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Yesterday it was working just fine and in tune. Now when i do the open C# it sounds like Im slightly bending the note up, I have no idea what is happening. Same problem with it with the octave key.
 

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Above the B pad, there is a small pad which is open on C# and closes below C. This pad is operated by a bar linking to B and C; this bar should contact the body via a cork or a felt which limits the opening of the small pad. This cork/felt is now probably missing.
 

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Above the B pad, there is a small pad which is open on C# and closes below C. This pad is operated by a bar linking to B and C; this bar should contact the body via a cork or a felt which limits the opening of the small pad. This cork/felt is now probably missing.
You’re right, do I have to bring it to a tech or can I fix it myself
 

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You’re right, do I have to bring it to a tech or can I fix it myself
If you can find the missing cork/felt in the case and if you can see the place where it was glued on the bar, it is a quite easy fix.
Else, you will have to figure out the right thickness: glue a too thick cork and sand it (testing from time to time) until the intonation is correct. It's not a very difficult repair but you may prefer to have a tech do it.

Hey, it's my post #1000!
 

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If you can find the missing cork/felt in the case and if you can see the place where it was glued on the bar, it is a quite easy fix.
Else, you will have to figure out the right thickness: glue a too thick cork and sand it (testing from time to time) until the intonation is correct. It's not a very difficult repair but you may prefer to have a tech do it.

Hey, it's my post #1000!
Thanks! Also congrats on 1000 posts lol
 

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The small tonehole above the B is called the C. It is correct that it is open on the note C#. The keycup that closes it is attached to the "back bar" which sits on top of the key foot of the B and the A keys. If both of these key feet have lost their "foot corks" that contact the body of the sax, it would allow the C to be higher than normal, but the B and A keycups would be higher than normal as well. The middle C# which vents first through the C tonehole is typically a flat note on most saxophones. It is possible that a leak above this tonehole in one of the palm keys could be causing the pitch to be unstable, but that is something I have never experienced so it is just an educated guess.
 

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The small tonehole above the B is called the C. It is correct that it is open on the note C#. The keycup that closes it is attached to the "back bar" which sits on top of the key foot of the B and the A keys. If both of these key feet have lost their "foot corks" that contact the body of the sax, it would allow the C to be higher than normal, but the B and A keycups would be higher than normal as well. The middle C# which vents first through the C tonehole is typically a flat note on most saxophones. It is possible that a leak above this tonehole in one of the palm keys could be causing the pitch to be unstable, but that is something I have never experienced so it is just an educated guess.
"C tone hole" may be ambiguous (especially when the "A" key is labelled C, as I did in post #2 -apologies...). Stephen Howard calls Aux B this tone hole/pad (and Aux F its brother on the lower stack).
You are correct (I didn't check and my memory was incorrect): the back bar doesn't have its own key foot (which would be a possible cause of double action) and the opening of this "C" pad is only limited by the contact of the back bar with the top of the feet of the B and A keys.
A leak in a palm key would cause more severe problems, as far as I know... your other explanation (both B and A have lost the cork on their key foot) sounds more likely. The OP may not have noticed the strange height of these keys, and may also not have noticed the double action if one of the corks fell some time ago and the other one more recently.
Finally, if this explanation (missing corks on the key feet) is correct and if the OP wants to replace the corks himself, the intonation in both octaves must be checked, because the tuning is a compromise: middle C# is slightly flat and high C# is sligthly sharp.
 

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To save ambiguity, "the pad (or tone holee) under the small C key". :)
Some pedants get hung up (quite correctly) on labelling tone holes with their correct names rather than keys. But for players, the reference items are the keys.
Without getting bogged down...
Some key is not closing correctly, or a key is closing before another one that it operates, for whatever reason - missing cork, bent part, jammed pivot, etc.
If the OP cannot work out which, and work out how to improvise to deal with it (perhaps by using layers of tape), then it is a job for a technician. :)
 
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