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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want my students to upgrade their mouthpieces from their yamahas or s80s to a versatile mouthpiece like a meyer. Considering control quality and finishing, what would you recommend to your students? I am inclined toward the Vandoren V16 or D'addario Select Jazz or something like that that seems to be better finished.
What would you do?
We have to just order online and are not able to try the mouthpiece before buying.
 

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What do you mean by "to a versatile mouthpiece?" I really like the s80 because of it's versatility. I love the meyer as well, but I wouldn't call it versatile. I think it depends more on the material that you are studying with said students. If they're into classical, or a little bit of everything, the s80 should suit them well. If they're primarily focused on jazz I'd strongly recommend the meyer as a first piece. I'd definitely continue recommending the s80, because as far as versatility goes, it's a very well playing piece.
 

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I want my students to upgrade their mouthpieces from their yamahas or s80s to a versatile mouthpiece like a meyer. Considering control quality and finishing, what would you recommend to your students? I am inclined toward the Vandoren V16 or D'addario Select Jazz or something like that that seems to be better finished.
What would you do?
We have to just order online and are not able to try the mouthpiece before buying.
I dont like Meyer tenor pieces. I like Meyer alto pieces. I like Vandoren and Daddario but only have experience in tenor with them. However I think they are a better piece than Meyer.
 

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IMO a Selmer C* for classical work and a Vandoren V16 for jazz is a great basic place to start.

If they're not doing actual classical repetoire and just doing something like concert band, the V16 will be fine for both.

- Saxaholic
 

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I am in the minority liking Meyers for both alto and tenor. I agree that the S-80 is more versatile than the Meyer. The Yamaha might be the better choice. My S80 is a D and I find it less stuffy than a C*. I have used a D since the short shank days......about 50+years.
 

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I strongly reccomend the Retro Revival New York Meyer. They are even on sale. I've tried a lot of alto pieces and these play really well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the answers.
Some of them are just on 2nd or third year, and some are adults who play in a little concert band with arrangements of popular music.
No classical music. One of them would play with some friends in a more rock oriented group.
What i am afraid of with meyers is the finishing work quality.

Maybe i was wrong using the word "upgrade", the S80 is a nice piece, but they are not onto classical and i think they would benefit more from something different.
 

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Regarding alto, I think the smaller tip sizes of a Vandoren V16M, a D'Addario Select Jazz or a JodyJazz HR* are indeed versatile enough to do the trick quite nicely in a concert band setting, but so may be a more open S80, depending on reed choice. While in the same ballpark, modern Babbitt Meyers are known to be more inconsistent, so try before buying, if possible. Allegedly, the new NY Meyer edition is better finished, but also more expensive. Regarding tenor, the same applies (except there is no New NY Meyer), but also consider the New Vintage Otto Link Tone Edge. I think those are more popular than Meyers on tenor.
 

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Regarding alto, I think the smaller tip sizes of a Vandoren V16M, a D'Addario Select Jazz or a JodyJazz HR* are indeed versatile enough to do the trick quite nicely in a concert band setting, but so may be a more open S80, depending on reed choice. While in the same ballpark, modern Babbitt Meyers are known to be more inconsistent, so try before buying, if possible. Allegedly, the new NY Meyer edition is better finished, but also more expensive. Regarding tenor, the same applies (except there is no New NY Meyer), but also consider the New Vintage Otto Link Tone Edge. I think those are more popular than Meyers on tenor.

I think this is very close to my feeling about the issue. I think I’m pretty much that level of player. I bought a Mayer 5M and a Vandoren V16 M5 to see how I like them. The Mayer was easy to blow, but kind of too bright for my taste, so I gave it to my grandson. There is something to the Vandoren that I like but, after every round with it, I find myself go to my Jody Jazz HR* 6 that I bought when I was balancing between the Mayer and Vandoren. I like the little darker sound and the feeling of openness. To my understanding they are also well built and play tested. Unfortunately I haven’t tried the D’Addario Select Jazz, but they should be very even in quality. So, yes, I would go with the Jody even if it is a bit more expensive.
 

