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Discussion Starter #1
Now ive got a Kohlert VKS tenor with the microtuner

which way,and for what purposes do you keep yours at ,as neutral position

do you keep it out,so that you have headroom to push sharp if needed ?

do you stay in, staying on the sharp side,so you can have room to move down?

do you keep it in the middle???


also for what applications do you apply your philosophy??? f.e. playing lead alto...solo as opposed to section playing...etc.

thanx!!!!

also whats up with this tiny cork???? i can hardly get a mouthpiece to fit properly because the cork is so short...and very exaggeratedly sloped so that the only place my mouthpieces seal,is all the way at the base.
 

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I understood that the best way to use a microtuner is to set it as short as possible and then to push the mouthpiece all the way in until you touch the metal of the microtuner, then you regulate the pitch by turning out the microtuner consequently making it longer to the length which you need to achieve for exact tuning. This can be a problem if the shank of your mouthpiece is long to start with since the mouthpieces of the microtune era were mostly short shanks.
 

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I actually use it a bit differently. For large chamber pieces (including those of the era) I do just as Milandro described. I've found though, that the high end intonation can be tinkered with for modern high baffle/ small chamber pieces by only partially pushing the mouthpiece on and then shortening the tuning portion- effectively enlarging the chamber (or at least the chamber to neck opening volume).

This meant, for me, that virtually any mouthpiece I have "works" with the horn. I have not run in to the "too long a shank" issue on alto's but did have that problem when using tenor pieces on a tuning neck C-Melody.

Easy to do, costs nothing; give it a try.
 

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I have a Conn alto twith microtuner and the cork is about the same length as any other cork. I like to be able to just keep the piece on all the way, my understanding is that this gets the best sound out of the mouthpiece - I don't think that would be the case in every situation, but, I think it works for me. Plus, that way I know that 99% of the time if I am out of tune then I am playing sharp. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
...very interesting ive found that if the microtuner is set ALL the way in one direction or other,that the horn responds better..... there is no way someone can tell me on this one that my oral cavity is resonating differently,or some such explanation.... it really resonates better when the metal is touching metal
 

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you can of course hear what you like, who am I to tell you differently (?), but there is nothing to resonate anywhere on or in an neck if not in your head (literally) . The way that the microtuner was intended to be used however is with the mouthpiece touching the metal and starting from the least extended position gradually extend the microtuner by turning until you reach the tuning.......but even then if you want to use it differently, be my guest :bluewink:
 

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...very interesting ive found that if the microtuner is set ALL the way in one direction or other,that the horn responds better..... there is no way someone can tell me on this one that my oral cavity is resonating differently,or some such explanation.... it really resonates better when the metal is touching metal
Hmmmm...a microtuner is a helicoid spiral, much like the focusing system of a manual-focus lens. There are stops at the ends of the helix but it is never like it tightens down...so whatever you are experiencing has nothing to do with metal touching metal and "resonating better".
 

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I actually use it a bit differently. For large chamber pieces (including those of the era) I do just as Milandro described. I've found though, that the high end intonation can be tinkered with for modern high baffle/ small chamber pieces by only partially pushing the mouthpiece on and then shortening the tuning portion- effectively enlarging the chamber (or at least the chamber to neck opening volume).

This meant, for me, that virtually any mouthpiece I have "works" with the horn. I have not run in to the "too long a shank" issue on alto's but did have that problem when using tenor pieces on a tuning neck C-Melody.

Easy to do, costs nothing; give it a try.
Absolutely--you should definitely be able to change the intonational relationships of the modes by changing the mpc position on the cork and compensating the change with microtuner extension, because this effectively changes chamber volume.
 

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Hmmmm...a microtuner is a helicoid spiral, much like the focusing system of a manual-focus lens. There are stops at the ends of the helix but it is never like it tightens down...so whatever you are experiencing has nothing to do with metal touching metal and "resonating better".
Impressive term for a threaded sleeve over a cylinder! While I agree that it seems unlikely that the metal to metal effect has a measurable effect on the sound, there is clearly increased rigidity in the system brought on by metal to metal contact at the extremes of adjustment. It's exactly the same effect as encountered with a nut on a bolt. Midway down the bolt the nut may be fairly stable- as in an unworn tuning neck mechanism (also damped by the moving sleeve within the neck proper and the grease presumably present in a decently maintained microtuner)- but when jammed up against the head of the bolt there is a very rigid contact. Just so with the microtuner at its extremes.

ADDENDUM: Having lumbered over to my old neck box and pulled out a microtuner:
-the "jam nut effect" only occurs when the tuner is screwed all the way in. Turned in the other direction it, of course, falls off in your hand.
-the rigidity involved affects the external turning sleeve, but the actual corked sliding cylinder is no more or less rigid- it is not affected by the rigidity of the external sleeve to neck contact.
-Were I not a complete jerk I'd now apologise to K for my overly hasty reponse; but why change now!
 

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... The way that the microtuner was intended to be used however is with the mouthpiece touching the metal and starting from the least extended position gradually extend the microtuner by turning until you reach the tuning.......but even then if you want to use it differently, be my guest :bluewink:

There's "how it was designed to be used" and adjustments by players to deliberately disregard the considered judgment of the engineers who designed the system and then complain that it doesn't work well!
v/r
An Adjusting Player
 

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There's "how it was designed to be used" and adjustments by players to deliberately disregard the considered judgment of the engineers who designed the system and then complain that it doesn't work well!
v/r
An Adjusting Player
outstanding piece of free thinking :)
 

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It makes sense that there could be a different way to maximize the use for high baffled pieces as there weren't, to my knowledge, "high baffled" (read: wedge) pieces in the 30's when the microtuner was in vogue.
 
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