-opened or un-sealed reeds in regular wood cigar boxes I pick up from the package store they are very attractive and only cost me a dollar per box. This way I can keep my reeds separated, Soprano, Alto and Tenor.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,443 Posts
I never recommend soaking a reed but I regularly wash my reeds with a toothbrush wet with regular drugstore hydrogen peroxide and have been for years. Every so often I'll take the clamps off my reedguards and wash them with it too. After washing, put them back in the reedguard and they'll be ready to play in a half hour or so. They also stay ready to play for about five or six hours as long as the reedguard is not exposed to dry or hot air and kept in the case or in a 'junk bag' (like a 'Crown Royal' purple felt bag - you can't be a serious sax player unless you have these). :)
Are you using LaVoz/Rico reed guards? If so, I'd be interested in how you pry the clamps off. I've looked at them and fiddled with them but it sure looks like I will break them if not very, very careful. They are not real expensive but still, don't want to wantonly and unnecessarily break them. So far, I've just soaked them in some denatured alcohol or peroxide to periodically clean and perhaps sterilize them.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,927 Posts
Caution regarding hydrogen peroxide!

There is a lot of talk about hydrogen peroxide here. Please be careful to use dilute solutions - pure hydrogen peroxide (or "industrial grade") can cause some real damage to your mouth if you soak a reed in it then fail to adequately neutralize it before you use the reed.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top