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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I'm sure a lot has been written or discussed about these mouthpieces in this section, but it would be very helpful if you could provide information and/or links to pics.
At Theo's page, I got this information:

Meyer Bros: quite thick, rounded walls
Meyer NY early model: thinner walls, but still rounded
Meyer NY later model: even thinner than early model, walls not rounded anymore

Is this basically correct? I would love to have a link to pics that compare theses mouthpieces. Can you really discriminate an earlier NY model from a later one by looking at the chamber and the inner walls?
I guess there is a tendency like this: the thicker wall and round walls of the Bros provide a "fatter" tone than the early NY series, and the later NY series has, generally spoken, a thinner tone. Is this right?

Thanks for your help and information, I appreciate it.
 

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I dont want to start a debate here about materials but the thickness of the wall is primarily inconsequential to the tone of the piece. Its thicker or thinner primarily in relation to keeping the outer dimensions consistent between models and changing chamber shape and size. If a piece is thinner sounding it is likely because of how well the design was executed. While the vintage pieces probably got more individualized attention there are still a slew of them that really dont sound and play all that hot. The difference between the Meyer Bros. and the Ny is chamber and baffle size. NY Meyers are, on the hole, brighter and have more baffle than their earlier counterparts. I would not call any well done Meyer thin. If its thin and anemic it has a problem.

Hope that makes helps a little and makes sense.
 

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What Phil said about wall thickness. Don't need to look any further than the difference in chamber & baffle for the differences in sound. All NY Meyers I've seen are squarer chambers like the current ones, maybe 'early' ones just haven't come my way yet and they're rare. The Bros had a rounder, shorter chamber with a different squeeze. Just talking about medium chamber, the Bros has a smooth transition into a tapered bore but the NY has a step up into a more cylindrical bore. The Bros medium is closer in size to the NY small. Sound, the Bros has more middle than the NY.

These are two (six really) slightly but significantly different pieces.
 

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And some of the early Bros pieces were actually from blanks made by one of the French companies and finished out here.

...so while Morgan said a Meyer is a Meyer it turns out that a Meyer isnt a Meyer if its sometimes something else :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for helpful and valid information by two experts. There is a vintage Meyer NY 5m alto mouthpiece on its way to me for a trial. I have never played a Meyer Bros or NY before, so I want to know what these pieces are all about concerning structural and tonal differences. But I will let my ears decide in the fist place. I mostly play tenor and have developed an ear for what is "my" mouthpiece in that field. With the alto, I'm still insecure. I got a Gottsu Sepia 6 with a medium chamber with my Inderbinen alto, and thus I will have a chance to compare at least a little bit. This is what the Gottsu sounds like on the Inderbinen. I'm not much of a player, so this is just an impression of my first attempt on the alto with the Gottsu Sepia. The aif-file will take some seconds to load.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/66272036/Inderbinen Gottsu.aif
 
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