Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a microphone that I would like to have the fixed cable shortened and have the XLR connector changed to a right angle XLR connector. Does anyone know who could do this? Are there typically local shops that could do this type of work?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,769 Posts
I have a microphone that I would like to have the fixed cable shortened and have the XLR connector changed to a right angle XLR connector. Does anyone know who could do this? Are there typically local shops that could do this type of work?
Do you know anyone who knows how to solder properly? Friends, perhaps? What kind of microphone has a cable permanently attached?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,944 Posts
I have a microphone that I would like to have the fixed cable shortened and have the XLR connector changed to a right angle XLR connector. Does anyone know who could do this? Are there typically local shops that could do this type of work?
An alternative is to find (or make) a new cable with the desired connector and swap it out at the microphone.

If you can solder at all, these are really easy to do. Take photos, or make a diagram, of the conductor colors before you take it apart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
My old long electroVoice has the shielded cable wires soldered on. The cable is rotten and needs replaced. But I don't know if this old style has the same quality as the new mics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,441 Posts
I have a microphone that I would like to have the fixed cable shortened and have the XLR connector changed to a right angle XLR connector. Does anyone know who could do this? Are there typically local shops that could do this type of work?
This is an easy fix and entails about $6 worth of parts for the right angle XLR-M connector. It's not hard and should only take about $15 minutes including the time it takes for the soldering iron to heat up. Any sound tech worth their salt should be able to do this. If you find a sound tech who doesn't know how to solder a cable end, don't ever hire them because they probably don't know anything else.

But, why do you want the right angle connector on the male end of the cable? That's the end that usually plugs into the console or sub snake and having a right angle connector there would make patching more difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,441 Posts
My old long electroVoice has the shielded cable wires soldered on. The cable is rotten and needs replaced. But I don't know if this old style has the same quality as the new mics.
Some of those older vintage mics used different connector types and non standard (compared to what we use now) wiring schemes. It's probably easy to build a new cable for it, would just need to find the right connector and a wiring diagram to be sure everything is connected properly. What model mic is it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
This is an easy fix and entails about $6 worth of parts for the right angle XLR-M connector. It's not hard and should only take about $15 minutes including the time it takes for the soldering iron to heat up. Any sound tech worth their salt should be able to do this. If you find a sound tech who doesn't know how to solder a cable end, don't ever hire them because they probably don't know anything else.

But, why do you want the right angle connector on the male end of the cable? That's the end that usually plugs into the console or sub snake and having a right angle connector there would make patching more difficult.
I would use a right angle connector because I am using the mic with a bodypack and it is a lot to have a 6" XLR connector sticking out of the side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,441 Posts
I would use a right angle connector because I am using the mic with a bodypack and it is a lot to have a 6" XLR connector sticking out of the side.
Ok, what model of microphone are you talking about exactly? Is it a mini clip on mic? Those are much harder to work on because they are much smaller and the wires are much more delicate. Those connectors are also much more expensive. And cutting the cable for one of those mics means that you are left with only that shortened length and it can't be extended. Not the best idea if you ever need to use it in a different configuration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,471 Posts
Ok, what model of microphone are you talking about exactly? Is it a mini clip on mic? Those are much harder to work on because they are much smaller and the wires are much more delicate. Those connectors are also much more expensive. And cutting the cable for one of those mics means that you are left with only that shortened length and it can't be extended. Not the best idea if you ever need to use it in a different configuration.
Well, he said he had an XLR connector on there now so I would assume that means a regular old XLR. In which case someone was able to solder the pins of the existing connector to the existing wires; so someone should be able to solder the same wires to a new connector.

Wouldn't any electric guitar repair person be able to do this? I mean, they work with those little hair like wires in pickups. Another choice would be a stereo repair tech (large cities may still have these; I know where there's one near-ish me).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,441 Posts
Wouldn't any electric guitar repair person be able to do this?
Not from the work that I have seen.

The wires on guitar pickups are nowhere near as tiny as the wires on some of these mini mic connectors. I'm assuming it's probably a TA4M connector, which aren't too bad to work on. If it's a Lemo or Microdot connector, forget about it. Just send it back to the manufacturer and tell them what you want done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Ok, what model of microphone are you talking about exactly? Is it a mini clip on mic? Those are much harder to work on because they are much smaller and the wires are much more delicate. Those connectors are also much more expensive. And cutting the cable for one of those mics means that you are left with only that shortened length and it can't be extended. Not the best idea if you ever need to use it in a different configuration.
It is an AKG C747
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
So I use the mic through a Zeppelin Labs Espresso Portable Phantom Power Supply and then through a wireless transmitter. The mic sounds very nice on sax. I have used it live on multiple occasions and have never had issues with feedback or unwanted coloration of the sound. There are just a few quirks with this setup. The first being the design of the AKG C747 have a fixed straight XLR out. The second is that the phantom power supply has some self noise to it. I have a second phantom power supply, an ART Phantom II Pro, but with the arrangement of the in and out ports, I would definitely need right angle XLR connector.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Also, if anyone has any better alternatives for the phantom power supply, I would love to hear them. I looked into a system from Lectrosonics but those are very costly.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top