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Discussion Starter #1
I recently acquired a Meyer bros mouthpiece. It is an original 6m. Being eager to try it out, I shoved it into my sax. What I immediately noticed is that it is super tight on the neck... This has happened once with other mouthpiece that I tried, which was an alto otto link florida metal mouthpiece. Is this supposed to be this tight?? Compared to more modern mouthpieces, or even Meyer NY USA, it is just way too tight...Good news is that it is a solid player, with a thick and vibrant sound.

Oh. and can the shank become cracked even if it is a hard rubber? Thanks
 

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Mouthpieces vary a bit so sand the cork..Hard Rubber may crack so it is better to replace a $5 cork than a valuable mouthpiece.
 

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yup, another +1 for the above... HR pieces can crack at the shank, and it's much easier to sand the cork down.

One small word to the wise - you may want to add a bit of masking tape around the area directly behind your neck cork before sanding to protect the finish of the sax neck while you sand the neck cork. It may look easy, but it's easy to slip or just accidentally have the sandpaper come into contact with the finish of the sax neck while you're sanding it which will scratch it. So, I'd add a little masking tape unless the finish is already messed up or not worth worrying about...
 

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Good advice on the masking tape. Get some black emery cloth at the hardware store and cut it in 1" strips, rotate around the cork to get it even. Go slowly as you need the cork to still be tight before greasing whcih will loosen it a great deal.Do a small amount at a time checking by putting the mouthpiece on. Once it seems just a small amount of snugness, grease up the cork and try it. If it is still to tight, clean the cork with alcohol and sand again.
 

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Dont put that piece on again until you sand the cork. You risk ending up with an expensive paperweight! This variance is normal and different designs have different bores at the end. Keep in mind that hard rubber pieces are cooled from molds. There will always be different rates of shrinking due to a large number of variables. Its just one of those annoyance we have to live with.
 

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I've had the same problem with all of my newer Meyer pieces (alto and soprano). I didn't have that problem with an earlier Meyer I owned. The older one fit pretty much the same as my Selmer pieces. Unfortunately, I loaned that Meyer to a student and never got it back. Funny how people can disappear from the face of the earth after borrowing things.

Unfortunately again...I had to sand my neck corks down so much to get the newer Meyers to fit that my Selmers no longer fit without adding some teflon tape around the cork when I want to use those. That works, but it's a pain since I do go back and forth between mouthpieces. I still really like my Selmer pieces for classical playing.

I've thought about having the shanks of my Meyers bored out to match the size of my Selmer pieces. Has anyone ever done that? Any thoughts...pros - cons? Any idea about how much it would cost to do that?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Than you for the input guys! I shaved down my cork, and now it goes in a lot easier. Should've done that sooner!
CooolJazzz, I thought about enlarging the bore as well, but didn't go ahead because that would lower the value of the mpc if it is a vintage one.
Enlarging the bore shouldn't cost much since it is an easy modification.
 
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