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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been asked to play in my step-son's dubstep/drum-n-bass live band and I need to somehow mike my sax. Can anyone advise the best way of going about this. Is a floor mike that I point it into the simplest way? Or should I look at attached mikes or pickups? I know little of these things as I am an acoustic musician. We also talked about having radio mikes so I could walk around the stage.


This project means that I will have to upgrade from my old Conn stencil and I'm still undecided whether I should go for vintage (and presumably low Bb) or new(ish) and low A. I have read the threads and am still baffled! Is there really any difference in low Bb/low A or is the bigger difference between modern and vintage? I like the idea of vintage as the ones I've tried seem more solid and better built and have a warmer sound. But I am not an expert and need lots and lots of advice.

Please help!
 

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Miking a bari can be tricky. I've usually used a Shure 57 pointed down the bell; the results are adequate for my purposes. An attached mic is also going to be mounted on the bell and the results will probably be adequate as well. I don't know how it would be done in an actual studio situation but in videos of club dates, TV shows, and concerts you often see a mic stand and a guy playing the bari right into it.

I'd recommend you get one with a low A. A lot of people will say it makes the horn too heavy or ruins the sound. I don't buy that ... low A is pretty much expected in the arrangements I've come across lately. In most rock and blues settings the bari is mainly going to be working in the low register and being able to go down to a concert C is really useful.
 

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I tried using a shure 57 on a stand pointed into the bell as well, its the cheaper option but its a pain to have to stand still and make sure youre playing right into the mic. I'd definitely recommend the wireless mics I use a clip on shure 98h pointed down my bell with a line 6 XD-V70L. Its supposed to be for one of those clip on the shirt singing mics, but you can pretty much just throw that away and get a shure 98h or another instrument mic that will fit into its port. It works really well over a surprisingly large range and If you play in a city, you dont have to worry about finding a frequency that isn't being taken because its all digital. (its also a lot cheaper than the high-end non-digital models and works a lot better).
http://www.amazon.com/Line-XD-V70L-Wireless-Beltpack-Microphone/dp/B003OUX90Q

As far as the bari-sax itself goes, I agree with shotgun, get the low A, its something you'll be glad you have when it comes up in music, which is pretty often. If you're really in love with the vintage sound cannonball has some really nice, solid built unlacquered bari's, I use a raven myself but ive heard wonderful things about the brute and mad-meg unlacquered versions.

hope that helped
 

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I have been playing along with a friend who produces drum and bass and dubstep. One day in his studio we three mics around my old 12M bari
and got some interesting results from a mic right at the bottom of the sax where it bends. We have since played live
and I just put a dodgy old vintage mic thru a delay pedal but positioned it across the low and mid tone holes where my right hand is for
some of the session as it seems to pick up some good sound there. I'm sure having one near the bell would be great in combination with this.
Not highly technical or flash with my old Bb bari but totally fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. I am on a trip to sax.co.uk today to check out their baris and mikes. I have started another thread as its a slightly different topic (I hope that's ok) MisterH - its nice to hear from a kiwi! We were over in NZ last year and its the best country in the world. Loved it to pieces (I didn't want to leave!)
 

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I use an AKG 419 clip on. Works awesome from my curved soprano to my Bari (and I have recordings to prove it! But the files are huge!).
 

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I am by no means an audio engineer, pretty much just trial and error. I have used a Shure 57 with good results. Currently, I'm using an Audix D4 to mic my bari. It is designed for floor toms, but seems to work well. What does not work well is my AMT Roam 4 wireless rig. Fine for Tenor, but lacking the low end I need for bari.
 

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You have a bari now so why "upgrade"?

I would borrow or let the group provide you with any kind of mic (they've got to have extras) for now. Basically I'm saying do not put any money into this until you see it working out, step back and relax a bit and just play with them for a while first.

JR
 

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Old thread revived. I had an interesting experience at a gig in December. The band's drummer was letting me know he could not hear the bari even with being miced with a Shure 57. He handed me an AKG bass drum mic that he had and I used it. I only heard myself through the monitors, but it seemed to work very well for getting that bari sound that everyone expects at an R&B gig without working very hard.
 

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Same issues several years ago. My review of bari mic options for live stage use (non-clip-on) narrowed down to the Sennheiser 421 and the EV RE20. I replaced my Shure 57 with a 421 for our 12 piece show band with a loud 5 person rhythm section and 6 screaming horns. After the switch, the audience had no trouble hearing the bari- low A's and all....
 
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