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I little addition to that. I play an SML Strasser-Marigaux alto, which is probably from the brighter end of altos. So the Mayers and Vandorens may be a better fit for “softer” horns. I guess the horn type should be taken in account as well.
 

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I little addition to that. I play an SML Strasser-Marigaux alto, which is probably from the brighter end of altos. So the Mayers and Vandorens may be a better fit for “softer” horns. I guess the horn type should be taken in account as well.
You can surely do that, but I'd argue that would be overthinking the issue at that stage. After all, it is possible to use different reed cuts to (ceteris paribus) account for undesired tone qualities, e.g. use Vandoren Blue instead of Javas if you think you sound too bright on a Meyer 5M.
 

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Beginners? The S80 C* is fine mouthpiece for students in most applications at that stage of their playing. If that's what they have, then that should be sufficient. They need to work on their sound and fundamentals, not play mouthpiece roulette.
 

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Also I'd consider the "new Soloist" from Selmer. The limited experience I"ve had with recent production Selmer mouthpieces implies pretty good quality control (unlike what we hear about Babbitt the manufacturer of Meyer). In a more open facing (say D or E) I think it would be a reasonable substitute for a good Meyer, a bit less projecting but certainly capable of substantial sound output with practice. (I have been known to play lead alto in a less-noisy big band on my Soloist C*, and I often use it for small group work.) It's my understanding though not confirmed by experience that the current production "new Soloist" is very close to the "old Soloist" that was included with every Mark 6 Selmer. It is not the same design as a S-80 or S-90.
 

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I agree you could also consider a Selmer Soloist. They are a bit more expensive, though.

Theo Wanne explains the resemblance to the older model(s) in a bit more detail on this website:
Selmer reissued the popular Soloist mouthpieces [in 2002]. They are a fairly accurate copy of the ‘Soloist Style’ vintage more so than the older version that said ‘Soloist’ on the table.
And on those 1960s 'Soloist style' models:
These mouthpieces externally look similar to the long shank Soloists, but did not have Soloist engraved on the table. The tip opening was also stamped on the back. They still had the horseshoe shaped chamber. They had less roll-over baffle than their Soloist brothers [from the 1950s and earlier 1960s] though, so were darker sounding.
 

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Many players who like a Meyer on alto try the same size on tenor and do not like it. If you like a 6M on alto, you need to try a 9M on tenor to get an equivalent tip opening.

Many stores do not know this and have 6M tenors sitting around that are not selling.
 

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Many players who like a Meyer on alto try the same size on tenor and do not like it. If you like a 6M on alto, you need to try a 9M on tenor to get an equivalent tip opening.

Many stores do not know this and have 6M tenors sitting around that are not selling.
I think the shift is a bit less than that, but it'll be personal. For me a #7 feels about right on alto and a #8 feels about right on tenor. For me personally I would say a #6 alto and #8 tenor would be about even in "degree of openness".
 

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I dont understand what is wrong with a decent condition Yamaha 4C in the first place if they are beginners?

Why inflict more expense on them and set them down the road of thinking that swapping mouthpieces is somehow going to be a magic tonal bullet?

We all eventually gravitate towards a mouthpiece that works for us, but I wouldnt presume to dictate that what I like is going to work for someone else, thats a choice that each player needs to make themselves. If they are beginners first they need to learn to play, and then later they need to figure out what works best for them. The best you can do is help them learn how to determine that, and maybe make some suggestions as to what brands / models might work for different musical ideals. they will then have to figure out what facing works best for them, not everyone plays a 6 after all.

I can see if you are competing with a band and you are trying to blend tones and someone has an obnoxious dukoff with a step baffle you might want to push them in a different direction, but if they are on a 4C or have already invested a significant amount in an S80 I dont see the point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well,
my point is that i prefer to have them working on a piece that could serve them well for years since the beginning. Almost all of them are adults so they can expend the money, anyway i just suggest them to move, they are not forced. The yamaha is not bad, but for me the meyer for example is warmer and projects better. Two of them have s80´s and play in concert band, popular music, and i think they would be better on a meyer, or meyerlike piece.
If i could i would have them all buying a yamaha sax since the first day, not a chinese sax, like the ones two of them use.
They are beginners, but they have 2-3 years of playing behind.
 
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