Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need to record my alto sax in a home studio with a band.
So many options for microphones out there, and i have not any significant excperience with microphones...

Any sugestions for a mic that does not cost me more than 200 euro ?

thanks in advance,
keep the music going!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,328 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Are you looking at USB mics? If you're recording into a computer (e.g. using Audacity), then a good option is the Blue Microphones Yeti.

I picked one up for about CAD$100, so should be well within budget. It's a USB mic, so would suit recording on computer well and has a few different modes for recording as a group/stereo/mono etc.

If you're going into a mixing desk or something else then ignore this completely :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,470 Posts
There's not any new condenser mics that I can recommend in that price range. If you want to look at used mics, you can find Audio-Technica AT 3035s on Ebay for about $100-120 USD. A pair of those would be a great start for a home studio (make sure they have the shock mount and carry bag included)

In dynamic mics, I would recommend the Heil PR22 and PR30 if you can stretch your budget just a bit. The PR22 is about $110. The PR30 is about $240-250ish. Both really great mics. Other than that, you can't go wrong picking up a Shure SM57. But I think the Heils sound better and will work equally well for vocals and instruments. The Heils will work equally well for home recording and as a live mic if you need it on a gig.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
29,164 Posts
I would agree about the Blue Yeti USB, ideal if you don't already have a decent mic preamp and Analog/Digital converters.

If you already have those (either standalone or part of a desk) then a a decent dynamic as mentioned, PR22 or SM57 (also more useful for stage mic than a condenser)
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
29,164 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
Joined
·
7,356 Posts
Unless it has USB input
That hadn't occurred to me. Every mixing board I've seen with a USB in, the USB isn't a channel. It's like an MP3 player or something similar.

What company makes a board that looks like a regular console but has usb inputs?

USB out for recording is very common. But the channels are XLR or 1/4 inch
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
Joined
·
7,356 Posts
Ah, that really sucks Darrell.

Well, depending on how much a new interface is going to cost, you could open up to getting zoom.

I see audio interfaces going all the time locally here. I used an M-Audio fast track with Windows 10 and Audacity and it worked very well, no issues. I bet you could find one for around $50 (they don't make em anymore though).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,470 Posts
Unless it has USB input
Can you name a single sound console that has USB inputs for microphones?

There are none that I am aware of. Digital consoles that have a USB port all use them for file storage and recording/playback of mp3s or wav files.

To everyone suggesting the SM57/SM58, I implore you to try a Heil PR22. For about $20 more you get a mic that sound 10 times better than those old stuffy 57/58s.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
29,164 Posts
Can you name a single sound console that has USB inputs for microphones?

There are none that I am aware of..
Nor me, I can't imagine there is much call. For home recording most people who are multimicing would be using either a digital interface and mixing within a DAW. I can't see much point these days in using an analogue mixing desk with stereo mix USB output in this situation unless you really have to.

I have no idea what problems may arise if you combine recording with a USB mic along with a digital interface, it's something I've been meaning to test using a blue Yeti along with my Apogee thunderbolt all into Logic. I suspect it's not even possible to choose two unrelated input devices.

Anyway, I digress from the topic, sorry about that it won't happen again...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Hello All,

This appears to be a similar thread to the question I was going to ask so I thought I'd reopen the thread as opposed to starting anew. I'm trying to record at home using a USB input on my computer for the purpose of video based learning. I was totally unhappy with the microphone built into the computer so I went on a hunt for a new budget microphone that would suit my purpose. Seriously considered the USB Blue Yeti Pro but it was more expensive than two competitors with good reviews: The AT2020 USB+ and the Rode NT-USB. I opted for the NT-USB. After playing with it for a day it is giving me some headaches! Records well using audacity but that doesn't work for my purposes of video based lessons. When trying to create a video I experimented a bit and found that holding one note at a relatively even volume and pitch caused the recording to have issues (muted recording and fluctuations).

So, I need help or advice from someone knowledgeable! I'm considering returning the microphone and going to an audio interface such as the Focusrite scarlett and more traditional microphone or if anyone can recommend a better audio/video app compatible with Windows 10? I understand that Windows 10 has been a source of issues in the past, any thoughts?

Thank you,
Brian
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
297 Posts
hi levagel,
i read this comparison test from steve neff http://www.neffmusic.com/blog/2014/09/saxophone-microphone-review-and-audio-shootout-part-2/
then i talked to an audio engineer and after that i bought the beyerdynamim m 201 for 100€ on ebay (new about 200€).
It's a great allround sax mic for live and recording.
For studio only the nohype mics get great reviews: https://www.nohypeaudio.com/lineaudioproducts.htm
i can second the suggestion on the nohype ribbon mic!........bought one a year ago and its a good product!
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
29,164 Posts
i can second the suggestion on the nohype ribbon mic!........bought one a year ago and its a good product!
It's good but I'd be wary of using any ribbon mic without a good live room, so I wouldn't recommend for most home recording.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
29,164 Posts
So, I need help or advice from someone knowledgeable! I'm considering returning the microphone and going to an audio interface such as the Focusrite scarlett and more traditional microphone or if anyone can recommend a better audio/video app compatible with Windows 10? I understand that Windows 10 has been a source of issues in the past, any thoughts?
So what was your problem with the Blue Yeti, it seems to me that would be ideal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
No problem just couldn't see the difference and the price on the Rode, which also came recommended, was less. Further, it came with a "pop screen" which seemed like a slight upgrade. The Blue Yeti Pro has the multiple patterns and after reading some of your thoughts it seemed a step above and $100 more expensive. I was simply trying to get a mic that suited my needs at the most affordable price with the thought that there would be plenty of time to upgrade if I was utilizing the microphone regularly and continued doing so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Further, being an entire novice to recording I can't discern if it is the microphone, the room or the a/v application. I'm pretty lost to be honest. Could even be me but I asked a non-biased person (significant other) and she said it wasn't an accurate reproduction of what I sound like to her either. Information on recording saxophones is very limited. Mr. Thomas, you produced about the only information I found. Most of the comparisons etc... were talking about audio recording only using either Reaper or Audacity. With my need of using a video with audio for the lessons I was on my own at that point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,904 Posts
If you want to digitally record yourself in a room (not a real studio), and have it sound any good, you need 3 things.

1) Decent software (bbillings, this may be your problem - most people I know who record videos use Audacity or a DAW to record the audio, then mix it with the video - or use a standalone recorder/camera, of which good ones are quite expensive).
2) A good mike stand.
3) A curtain, or an open clothes closet, or a large piece of foam on a music stand, behind the mic. (Or spend money on one of those mike stand absorber things...)

Then stand 3-4 feet away (about a meter) and play. Almost any condenser mic will sound very similar to what you sound like if you do this. You have to watch your recorded levels, make sure they are hot enough but not too hot, and everything will be fine. If you stand very close to the mic, most condenser mics will be so bright sounding that they will be harsh, and maybe even distorted (saxophones are LOUD). Dynamics, like the Shure and Heil ones described do better close up, but this method still works with them.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top